Database: Ovid medline(R) Search Strategy



tải về 280.42 Kb.
trang1/5
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu03.06.2018
Kích280.42 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5
Database: Ovid MEDLINE(R) <1966 to January Week 3 2004>

Search Strategy:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 exp soft tissue injuries/cl, co, di, dt, pc, px, ra, ri, rt, rh, su, th (986)

2 exp athletic injuries/ or exp sports/ (54981)

3 1 and 2 (66)

4 limit 3 to (human and english language) (55)

5 limit 4 to ovid full text available (6)

6 4 (55)

7 limit 6 to review articles (23)

8 from 7 keep 13,20 (2)

9 7 not 8 (21)

10 5 or 9 (25)

11 limit 4 to yr=1999-2004 (24)

12 from 11 keep 15,17,20 (3)

13 11 not 12 (21)

14 10 or 13 (36)

15 from 14 keep 1-36 (36)

16 from 15 keep 1-36 (36)
***************************

<1>

Unique Identifier

11008871

Authors


Yokoyama K. Nakamura T. Shindo M. Tsukamoto T. Saita Y. Aoki S. Itoman M.

Institution

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan.

Title


Contributing factors influencing the functional outcome of floating knee injuries.

Source


American Journal of Orthopedics (Chatham, Nj). 29(9):721-9, 2000 Sep.

Abstract


The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively review the floating knee injuries treated at our institute and to determine various factors, such as severity of soft-tissue or skeletal injuries, site of fractures, and treatment methods that may significantly influence the final functional result in these injuries. Between 1986 and 1996, 65 patients with 66 floating knee injuries were treated in our institution. Among 66 fractures of the femur, 19 (29%) were open. There were 43 open tibial fractures. Fifty cases were Fraser type I floating knee fractures, 7 were type IIa, 2 were type IIb, and 7 were type IIc. In 63 cases (95%), both bones had been surgically stabilized with interlocked nails, Ender pins, plates, screws with/without pinning, or external fixations. Final functional results were evaluated according to Karlstrom and Olerud's criteria. Satisfactory results were rated as cases with excellent or good results. The mean follow-up time was 16.6 months range, (12-50 months). We assessed various factors influencing functional results, including Fraser type, severity of open injury grade (Gustilo) in both fractures, combination of open/closed injuries, fracture types (AO/ASIF type), existence of multiple trauma, neurovascular injuries, polyskeletal trauma, and stabilizing method or operation timing of both fractures. Satisfactory rates in Fraser type I and type II were 64% and 25%, respectively (P= .02). The satisfactory rate in closed, grade I+II, and grade III injuries of the femoral fractures was 53.2%, 81.8%, and 25%, respectively (grade I+II vs. grade III: P < .03). There were no significant correlations between the functional result and the following factors: soft-tissue injuries of the tibia; the fracture pattern of both fractures; the combination of open/closed injuries in each fracture; injury severity score; the existence of neurovascular injuries and double femoral fractures; treatment methods; and operation timing. Severity of damage to the knee joint and open injuries in the thigh were found to be significant factors contributing to the functional outcome in floating knee injuries.

<2>

Unique Identifier

12567051

Authors


Kuo YR. Kuo MH. Chou WC. Liu YT. Lutz BS. Jeng SF.

Institution

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Kaohsiung, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien, Taiwan.

Title


One-stage reconstruction of soft tissue and Achilles tendon defects using a composite free anterolateral thigh flap with vascularized fascia lata: clinical experience and functional assessment.

Source


Annals of Plastic Surgery. 50(2):149-55, 2003 Feb.

Abstract


The combined loss of the Achilles tendon with overlying soft tissue is a reconstructive challenge. To achieve acceptable rehabilitation, such patients need skin coverage including functional repair of the Achilles tendon. This article presents four such patients who were treated successfully by means of an anterolateral thigh (ALT) composite flap with vascularized fascia lata. The size of the ALT flaps ranged from 10 to 16 cm in length and 6 to 9 cm in width. All flaps included vascularized fascia lata, which was rolled to serve as vascularized tendon graft (range 8 x 6 cm to 10 x 8 cm) for reconstruction of the Achilles tendon defect. Flap success rate was 100%. All patients could walk and climb stairs without support; however, mild difficulty when running was reported. Functional outcome of the recipient ankle and donor thigh morbidity were investigated by using a kinetic dynamometer comparing reconstructed sides with the healthy contralateral limbs. This assessment was performed in two patients at 2 years postoperatively. In the reconstructed ankles, isokinetic concentric measurements of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion showed a deficit of 30% and 40%, respectively. Functional evaluation of quadriceps femoris muscle contraction forces after free ALT composite flap harvest showed a 10% to 25% deficit. However, there were no difficulties in daily ambulating. In summary, the free composite ALT flap with vascularized fascia lata provides an alternative option for Achilles tendon reconstruction in complex defects.

<3>

Unique Identifier

8149440

Authors


Hart LE.

Institution

Rheumatic Disease Unit, Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Title


Exercise and soft tissue injury. [Review] [62 refs]

Source


Baillieres Clinical Rheumatology. 8(1):137-48, 1994 Feb.

Abstract


Once the almost exclusive domain of the orthopaedic surgeon, sports injuries are now being seen with increasing frequency by other specialists, including rheumatologists. It is therefore important for rheumatologists to be able to diagnose and manage the various musculoskeletal conditions that are associated with physical activity. Soft tissue injuries are a very common cause of morbidity in both competitive and recreational athletes. Most of these conditions are provoked by muscle-tendon overload (or overuse) that is usually the result of excessive training or improper training techniques. However, despite an emerging literature on the natural history of soft tissue overuse syndromes, relatively little is known about the causes, incidence and outcome of many of these injuries. Of the methodologically robust epidemiological studies that have been done, most have focused on habitual distance runners. In this population, it has been reported that the incidence of injury can be as high as 50% or more, and that overtraining and the presence of previous injury are the most significant predictors of future injury. In other popular forms of exercise, such as walking, swimming, cycling, aerobics and racquet sports, injuries are also reported with high frequency but, to date, no prospective studies have examined actual incidences in these populations, and risk factors for injury in these activities remain speculative. Several of the more commonly occurring soft tissue injuries (such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, patellar tendinitis, the iliotibial band friction syndrome, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis) exemplify the overuse concept and are therefore highlighted in this review. The management of these, and most other, exercise-related soft tissue injuries is directed towards promptly restoring normal function and preventing re-injury. [References: 62]

<4>

Unique Identifier

10597860

Authors


de Cree C.

Title


Frostbite at the gym: it's not the ice but the temperature that matters![comment].

Comments


Comment on: Br J Sports Med. 1999 Aug;33(4):278-9; PMID: 10450486

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 33(6):435-6, 1999 Dec.

<5>

Unique Identifier

10597861

Authors


Kerr K.

Title


Frostbite at the gym.[comment].

Comments


Comment on: Br J Sports Med. 1999 Aug;33(4):278-9; PMID: 10450486

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 33(6):436, 1999 Dec.

<6>

Unique Identifier

10205709

Authors


Harrington P.

Title


An audit of the use of magnetic resonance imaging by the sports injuries service of a university teaching hospital.

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 33(2):141, 1999 Apr.

<7>

Unique Identifier

11726471

Authors


Yeung EW. Yeung SS.

Institution

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. rsella@polyu.edu.hk

Title


A systematic review of interventions to prevent lower limb soft tissue running injuries.

Source


British Journal of Sports Medicine. 35(6):383-9, 2001 Dec.

Abstract


OBJECTIVES: To assess the available evidence for preventive strategies for lower limb soft tissue injuries caused by running. METHODS: An electronic database search was conducted using The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline, Embase, Sport Discus, Heracles, Atlantes, Biosis, Cinahl, Scisearch, Current Contents, Index To Theses and Dissertation Abstracts. Any randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating interventions to prevent running injuries to lower limb soft tissue were included. The eligibility of trials for inclusion and the quality of the trials were independently assessed by two reviewers. RESULTS: Exposure to a high training load (duration, frequency, or running distance) increases the risk of injury, and thus modification of the training schedule can reduce the incidence of injury. The effectiveness of stretching exercises and of insoles in the prevention of lower extremity soft tissue injuries caused by running is not known. Wearing a knee brace with a patellar support ring may be effective in the prevention of anterior knee pain caused by running. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides evidence for the effectiveness of the modification of training schedules in reducing lower limb soft tissue running injuries. More studies are required to quantify the optimal training loads and to confirm that knee braces can prevent knee pain. It is important to note that the studies included in this review had few female participants therefore the results may not be generalisable.

<8>

Unique Identifier

11409239

Authors


Breslow MJ. Rosen JE.

Institution

NYU-Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 301 East 17th Street, New York, New York 10003, USA.

Title


Cervical spine injuries in football. [Review] [30 refs]

Source


Bulletin of the Hospital for Joint Diseases. 59(4):201-10, 2000.

Abstract


The game of football, as it is played today, poses serious risk of injury for players of all ages. Injury may occur to any structure of the spinal column, including its bony, ligamentous and soft tissue components. The majority of cervical spine injuries occurring in football are self limited, and a full recovery can be expected. While these injuries are relatively uncommon, cervical spine injuries represent a significant proportion of athletic injuries that can produce permanent disability. The low incidence of cervical spine injuries has lead to a lack of emergency management experience of on-site medical staff. This paper will review the numerous injuries sustained by the cervical spine in football players and provide insights into prevention and guidelines for return to play. [References: 30]

<9>

Unique Identifier

11403116

Authors


MacAuley D.

Institution

Institute of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Science, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, UK. dc.macauley@ulst.ac.uk

Title


Do textbooks agree on their advice on ice?.

Source


Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. 11(2):67-72, 2001 Apr.

Abstract


OBJECTIVE: To study ice therapy guidance in sports medicine textbooks. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of a convenience sample of textbooks. STUDY SELECTION: 45 general sports medicine texts were included in the study. DATA EXTRACTION: The indices and chapter headings of each text were searched using key words "ice," "cryotherapy," "soft tissue injury," "muscle," and "bruise." DATA SYNTHESIS: In 17 of the textbooks, there was no guidance on the duration, frequency, or length of ice treatment or on the use of barriers between ice and the skin. Advice on treatment duration was given in 28 texts but recommendations differed depending on the particular ice therapy, injury location, or severity. There was considerable variation in the recommended duration and frequency of advised treatments. CONCLUSION: There was little guidance in the standard textbooks on ice application, and the advice varied greatly. There is a need for evidence-based sport and exercise medicine with a consensus on the appropriate use of ice in acute soft tissue injury.

<10>

Unique Identifier

12792207

Authors


Babul S. Rhodes EC. Taunton JE. Lepawsky M.

Institution

BC Injury Research & Prevention Unit, Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Center, Family Medicine, University of British Columbia, Canada. sbabul@cw.bc.ca

Title


Effects of intermittent exposure to hyperbaric oxygen for the treatment of an acute soft tissue injury.

Source


Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. 13(3):138-47, 2003 May.

Abstract


OBJECTIVE: To assess the hypothesis that subjects exposed to intermittent hyperbaric oxygen treatments would recover from signs and symptoms indicative of delayed-onset muscle soreness faster than subjects exposed to normoxic air. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blinded study with a 4-day treatment protocol. SETTING: University-based sports medicine clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen sedentary female university students. INTERVENTIONS: All subjects performed 300 maximal voluntary eccentric contractions (30 sets of 10 repetitions per minute) of their nondominant leg (110 to 35 degrees of knee flexion) at a slow speed (30 degrees per second) on a dynamometer to elicit muscle damage and injury. Hyperbaric oxygen treatments consisted of 100% oxygen for 60 minutes at 2.0 atmospheres absolute (ATA), while the control group received 21% oxygen at 1.2 ATA for the same amount of time. Both groups received treatment immediately after the induction of delayed-onset muscle soreness and each day thereafter for a period of 4 days (day 1 postexercise through day 4 postexercise). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dependent variables (perceived muscle soreness, isokinetic strength, quadriceps circumference, creatine kinase, and malondialdehyde) were assessed at baseline (preexercise, day 0), 4 hours postexercise (day 1), 24 hours postexercise (day 2), 48 hours postexercise (day 3), and 72 hours postexercise (day 4). Magnetic resonance images (T2 relaxation time/short tip inversion recovery) were assessed at baseline (day 0), 24 hours postexercise (day 3), and 72 hours postexercise (day 5). RESULTS: Repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed on all of the dependent variables to assess differences between treatment and control groups. Analyses revealed no significant differences between groups for treatment effects for any of the dependent variables (pain, strength, quadriceps circumference, creatine kinase, malondialdehyde, or magnetic resonance images). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is not effective in the treatment of exercise-induced muscle injury as indicated by the markers evaluated.

<11>

Unique Identifier

8641086

Authors


Husband JB. McPherson SA.

Institution

Park Nicollet Hand Center, St. Louis Park, MN, USA.

Title


Bony skier's thumb injuries.

Source


Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research. (327):79-84, 1996 Jun.

Abstract


Avulsion fractures of the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint (bony skier's thumb) may result in chronic instability with pain and weakness of pinch if improperly treated. Management requires an understanding of the relevant anatomy and careful clinical examination including stress testing. Undisplaced, or minimally displaced and stable fractures are treated conservatively, whereas displaced, rotated and unstable fractures require surgical treatment.

<12>

Unique Identifier

9209819

Authors


Best TM.

Institution

Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, USA.

Title


Soft-tissue injuries and muscle tears. [Review] [44 refs]

Source


Clinics in Sports Medicine. 16(3):419-34, 1997 Jul.

Abstract


Soft-tissue injuries and muscle tears occur frequently in athletes. The mainstay of treatment in most cases is nonoperative management and aggressive rehabilitation. Most injuries result from direct trauma or contusion or indirect stretch injury. It is important to keep in mind the possibility of other potentially more serious conditions, such as compartment syndrome. More research is needed to define optimal treatment patterns and potential strategies for injury prevention. [References: 44]

<13>

Unique Identifier

8726316

Authors


Halikis MN. Taleisnik J.

Institution

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California Irvine, Orange, USA.

Title


Soft-tissue injuries of the wrist. [Review] [64 refs]

Source


Clinics in Sports Medicine. 15(2):235-59, 1996 Apr.

Abstract


The wide spectrum of athletic activities places demands of different magnitudes, orientations, and degrees of repetition on the wrists of athletes. These demands can result in injuries to the soft tissues of the wrist, which may make optimal athletic performance difficult if not impossible. With the advent of increased awareness of injuries particular to a sport and advances in diagnostic acumen, both technologic and clinical, these once enigmatic pathologic entities can be approached with a treatment plan that often can return the athlete to competition quickly. A number of these injuries and their pathomechanics, diagnosis, and treatment options have been described in this article. Although adequate treatment of the subject of athletic soft-tissue injuries to the wrist requires a more lengthy discussion than is appropriate here, the material presented on dorsal pain disorders, carpal instability, and the triangular fibrocartilage complex should serve as a starting point for increasing cognizance and understanding of the injured wrist in the athlete. [References: 64]

<14>

Unique Identifier

8726321

Authors


Griggs SM. Weiss AP.

Institution

Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, School of Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, USA.

Title


Bony injuries of the wrist, forearm, and elbow. [Review] [114 refs]

Source


Clinics in Sports Medicine. 15(2):373-400, 1996 Apr.

Abstract


One of the greatest challenges when examining an injured athlete is ensuring that the examination encompasses the whole patient and not just the obvious deformity. Bony injuries of the wrist, forearm, and elbow are uncommon in athletes and when present should always lead to suspicion of possible concomitant soft tissue injury. Mechanisms causing osseous disruption are of fairly high energy and can be quite disabling to the long-term career of the athlete. Appropriate expectations with regard to both treatment and the possible return to sports are critical in providing successful treatment for these often complex injuries. There is no substitute for a careful clinical history and physical examination in not only establishing the diagnosis but ensuring that a complete diagnosis with its subsequent prognostic outcome can be rendered. [References: 114]

<15>

Unique Identifier

8891410

Authors


Cooper PS. Murray TF Jr.

Institution

Division of Foot and Ankle Services, University of Connecticut Health Cenhter, Farmington, USA.

Title


Arthroscopy of the foot and ankle in the athlete. [Review] [68 refs]

Source


Clinics in Sports Medicine. 15(4):805-24, 1996 Oct.

Abstract


Ankle arthroscopy has evolved over the past decade to address many acute and chronic injuries in the athlete. Although similar outcomes are reported with established open procedures, arthroscopic intervention confers the advantages of decreased postoperative morbidity and earlier return to sports activity. Arthroscopic procedures for the foot are evolving; however, most are considered investigational at this time. [References: 68]

<16>

Unique Identifier

11686985

Authors


Yeung EW. Yeung SS.

Institution

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong. rsella@polyu.edu.hk

Title


Interventions for preventing lower limb soft-tissue injuries in runners. [Review] [34 refs]

Source


Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. (3):CD001256, 2001.

Abstract


BACKGROUND: Overuse musculoskeletal injuries occur frequently in runners. Suggestions for prevention have focused on stretching exercises, modifying training schedules and the use of protective devices such as braces and insoles. To date, no systematic analysis of the literature on the effectiveness of these strategies in the prevention of overuse injuries has been published. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the review was to evaluate the evidence from randomised controlled trials on the prevention of lower limb soft-tissue running injuries. SEARCH STRATEGY: An electronic database search included The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group specialised register (date of last search October 2000), The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 1999), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), SPORT Discus (1975-2000), HERACLES (1975-2000), ATLANTES (1980-1996), BIOSIS, CINAHL, SCISEARCH, Current Contents, Index To Theses and Dissertation Abstracts. Date of last search for these databses: May 2000. SELECTION CRITERIA: Any randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating interventions to prevent lower limb soft-tissue running injuries. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: All trials fulfilling the selection criteria were assessed by two reviewers independently. Data were also extracted independently by the two reviewers using a pre-derived data extraction form. Exploratory analyses, including pooling of results from groups of trials of similar designs were undertaken, using a fixed effects model. Results were reported as relative risks (RR) with 95 per cent confidence intervals (95% CI). MAIN RESULTS: Twelve trials with 8,806 participants were included. In one trial, a single control group was matched to three different included intervention groups. The effectiveness of stretching exercises (5 trials, 1944 participants in the intervention groups, 3159 controls), and of insoles and footwear modification (5 trials, 903 participants in the intervention groups, 3006 controls) in the prevention of lower extremity soft tissue injuries associated with running is unknown. Reducing the distance, frequency and duration of running may be effective in the prevention of lower extremity soft tissue injuries associated with running (3 trials, 514 participants in intervention groups, 1663 controls). Wearing a knee brace with a patellar support ring may be effective in the prevention of running-associated anterior knee pain (1 trial, 27 participants in the intervention group, 33 controls). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: This review provides some evidence for the effectiveness of the modification of training schedules, but there is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of stretching exercises for major lower limb muscle groups in reducing lower limb soft-tissue running injuries. More studies are required to confirm that knee braces may prevent knee pain, to clarify the role of stretching, and to quantify optimal training loads. Generalisability of the results may be limited by the intensive nature of military training (the context for most of the studies) and the inclusion of only small numbers of women. [References: 34]
  1   2   3   4   5


Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©hocday.com 2016
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương