Database: Ovid medline(R) Search Strategy



tải về 280.42 Kb.
trang4/5
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu03.06.2018
Kích280.42 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5

<15>

Unique Identifier

12123145

Authors


Baravarian B.

Institution

Department of Surgery, Division of Podiatric Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, 100 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suite 460, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Bbaravarian@mednet.ucla.edu

Title


Soft-tissue disorders of the ankle: a comprehensive arthroscopic approach. [Review] [38 refs]

Source


Clinics in Podiatric Medicine & Surgery. 19(2):271-83, vi, 2002 Apr.

Abstract


Ankle arthroscopy has dramatically advanced in the past decade. Many ailments of the ankle joint that were previously treated through open approaches are today treated with arthroscopic techniques. Arthroscopy allows for a more rapid recovery, better visualization of soft tissue lesions within the ankle joint and a more thorough examination of intracapsular ankle pathology. This article describes current arthroscopic treatments of ankle pathology limited to soft tissue structures. Additionally, a perspective is presented for the comprehensive treatment of lateral ankle pain including arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization. [References: 38]

<16>

Unique Identifier

7954206

Authors


Stienstra JJ.

Title


Intra-articular soft-tissue masses of the ankle. Meniscoid lesions and transarticular fibrous bands. [Review] [30 refs]

Source


Clinics in Podiatric Medicine & Surgery. 11(3):371-83, 1994 Jul.

Abstract


Meniscoid lesions and fibrous bands are unique lesions, most likely of differing origin. Although they are similar in clinical presentation, their appearance at arthroscopy is clearly different. The meniscoid lesion is attached only at its origin at the inferolateral gutter on the anterior talofibular ligament. Fibrous bands are attached at two ends and may be found anywhere in the joint but are most common extending dramatically over the anterior joint line. Unexpected encountering of a fibrous band should alert the surgeon to carefully inspect the joint for other associated (occult) pathology. Because of the frequent association of bands with antecedent fracture, the observation of this lesion should lead the clinician to consider antecedent intra-articular fracture (transchondral fracture, malleolar fracture, and tibial pilon fracture) as a likely co-pathology. Careful examination of the ankle and review of the radiographs and other available images may be helpful in assessing the joint for these injuries when fibrous bands are encountered. The association of meniscoid lesion with prior soft tissue injury (sprain) is also important to understanding this lesion. Excision of both these abnormal lesions in concert with repair of coexistent pathology is associated with improvement of symptoms. Finally, both fibrous bands and meniscoid lesions are associated with symptoms that warrant closer inspection and observation. Whether the operative intervention is open or closed, the reader can benefit from the information presented. [References: 30]

<17>

Unique Identifier

7766497

Authors


Biundo JJ Jr. Mipro RC Jr. Djuric V.

Institution

Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans, USA.

Title


Peripheral nerve entrapment, occupation-related syndromes, sports injuries, bursitis, and soft-tissue problems of the shoulder. [Review] [28 refs]

Source


Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 7(2):151-5, 1995 Mar.

Abstract


In this review, three areas are highlighted: knee injuries due to athletic events, carpal tunnel syndrome, and shoulder problems, especially glenoid labral tears. In patients with chronic anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency, an increasing incidence of meniscal tears was seen. A Finnish study showed that athletes from all types of competitive sports are at a slightly increased risk of requiring hospital care because of osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, or ankle. A number of studies on the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome were published, and some of these are reviewed. The shoulder continues to be an intriguing but troublesome joint both to patients and physicians. A biopsy study of the subacromial bursa is reviewed, and several cases of suprascapular nerve entrapment were presented this year, again calling attention to this underrecognized entity. Finally, several articles on tears of the glenoid labrum are reviewed here, especially those focusing on the tear of the superior segment of the labrum from the anterior to the posterior aspects. [References: 28]

<18>

Unique Identifier

10319217

Authors


Liu SH. Nguyen TM.

Institution

UCLA Medical Center 90095, USA.

Title


Ankle sprains and other soft tissue injuries. [Review] [71 refs]

Source


Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 11(2):132-7, 1999 Mar.

Abstract


Lateral ankle sprains are the most frequently encountered injuries in sports. In the evaluation of lateral ankle injury, one should consider all soft tissue structures (i.e., peroneal tendons, ligaments of the ankle, subtalar joints, around the lateral ankle). The treatment of most ankle sprains has evolved from immobilization to functional rehabilitation. Many patients with ankle sprains return to their previous activities. A few patients are left with pain and residual instability after conservative treatment; thus, the question of when to operate on acute severe ankle sprain remains controversial. The other challenge physicians face is the problem of persistent lateral ankle pain after sprain. This condition may be due to intra-articular or extra-articular pathology (i.e., soft tissue lateral ankle impingement, osteochondral lesion, or partial peroneal tendon tear). Diagnosis can be made with careful history, physical examination, and appropriate ancillary studies. Only proper diagnosis can lead to uncompromised, undelayed patient care. [References: 71]

<19>

Unique Identifier

12764653

Authors


Schaffler GJ. Tirman PF. Stoller DW. Genant HK. Ceballos C. Dillingham MF.

Institution

Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117, USA. gottfried.schaffler@kfunigraz.ac.at

Title


Impingement syndrome of the ankle following supination external rotation trauma: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation.

Source


European Radiology. 13(6):1357-62, 2003 Jun.

Abstract


Our objective was to identify MR imaging findings in patients with syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle and to investigate the reliability of these imaging characteristics to predict syndesmotic soft tissue impingement syndromes of the ankle. Twenty-one ankles with chronic pain ultimately proven to have anterior soft tissue impingement syndrome were examined by MR imaging during January 1996 to June 2001. The MR imaging protocol included sagittal and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), sagittal T1-weighted spin echo, axial and coronal proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. Nineteen ankles that underwent MR imaging during the same period of time and that had arthroscopically proven diagnosis different than impingement syndrome served as a control group. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments possibly related to syndesmotic soft tissue impingement were recorded. Arthroscopy was performed subsequently in all patients and was considered the gold standard. The statistical analysis revealed an overall frequency of scarred syndesmotic ligaments of 70% in the group with ankle impingement. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments presented with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and remained low to intermediate in signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Compared with arthroscopy, MR imaging revealed a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 93% for scarred syndesmotic ligaments. The frequency of scar formation distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments in patients with impingement syndrome of the ankle was not statistically significantly higher than in the control group. In contrast to that, anterior tibial osteophytes and talar osteophytes were statistically significantly higher in the group with anterior impingement than in the control group. Conventional MR imaging was found to be insensitive for the diagnosis of syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle. Fibrovascular scar tissue distinct from syndesmotic ligaments is suggestive for the diagnosis of soft tissue impingement, but the reliability of these findings is still questionable.

<20>

Unique Identifier

9282179

Authors


Segers MJ. Wink D. Clevers GJ.

Institution

Department of Surgery, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Title


Bicycle-spoke injuries: a prospective study.

Source


Injury. 28(4):267-9, 1997 May.

Abstract


A prospective study of bicycle-spoke injuries was undertaken to assess the severity of soft tissue damage and the incidence of skeletal injuries. During a 12 month period, 59 children with spoke injuries were examined. Soft tissue damage was divided into three categories: bruising without laceration (four), bruising and superficial abrasions (49) and full thickness skin defects (six). Seventeen children had skeletal injuries: nine tibial fractures (five greenstick fractures and four spiral fractures) and eight epiphyseal injuries of the distal fibula. All fractures were treated non-operatively. The mean time for soft tissue healing was 16.5 days and the mean time for regaining full weight-bearing was 8.5 days. Soft tissue damage is the most important prognostic factor in the healing of a bicycle-spoke injury.

<21>

Unique Identifier

10748807

Authors


Kao KF. Huang PJ. Chen YW. Cheng YM. Lin SY. Ko SH.

Institution

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Title


Postero-medio-anterior approach of the ankle for the pilon fracture.

Source


Injury. 31(2):71-4, 2000 Mar.

Abstract


A good view of the operative field is important for better reduction and fixation in surgical treatment of fractures. The exposure of the ankle joint for the pilon fracture is commonly through the anterior approach, or combined with the medical approach. But sometimes it is still difficult to have complete viewing of the articular surface and to apply internal fixation by that approach. In recent years, we developed a "postero-medio-anterior" approach of the ankle joint by one incision. This approach provides an excellent exposure of the anterior, medial and posterior aspects of the ankle joint with a clear view of the articular surface. In our 45 cases of pilon fracture during 1991 to 1995, there was no incisional injury to the neurovascular bundle. Superficial wound edge necrosis was noted in two cases which healed later without further procedure. Therefore, we recommend this approach as a simple and reliable incision for open reduction of pilon fractures.

<22>

Unique Identifier

11590481

Authors


Snellman K. Parkkari J. Kannus P. Leppala J. Vuori I. Jarvinen M.

Institution

Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, UKK Institute, Tampere, Finland.

Title


Sports injuries in floorball: a prospective one-year follow-up study.

Source


International Journal of Sports Medicine. 22(7):531-6, 2001 Oct.

Abstract


Two hundred and ninety-five licensed floorball players from Finnish premier to fifth division were observed prospectively for one season to study the incidence, nature, causes and severity of floorball injuries. During the study period, 100 out of the 295 (34 %) players sustained 120 injuries. Thirty-seven percent (73/199) of the male players and 28 % (27/96) of the females suffered from an injury. The injury rate was 1.0 per 1000 practice hours for both sexes. The injury rates per 1000 game hours were 23.7 for men and 15.9 for women. One hundred injuries (83 %) were acute and the remaining 20 (17 %) were overuse injuries. Sprain was the most common type of injury in men while overuse injuries were the most frequent injury type in women. The lower extremity was involved in 62 %, spine or trunk in 19 % and upper extremity in 10 % of the injuries. The most commonly injured sites were the knee and ankle (22 % and 20 % of all injuries), followed by head and neck (8 %). In both sexes the majority of injuries were minor, level II, injuries. Ten of the knee injuries (38 %) were serious, level IV injuries, of which seven were ACL ruptures. In conclusion, the individual risk of injury in floorball is relatively low in game practice while rather high during the game itself. Before initiation of clinical trials on prevention of floorball injuries, an exact knowledge of the risk factors and mechanisms of floorball injuries are needed.

<23>

Unique Identifier

11733671

Authors


Vives MJ. Abidi NA. Ishikawa SN. Taliwal RV. Sharkey PF.

Institution

The Rothman Institute at Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

Title


Soft tissue injuries with the use of safe corridors for transfixion wire placement during external fixation of distal tibia fractures: an anatomic study.

Source


Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 15(8):555-9, 2001 Nov.

Abstract


OBJECTIVES: To determine which soft tissue structures are at risk and when joint violation can occur during small wire placement for hybrid external fixation of distal tibial fractures while adhering to published guidelines. DESIGN: Cadaver anatomic experiment. SETTING: University orthopaedic program. SUJBECTS: Five embalmed cadavers. INTERVENTION: Placement of small wire transfixion pins in the distal tibia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Dissection and measurements. METHODS: Four orthopaedic surgeons were shown diagrams that have been widely accepted as allowing for placement of transfixion pins in the distal tibia through safe corridors. Each of the orthopaedic surgeons was then asked to place two transfixion pins into each of five cadaver legs in a position that would provide stable external fixation of the metaphysis to the diaphysis with a circular fixator (forty pins total) for a distal tibial fracture within five centimeters of the plafond. The specimens were dissected, and pins impaling neurovascular structures, tendons, or the ankle capsule were recorded. The superior capsular synovial reflections were measured from the anterior joint line and the tip of the medial malleolus. These measurements were also performed on arthrograms of two extremities before their dissection. RESULTS: Fifty-five percent of the pins placed impaled at least one tendon that crosses the ankle joint. Neurovascular structures that were impaled included the saphenous vein (+/-10.5 percent) and the superficial peroneal nerve (+/-7.5 percent). One pin violated the superior capsular synovial reflection, which was an average of thirty-two millimeters (+/-1.58 millimeters) from the tip of the medial malleolus and twenty-one millimeters (+/-1.63 millimeters) from the anteromedial joint line. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that tendons and neurovascular structures above the ankle are at risk during small transfixion pin placement, even when using safe corridors. Pins placed within two centimeters of the anterior joint line or three centimeters from the medial malleolus may be intracapsular.

<24>

Unique Identifier

8027888

Authors


Hak DJ. Johnson EE.

Institution

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles 90024.

Title


The use of the unreamed nail in tibial fractures with concomitant preoperative or intraoperative elevated compartment pressure or compartment syndrome.

Source


Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 8(3):203-11, 1994.

Abstract


Twelve patients with tibial shaft fractures and evidence of compartment syndrome or with documented elevated compartment pressures were treated with an unreamed locked intramedullary nail and a single-incision lateral four-compartment fasciotomy. There were six closed fractures and three grade I and three grade II open fractures. Ten fractures have achieved a solid union without shortening or significant angulation at an average follow-up of 8.1 months (range 4-26). Two patients were lost to follow-up. There were two delayed unions and one nonunion, all of which healed after additional treatment. Average time to tibial union was 5.8 months (range 2-24), with six fractures healing in < or = 4 months. One patient whose treatment was delayed > 12 h after his injury has a persistent neurologic deficit with a claw toe deformity. There were no superficial or deep infections. All patients obtained an excellent range of motion of the knee and ankle. Unreamed nailing of diaphyseal tibial fractures with an associated compartment syndrome provides optimal internal fixation while allowing excellent access for soft tissue care. We believe that the unreamed tibial nail, when combined with a single-incision, lateral, four-compartment fasciotomy, offers substantial advantage in the treatment of this injury, permitting optimal treatment of a difficult fracture and soft tissue injury.

<25>

Unique Identifier

11336144

Authors


Musharafieh R. Atiyeh B. Macari G. Haidar R.

Institution

Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hand and Microvascular Surgery, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Lebanon.

Title


Radial forearm fasciocutaneous free-tissue transfer in ankle and foot reconstruction: review of 17 cases.

Source


Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery. 17(3):147-50, 2001 Apr.

Abstract


Seventeen patients who underwent soft-tissue reconstruction of various anatomic regions of the foot and ankle, using the radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap, are reported. The procedures were performed between January, 1992 and December, 1998. Indications for reconstruction included diabetes and/or vascular insufficiency (four patients), soft-tissue defects (six patients), and chronic osteomyelitis (seven patients). The weight-bearing surface of the foot was involved in 16 patients. Defects ranged in size from 35 to 206 cm2 (mean: 86.2 cm2). At a mean follow-up of 3.8 years, the radial forearm flap was successful in all cases (100 percent). Flap complications included superficial infection (three patients), and minor wound dehiscence at the flap-leg-skin interface (two patients). Recurrent ulceration occurred in two patients; both were diabetics with weight-bearing flaps. Donor-site complications included partial skin graft loss with tendon exposure in one patient, which healed with conservative management. Recurrent or persistent osteomyelitis was not demonstrated in any of the patients. Of the 16 patients with weight-bearing flaps, 12 were ambulatory, three had limited ambulation, and one was non-ambulatory. Three patients required modified shoes. No debulking of the transferred flaps was necessary. The radial forearm flap is one of the preferred flaps for reconstruction of moderate-sized ankle and foot defects, for weight-bearing surfaces, and in the treatment of osteomyelitic and diabetic wounds. It meets most of the anatomic prerequisites for an ideal foot coverage; it also facilitates the restoration of normal foot contour, allowing patients to wear ordinary shoes. The flap provides a durable and stable weight-bearing plantar surface during ambulation, and achieves excellent aesthetic results; when used as a neurosensory flap, it permits adequate reinnervation.

<26>

Unique Identifier

8145343

Authors


Boyer MI. Bowen V. Weiler P.

Institution

Division of Surgical Research, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

Title


Reconstruction of a severe grinding injury to the medial malleolus and the deltoid ligament of the ankle using a free plantaris tendon graft and vascularized gracilis free muscle transfer: case report.

Source


Journal of Trauma-Injury Infection & Critical Care. 36(3):454-7, 1994 Mar.

Abstract


Whether or not to reconstruct deltoid ligament injuries of the ankle remains controversial. We present a case of deltoid ligament loss and an extensive overlying soft tissue defect from a grinding injury. The resultant gross medial ankle instability and soft tissue defect necessitated deltoid ligament reconstruction using a free plantaris tendon graft and soft tissue coverage using a free muscle transfer.

<27>

Unique Identifier

10421192

Authors


Tu YK. Ueng SW. Yeh WL. Wang KC.

Institution

Orthopedic Trauma Department, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan.

Title


Reconstruction of ankle and heel defects by a modified wide-base reverse sural flap.

Source


Journal of Trauma-Injury Infection & Critical Care. 47(1):82-8, 1999 Jul.

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Flap reconstruction around the ankle and heel is a technically demanding procedure. Some patients have contraindications for microsurgery, however, limiting the options for local tissue transfer. In this study, we describe our experience with a new flap technique for ankle and heel coverage. METHODS: We designed a modified wide-base reverse sural flap and applied it to 20 patients with lower leg trauma from 1994 to 1997. All patients sustained Gustilo type IIIb,c open fractures with soft-tissue defects around the ankle and heel. Six cases had chronic osteomyelitis. Most of our patients had contraindications for microsurgery such as old age, poor medical condition, or heavy smoker status. The average age was 69.5 years old, and the average follow-up time was 18.5 months. RESULTS: All 20 patients underwent successful modified reverse sural flap reconstruction. There were no deep infections, no soft-tissue necrosis, or pressure ulcers. The nonunion rate was 5%. The average time for flap elevation and rotation was 29.3 minutes. No blood transfusion was required. An unsightly scar was the major complaint (60%) from our patients. Seventeen cases (85%) achieved good functional outcomes. CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates that our design of this modified wide-base reverse sural flap is suitable for flap reconstruction around the ankle and heel; especially for patients who have difficulty in receiving microsurgery. The surgical procedure is simple, and the results are satisfactory.

<28>

Unique Identifier

11130481

Authors


Pai CH. Lin GT. Lin SY. Lin SD. Lai CS.

Institution

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fangliao General Hospital, Pingtung, Taiwan.

Title


Extensor digitorum brevis rotational muscle flap for lower leg and ankle coverage.

Source


Journal of Trauma-Injury Infection & Critical Care. 49(6):1012-6, 2000 Dec.

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Soft tissue reconstruction around the ankle has been a challenging problem. This article reports our experience using the extensor digitorum brevis muscle flap; some technical variations are discussed. METHODS: The extensor digitorum brevis muscle flap is vascularized by the well-defined lateral tarsal artery, a branch of the dorsalis pedis artery originating at the level of the inferior extensor retinaculum. This flap was used for coverage of soft tissue defects in the lower leg and the ankle in 10 patients with various injuries. RESULTS: All flaps survived completely. Complications included delayed healing of donor skin in two cases. Flap elevation was possible even in the traumatized donor foot. CONCLUSION: The advantages of this flap include constant and reliable blood supply, easy and rapid flap dissection, adequate bulk, and one-stage procedure. However, disadvantages include the small size of the flap and the sacrifice of the dorsalis pedis artery.
1   2   3   4   5


Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©hocday.com 2016
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương