Database: Ovid medline(R) Search Strategy



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<17>

Unique Identifier

7766497

Authors


Biundo JJ Jr. Mipro RC Jr. Djuric V.

Institution

Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans, USA.

Title


Peripheral nerve entrapment, occupation-related syndromes, sports injuries, bursitis, and soft-tissue problems of the shoulder. [Review] [28 refs]

Source


Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 7(2):151-5, 1995 Mar.

Abstract


In this review, three areas are highlighted: knee injuries due to athletic events, carpal tunnel syndrome, and shoulder problems, especially glenoid labral tears. In patients with chronic anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency, an increasing incidence of meniscal tears was seen. A Finnish study showed that athletes from all types of competitive sports are at a slightly increased risk of requiring hospital care because of osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, or ankle. A number of studies on the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome were published, and some of these are reviewed. The shoulder continues to be an intriguing but troublesome joint both to patients and physicians. A biopsy study of the subacromial bursa is reviewed, and several cases of suprascapular nerve entrapment were presented this year, again calling attention to this underrecognized entity. Finally, several articles on tears of the glenoid labrum are reviewed here, especially those focusing on the tear of the superior segment of the labrum from the anterior to the posterior aspects. [References: 28]

<18>

Unique Identifier

11845021

Authors


Kandemir U. Fu FH. McMahon PJ.

Institution

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15203, USA.

Title


Elbow injuries. [Review] [82 refs]

Source


Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 14(2):160-7, 2002 Mar.

Abstract


The elbow is a commonly injured joint, yet physicians may be less comfortable treating injuries to the elbow compared with knee and shoulder injuries. Common injuries involving the elbow are tendinosis, instability, tendon ruptures, osteochondritis dissecans, and fractures. Tendinosis is a common overuse injury and may occur on the lateral, medial, or infrequently, the posterior side of the elbow. Injury to the medial or lateral ulnar collateral ligaments may result in instability. Repetitive trauma from overuse is the most common etiologic factor in athletes. Distal biceps and triceps tendon injuries may result in elbow disability in active individuals. Partial tears are more difficult to diagnose than complete ruptures. Osteochondritis dissecans of capitellum affects adolescents involved in overhead throwing athletics. Fractures about the elbow most commonly involve the radial head in adults, and the distal humerus in children. Athletes are prone to elbow injuries resulting from both overuse and acute trauma. Our purpose is to describe the diagnosis and treatment of these common elbow injuries in athletes of all ages. [References: 82]

<19>

Unique Identifier

10751018

Authors


Huang HH. Qureshi AA. Biundo JJ Jr.

Institution

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans 70112, USA.

Title


Sports and other soft tissue injuries, tendinitis, bursitis, and occupation-related syndromes. [Review] [41 refs]

Source


Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 12(2):150-4, 2000 Mar.

Abstract


This review highlights three areas: plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and carpal tunnel syndrome. The diagnosis and treatment of plantar fasciitis are reviewed; nonsurgical treatments remain the mainstay of management. Several recent articles support the use of night splints. Some novel treatments recently investigated, including low intensity laser irradiation and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, are reviewed, as well as the effectiveness of steroid injection. Novel treatments for Achilles tendinitis are also reviewed, including the use of injection therapy and the treatment approach of one author for the management of Achilles tendon rupture. Nonsurgical techniques in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, such as yoga, ultrasound, noninvasive laser neurolysis, manipulation, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, and medications, are reviewed. Prednisolone was shown to be effective in the treatment of mild to moderate disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were found to be ineffective. [References: 41]

<20>

Unique Identifier

9135920

Authors


Biundo JJ Jr. Mipro RC Jr. Fahey P.

Institution

Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans 70112, USA.

Title


Sports-related and other soft-tissue injuries, tendinitis, bursitis, and occupation-related syndromes.[see comment]. [Review] [20 refs]

Comments


Comment in: Curr Opin Rheumatol. 1997 Mar;9(2):133-4; PMID: 9135917

Source


Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 9(2):151-4, 1997 Mar.

Abstract


In this review, four areas are discussed: fluoroquinolone-induced tendinitis, volar flexor tenosynovitis (trigger finger), Achilles tendon lesions, and occupational medicine issues. The relationship of fluoroquinolone treatment to musculoskeletal lesions, especially Achilles tendinitis and tear, is most intriguing. The steady increase in reports of the association cannot be ignored. Although Achilles tendinitis and rupture have comprised the most frequently seen lesions, articles on additional sites of involvement, such as in lateral epicondylitis and De Quervain's tenosynovitis, are reviewed. Volar flexor tenosynovitis and trigger finger are among the most common musculoskeletal problems, and additional studies support the success of corticosteroid injections. Although the value of injections was reported well over 25 years ago, surgery is still unfortunately the first-choice treatment of some physicians. We review three studies on Achilles tendinopathy. In one of the reports, diagnostic ultrasonography is again demonstrated to be of value in assessing tendon lesions. The push to use the term tendinosis rather than tendinitis continues as a result of histologic studies of tendinitis that lack the usual findings of inflammation. However, the presence or absence of chemical inflammation is yet to be ascertained. We review an article that fails to show that work activities are the sole cause of such musculoskeletal syndromes as cumulative trauma or repetitive use. Further studies are needed in the area of work-related upper extremity disorders. [References: 20]

<21>

Unique Identifier

8850152

Authors


Byers GE 3rd. Berquist TH.

Institution

Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida, USA.

Title


Radiology of sports-related injuries. [Review] [148 refs]

Source


Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology. 25(1):1-49, 1996 Jan-Feb.

Abstract


Participation in organized sports and fitness activity continues to increase in the United States. As a result, more acute bone and soft-tissue injuries are occurring in this patient population. Chronic overuse syndromes are also more common today. It is important for radiologists to understand the mechanism of injury so that they can properly approach the imaging of these patients. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently the technique of choice, other imaging methods are also important and may, in certain cases, be preferred to MRI. In this review, we discuss extremity injuries by anatomic region. The spine is not included. A tailored imaging approach to each anatomic region and type of injury is discussed. [References: 148]

<22>

Unique Identifier

12205009

Authors


Dunn F.

Institution

Emergency Department, Belfast City Hospital, Belfast BT9 7AB, UK. fdunn@doctors.org.uk

Title


Two cases of biceps injury in bodybuilders with initially misleading presentation.

Source


Emergency Medicine Journal. 19(5):461-2, 2002 Sep.

Abstract


Two cases are reported of biceps injuries in body builders. In both cases the mechanism of injury is either unclear or initially misleading. One case went on to develop necrotising fasciitis, requiring extensive debridement after an initial diagnosis of a biceps haematoma. This report emphasises the difficulties inherent in differentiating necrotising and non-necrotising infections in the emergency department setting and highlights a subgroup of patients who may be at particular risk of delayed diagnosis.

<23>

Unique Identifier

12065121

Authors


Sijbrandij ES. van Gils AP. de Lange EE.

Institution

Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht and Central Military Hospital, Heidelberglaan 100, 3509 AA Utrecht, The Netherlands. sijbrane@sophia.nl

Title


Overuse and sports-related injuries of the ankle and hind foot: MR imaging findings.

Source


European Journal of Radiology. 43(1):45-56, 2002 Jul.

Abstract


Professional and recreational sporting activities have increased substantially in recent years and have led to a rise in the number of sports-related and overuse injuries. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become an important tool for evaluating the lower leg for providing the necessary information for patient management and rehabilitation following this injury. The purpose of this essay is to give an overview of the MR findings of common overuse injuries and sports-related injuries to the bones and soft-tissue structures of the hind foot and ankle.

<24>

Unique Identifier

10099161

Authors


ter Haar G.

Institution

Department of Physics, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT, UK. gail@icr.ac.uk

Title


Therapeutic ultrasound. [Review] [47 refs]

Source


European Journal of Ultrasound. 9(1):3-9, 1999 Mar.

Abstract


Therapeutic ultrasound has been in use for many years. Early applications were those for which tissue heating was the goal, and so it was used for soft tissue injuries such as may be incurred during sport. More recently, attention has been drawn both to high intensity focused beams that may be used for thermal ablation of selected regions, and also to low intensity fields that appear to be able to stimulate physiological processes, such as tissue repair, without biologically significant temperature rises. Ultrasonic tools are used for therapeutic effect in dentistry and are being investigated for use in thrombolysis. This paper reviews the various therapeutic applications of ultrasound. [References: 47]

<25>

Unique Identifier

9571416

Authors


Leddy JP.

Institution

Department of Surgery, Robert Wood Johnson University Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.

Title


Soft-tissue injuries of the hand in the athlete. [Review] [38 refs]

Source


Instructional Course Lectures. 47:181-6, 1998.

<26>

Unique Identifier

9546454

Authors


Tytherleigh-Strong G. Walls N. McQueen MM.

Institution

Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

Title


The epidemiology of humeral shaft fractures.

Source


Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery - British Volume. 80(2):249-53, 1998 Mar.

Abstract


We have analysed 249 consecutive fractures of the humeral shaft treated over a three-year period. The fractures were defined by their AO morphology, position, the age and gender of the patient and the mechanism of injury. Open fractures were classified using the Gustilo system and soft-tissue injury, and closed fractures using the Tscherne system. The fractures were classified as AO type A in 63.3%, type B in 26.2% and type C in 10.4%. Most (60%) occurred in the middle third of the diaphysis with 30% in the proximal and 10% in the distal third. The severity of the fracture and soft-tissue injury was greater with increasing injury severity. Less than 10% of the fractures were open. There was a bimodal age distribution with a peak in the third decade as a result of moderate to severe injury in men and a larger peak in the seventh decade after a simple fall in women.

<27>

Unique Identifier

11411623

Authors


Kraemer WJ. Bush JA. Wickham RB. Denegar CR. Gomez AL. Gotshalk LA. Duncan ND. Volek JS. Putukian M. Sebastianelli WJ.

Institution

The Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, Ind 47306, USA. wkraemer@bsu.edu

Title


Influence of compression therapy on symptoms following soft tissue injury from maximal eccentric exercise.

Source


Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. 31(6):282-90, 2001 Jun.

Abstract


STUDY DESIGN: A between groups design was used to compare recovery following eccentric muscle damage under 2 experimental conditions. OBJECTIVE: To determine if a compression sleeve donned immediately after maximal eccentric exercise would enhance recovery of physical function and decrease symptoms of soreness. BACKGROUND: Prior investigations using ice, intermittent compression, or exercise have not shown efficacy in relieving symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). To date, no study has shown the effect of continuous compression on DOMS, yet this would offer a low cost intervention for patients suffering with the symptoms of DOMS. METHODS AND MEASURES: Twenty nonimpaired non-strength-trained women participated in the study. Subjects were matched for age, anthropometric data, and one repetition maximum concentric arm curl strength and then randomly placed into a control group (n = 10) or an experimental compression sleeve group (n = 10). Subjects were instructed to avoid pain-relieving modalities (eg, analgesic medications, ice) throughout the study. The experimental group wore a compressive sleeve garment for 5 days following eccentric exercise. Subjects performed 2 sets of 50 passive arm curls with the dominant arm on an isokinetic dynamometer with a maximal eccentric muscle action superimposed every fourth passive repetition. One repetition maximum elbow flexion, upper arm circumference, relaxed elbow angle, blood serum cortisol, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and perception of soreness questionnaires were collected prior to the exercise bout and daily thereafter for 5 days. RESULTS: Creatine kinase was significantly elevated from the baseline value in both groups, although the experimental compression test group showed decreased magnitude of creatine kinase elevation following the eccentric exercise. Compression sleeve use prevented loss of elbow motion, decreased perceived soreness, reduced swelling, and promoted recovery of force production. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study underline the importance of compression in soft tissue injury management.

<28>

Unique Identifier

12188091

Authors


Orchard J.

Title


Understanding some of the risks for soft tissue inury--a Malcolm Blight legacy?.

Source


Journal of Science & Medicine in Sport. 5(2):v-vii, 2002 Jun.

<29>

Unique Identifier

7799761

Authors


Herzog RJ.

Institution

Hospital of The University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia 19104.

Title


Efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. [Review] [30 refs]

Source


Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 26(10):1193-202, 1994 Oct.

Abstract


Elbow dysfunction is usually related to acute or chronic injury to the soft tissue components of the elbow. Prior to the development and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiologic evaluation of the elbow was primarily limited to the detection of osseous abnormalities. The value of MRI to accurately determine the nature and extent of the pathologic changes in ligaments, tendons, muscles, and the osseous structures of the elbow joint is presented in the following discussion. [References: 30]

<30>

Unique Identifier

11782645

Authors


Labella CR. Smith BW. Sigurdsson A.

Institution

Division of Sports Medicine and Department of Endodontics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Title


Effect of mouthguards on dental injuries and concussions in college basketball.

Source


Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 34(1):41-4, 2002 Jan.

Abstract


PURPOSE: Dental injuries can be permanent and disfiguring. They are also universally expensive to treat. Many dentists, sports physicians, and athletic trainers recommend mouthguards for athletes participating in certain competitive sports, including men's college basketball, because of a common perception that mouthguards afford protection from dental injuries, and even some concussions. However, there are few reliable reports of the incidence of dental injuries and concussions in men's college basketball, and good evidence that mouthguards reduce the risk of these injuries in this population of athletes is notably lacking. This study prospectively recorded dental injuries and concussions among 50 men's Division I college basketball teams during one competitive season, then compared injury rates between mouthguard users and nonusers. METHODS: During the 1999 to 2000 basketball season, athletic trainers from 50 men's Division I college basketball programs used an Internet Web site to submit weekly reports of the number of athlete exposures, mouthguard users, concussions, oral soft tissue injuries, dental injuries, and dentist referrals. RESULTS: Response rate was 86%. There were 70,936 athlete exposures. Athletes using custom-fitted mouthguards accounted for 8663 exposures. Injury rates were expressed as number of injuries per 1000 athlete exposures. There were no significant differences between mouthguard users and nonusers in rates of concussions (0.35 vs 0.55) or oral soft tissue injuries (0.69 vs 1.06). Mouthguard users had significantly lower rates of dental injuries (0.12 vs 0.67; P < 0.05) and dentist referrals (0.00 vs 0.72; P < 0.05) than nonusers. CONCLUSION: Custom-fitted mouthguards do not significantly affect rates of concussions or oral soft tissue injuries, but can significantly reduce the morbidity and expense resulting from dental injuries in men's Division I college basketball.

<31>

Unique Identifier

12483953

Authors


Perryman JR. Hershman EB.

Institution

Lenox Hill Hospital, 130 East 77th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Title


The acute management of soft tissue injuries of the knee. [Review] [53 refs]

Source


Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 33(3):575-85, 2002 Jul.

Abstract


The acute management of soft tissue injuries of the knee requires knowledge of the injury mechanism, physical findings, and results of adjunctive tests. Knee dislocations, fractures, and extensive soft tissue injury requires immediate and thoughtful treatment. All injuries are afforded the benefit of the basic principles of rest, ice, compression, and elevation until definitive treatment is carried out. [References: 53]

<32>

Unique Identifier

12483951

Authors


Scopp JM. Moorman CT 3rd.

Institution

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Maryland Medical Center, 22 South Greene St. 11th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. JScoppMD@yahoo.com

Title


Acute athletic trauma to the hip and pelvis. [Review] [30 refs]

Source


Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 33(3):555-63, 2002 Jul.

Abstract


Athletic trauma to the hip and pelvis is rare; however, as football players hit harder and skiers ski faster, the incidence of high-energy hip and pelvis trauma can be expected to increase. As the energy of the injury increases, so do the associated risks. Therefore, a thorough understanding of on-field recognition and management is a necessary addition to the armamentarium of the sports medicine physician. [References: 30]

<33>

Unique Identifier

7777634

Authors


McCoy RL 2nd. Dec KL. McKeag DB. Honing EW.

Institution

Arizona State University, Phoenix, USA.

Title


Common injuries in the child or adolescent athlete. [Review] [41 refs]

Source


Primary Care; Clinics in Office Practice. 22(1):117-44, 1995 Mar.

Abstract


As more primary care physicians enter the field of Sports Medicine, they will inevitably encounter more injured young athletes than what they may have experienced in their private practices. Recognizing the differences that exist between the young athlete and adult is essential in properly diagnosing and rehabilitating these athletes. As mentioned in our previous article (Caring for the School-Aged Athlete, Primary Care, December 1994), comprehensive care of the young athlete can be quite involved and somewhat different from care of the adult population. This article focuses on some specific injuries unique to younger, skeletally immature athletes, while mentioning the differential diagnosis of some of the other common sports injuries shared by both younger and older athletes. [References: 41]

<34>

Unique Identifier

8717112

Authors


El-Khoury GY. Brandser EA. Kathol MH. Tearse DS. Callaghan JJ.

Institution

Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City 52242-1077, USA.

Title


Imaging of muscle injuries. [Review] [26 refs]

Source


Skeletal Radiology. 25(1):3-11, 1996 Jan.

Abstract


Although skeletal muscle is the single largest tissue in the body, there is little written about it in the radiologic literature. Indirect muscle injuries, also called strains or tears, are common in athletics, and knowing the morphology and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit is the key to the understanding of these injuries. Eccentric muscle activation produces more tension within the muscle than when it is activated concentrically, making it more susceptible to tearing. Injuries involving the muscle belly tend to occur near the myotendinous junction. In adolescents, the weakest link in the muscle-tendon-bone complex is the apophysis. Traditionally, plain radiography has been the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of these injuries; however, with the advent of MRI it has become much easier to diagnose injuries primarily affecting the soft tissues. This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the muscle-tendon unit as they relate to indirect muscle injuries. Examples of common muscle injuries are illustrated. [References: 26]

<35>

Unique Identifier

8898456

Authors


Staples J. Clement D.

Institution

Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre, Division of Sports Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Title


Hyperbaric oxygen chambers and the treatment of sports injuries. [Review] [78 refs]

Source


Sports Medicine. 22(4):219-27, 1996 Oct.

Abstract


Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, an established therapeutic intervention in diving medicine, is being investigated in wound management, where oxygen is an integral part of the healing process. Currently, the evidence is controversial as to whether there is a basis for using hyperbaric oxygen in normal wounds. This review explains the rationale for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and reports on the initial research in the area of hyperbaric oxygen in sports-induced injury. In addition to the increased dissolved content of oxygen in the plasma, the combination of pressure and oxygen seems to promote systemic vasoconstriction and yet inhibition of vasoconstriction in the injured area, which will limit oedema. The safety of hyperbaric oxygen in otherwise healthy athletes is examined. Potential contraindications to hyperbaric oxygen therapy include individuals who are febrile, suffer from upper respiratory infections, or have suffered a trauma to the chest where a pneumothorax is suspected or have a predisposition to tension pneumothorax. The initial human and animal model studies have shown promising, and in some instances significant, acceleration of healing. The potential benefits for sports injuries appear to be a blunting of initial injury, possibly by controlling the neutrophil adhesion and release of oxygen free radicals as well as an enhancement of healing processes requiring oxygen-like collagen formation phagocytosis. [References: 78]
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