User Plane Protocols Patrick Fischer, SeungJune Yi, SungDuck Chun and



tải về 336.41 Kb.
Chế độ xem pdf
trang1/2
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu27.09.2022
Kích336.41 Kb.
#53322
  1   2
LTE UserPlane



4
User Plane Protocols
Patrick Fischer, SeungJune Yi, SungDuck Chun and
YoungDae Lee
4.1 Introduction to the User Plane Protocol Stack
The LTE Layer 2 user-plane protocol stack is composed of three sublayers, as shown in
Figure 4.1:

The Packet Data Convergence Protocol (PDCP) layer [1]: This layer processes
Radio Resource Control (RRC) messages in the control plane and Internet Protocol
(IP) packets in the user plane. Depending on the radio bearer, the main functions of the
PDCP layer are header compression, security (integrity protection and ciphering), and
support for reordering and retransmission during handover. For radio bearers which are
configured to use the PDCP layer, there is one PDCP entity per radio bearer.

The Radio Link Control (RLC) layer [2]: The main functions of the RLC layer are
segmentation and reassembly of upper layer packets in order to adapt them to the size
which can actually be transmitted over the radio interface. For radio bearers which
need error-free transmission, the RLC layer also performs retransmission to recover
from packet losses. Additionally, the RLC layer performs reordering to compensate for
out-of-order reception due to Hybrid Automatic Repeat reQuest (HARQ) operation in
the layer below. There is one RLC entity per radio bearer.

The Medium Access Control (MAC) layer [3]: This layer performs multiplexing
of data from different radio bearers. Therefore there is only one MAC entity per UE.
By deciding the amount of data that can be transmitted from each radio bearer and
instructing the RLC layer as to the size of packets to provide, the MAC layer aims
to achieve the negotiated Quality of Service (QoS) for each radio bearer. For the
Stefania Sesia, Issam Toufik and Matthew Baker.
LTE – The UMTS Long Term Evolution: From Theory to Practice, Second Edition.
© 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
88
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
uplink, this process includes reporting to the eNodeB the amount of buffered data for
transmission.
MAC layer
RLC #1
HARQ #1
HARQ #2
...
RLC #2
RLC #3
...
PDCP #1
PDCP #2
PDCP #3
...
RRC
Application #1
NAS
Access 
Stratum
Non-
Access 
Stratum
Control plane
User plane
Physical layer
HARQ #3
Figure 4.1: Overview of user-plane architecture.
At the transmitting side, each layer receives a Service Data Unit (SDU) from a higher
layer, for which the layer provides a service, and outputs a Protocol Data Unit (PDU) to the
layer below. The RLC layer receives packets from the PDCP layer. These packets are called
PDCP PDUs from a PDCP point of view and represent RLC SDUs from an RLC point of
view. The RLC layer creates packets which are provided to the layer below, i.e. the MAC
layer. The packets provided by RLC to the MAC layer are RLC PDUs from an RLC point
of view, and MAC SDUs from a MAC point of view. At the receiving side, the process is
reversed, with each layer passing SDUs up to the layer above, where they are received as
PDUs.
An important design feature of the LTE protocol stack is that all the PDUs and SDUs are
byte aligned.
1
This is to facilitate handling by microprocessors, which are normally defined
to handle packets in units of bytes. In order to further reduce the processing requirements of
the user plane protocol stack in LTE, the headers created by each of the PDCP, RLC and MAC
layers are also byte-aligned. This implies that sometimes unused padding bits are needed in
the headers, and thus the cost of designing for efficient processing is that a small amount of
potentially-available capacity is wasted.
1
Byte alignment means that the lengths of the PDUs and SDUs are multiples of 8 bits.


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
89
4.2 Packet Data Convergence Protocol (PDCP)
4.2.1 Functions and Architecture
The PDCP layer performs the following functions:
• Header compression and decompression for user plane data;
• Security functions:
– ciphering and deciphering for user plane and control plane data;
– integrity protection and verification for control plane data;
• Handover support functions:
– in-sequence delivery and reordering of PDUs for the layer above at handover;
– lossless handover for user plane data mapped on RLC Acknowledged Mode (AM,
see Section 4.3.1).
• Discard for user plane data due to timeout.
The PDCP layer manages data streams in the user plane, as well as in the control plane
(i.e. the RRC protocol – see Section 3.2), only for the radio bearers using either a Dedicated
Control CHannel (DCCH) or a Dedicated Transport CHannel (DTCH) — see Section 4.4.1.2.
The architecture of the PDCP layer differs for user plane data and control plane data, as shown
in Figures 4.2 and 4.3 respectively.
Figure 4.2: Overview of user-plane PDCP. Reproduced by permission of © 3GPP.
90
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
Figure 4.3: Overview of control-plane PDCP. Reproduced by permission of © 3GPP.
Each of the main functions is explained in the following subsections. Two different types
of PDCP PDU are defined in LTE: PDCP Data PDUs and PDCP Control PDUs. PDCP Data
PDUs are used for both control and user plane data. PDCP Control PDUs are only used
to transport the feedback information for header compression, and for PDCP status reports
which are used in case of handover (see Section 4.2.6) and hence are only used within the
user plane.
4.2.2 Header Compression
One of the main functions of PDCP is header compression using the RObust Header
Compression (ROHC) protocol defined by the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force). In
LTE, header compression is very important because there is no support for the transport
of voice services via the Circuit-Switched (CS) domain.
2
Thus, in order to provide voice
services on the Packet-Switched (PS) domain in a way that comes close to the efficiency
normally associated with CS services it is necessary to compress the IP/UDP/RTP
3
header
which is typically used for Voice over IP (VoIP) services.
The IETF specifies in ‘RFC 4995’
4
a framework which supports a number of different
header compression ‘profiles’ (i.e. sets of rules and parameters for performing the compres-
sion). The header compression profiles supported for LTE are shown in Table 4.1. This means
that a UE may implement one or more of these ROHC profiles. It is important to notice that
the profiles already defined in the IETF’s earlier ‘RFC 3095’ have been redefined in RFC
4995 in order to increase robustness in some cases. The efficiency of RFC 3095 and RFC
4995 is similar, and UMTS
5
supports only RFC 3095.
2
LTE does, however, support a CS FallBack (CSFB) procedure to allow an LTE UE to be handed over to a legacy
RAT to originate a CS voice call, as well as a Single Radio Voice Call Continuity (SRVCC) procedure to hand over
a Packet-Switched (PS) VoIP call to a CS voice call – see Sections 2.4.2.1 and 2.4.2.2.
3
Internet Protocol / User Datagram Protocol / Real-Time Transport Protocol.
4
Requests for Comments (RFCs) capture much of the output of the IETF.
5
Universal Mobile Telecommunications System.


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
91
Table 4.1: Supported header compression protocols.
Reference
Usage
RFC 4995
No compression
RFC 3095, RFC 4815
RTP/UDP/IP
RFC 3095, RFC 4815
UDP/IP
RFC 3095, RFC 4815
ESP/IP
RFC 3843, RFC 4815
IP
RFC 4996
TCP/IP
RFC 5225
RTP/UDP/IP
RFC 5225
UDP/IP
RFC 5225
ESP/IP
RFC 5225
IP
The support of ROHC is not mandatory for the UE, except for those UEs which support
VoIP. UEs which support VoIP have to support at least one profile for compression of RTP,
UDP and IP.
6
The eNodeB controls by RRC signalling which of the ROHC profiles supported
by the UE are allowed to be used. The ROHC compressors in the UE and the eNodeB then
dynamically detect IP flows that use a certain IP header configuration and choose a suitable
compression profile from the allowed and supported profiles.
ROHC header compression operates by allowing both the sender and the receiver to store
the static parts of the header (e.g. the IP addresses of the sender/receiver), and to update these
only when they change. Furthermore, dynamic parts (for example, the timestamp in the RTP
header) are compressed by transmitting only the difference from a reference clock maintained
in both the transmitter and the receiver.
As the non-changing parts of the headers are thus transmitted only once, successful
decompression depends on their correct reception. Feedback is therefore used in order to
confirm the correct reception of initialization information for the header decompression. Fur-
thermore, the correct decompression of the received PDCP PDUs is confirmed periodically,
depending on the experienced packet losses.
As noted above, the most important use case for ROHC is VoIP. Typically, for the transport
of a VoIP packet which contains a payload of 32 bytes, the header added will be 60 bytes for
the case of IPv6 and 40 bytes for the case of IPv4
7
– i.e. an overhead of 188% and 125%
respectively. By means of ROHC, after the initialization of the header compression entities,
this overhead can be compressed to four to six bytes, and thus to a relative overhead of
12.5–18.8%. This calculation is valid during the active periods, but during silence periods
the payload size is smaller so the relative overhead is higher.
6
ROHC is required for VoIP supported via the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS); in theory it could be possible to
support raw IP VoIP without implementing ROHC.
7
IPv6 is the successor to the original IPv4, for many years the dominant version of IP used on the Internet, and
introduces a significantly expanded address space.
92
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
4.2.3 Security
The security architecture of LTE was introduced in Section 3.2.3.1. The implementation of
security, by ciphering (of both control plane (RRC) data and user plane data) and integrity
protection (for control plane (RRC) data only), is the responsibility of the PDCP layer.
A PDCP Data PDU counter (known as ‘COUNT’ in the LTE specifications) is used as an
input to the security algorithms. The COUNT value is incremented for each PDCP Data PDU
during an RRC connection; it has a length of 32 bits in order to allow an acceptable duration
for an RRC connection.
During an RRC connection, the COUNT value is maintained by both the UE and
the eNodeB by counting each transmitted/received PDCP Data PDU. In order to provide
robustness against lost packets, each protected PDCP Data PDU includes a PDCP Sequence
Number (SN) which corresponds to the least significant bits of the COUNT value.
8
Thus if
one or more packets are lost, the correct COUNT value of a newly received packet can be
determined using the PDCP SN. This means that the associated COUNT value is the next
highest COUNT value for which the least significant bits correspond to the PDCP SN. A
loss of synchronization of the COUNT value between the UE and eNodeB can then only
occur if a number of packets corresponding to the maximum SN are lost consecutively. In
principle, the probability of this kind of loss of synchronization occurring could be minimized
by increasing the length of the SN, even to the extent of transmitting the whole COUNT value
in every PDCP Data PDU. However, this would cause a high overhead, and therefore only the
least significant bits are used as the SN; the actual SN length depends on the configuration
and type of PDU, as explained in the description of the PDCP PDU formats in Section 4.2.6.
This use of a counter is designed to protect against a type of attack known as a replay
attack, where the attacker tries to resend a packet that has been intercepted previously; the
use of the COUNT value also provides protection against attacks which aim at deriving the
used key or ciphering pattern by comparing successive patterns. Due to the use of the COUNT
value, even if the same packet is transmitted twice, the ciphering pattern will be completely
uncorrelated between the two transmissions, thus preventing possible security breaches.
Integrity protection is realized by adding a field known as ‘Message Authentication Code
for Integrity’ (MAC-I)
9
to each RRC message. This code is calculated based on the Access
Stratum (AS) derived keys (see Section 3.2.3.1), the message itself, the radio bearer ID, the
direction (i.e. uplink or downlink) and the COUNT value.
If the integrity check fails, the message is discarded and the integrity check failure is
indicated to the RRC layer so that the RRC connection re-establishment procedure can be
executed (see Section 3.2.3.5).
Ciphering is realized by performing an XOR operation with the message and a ciphering
stream that is generated by the ciphering algorithm based on the AS derived keys (see
Section 3.2.3.1), the radio bearer ID, the direction (i.e. uplink or downlink), and the COUNT
value.
Ciphering can only be applied to PDCP Data PDUs. PDCP Control PDUs (such as ROHC
feedback or PDCP status reports) are neither ciphered nor integrity protected.
8
In order to avoid excessive overhead, the most significant bits of the COUNT value, also referred to as the Hyper
Frame Number (HFN), are not signalled but derived from counting overflows of the PDCP SN.
9
Note that the MAC-I has no relation to the MAC layer.


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
93
Except for identical retransmissions, the same COUNT value is not allowed to be used
more than once for a given security key. The eNodeB is responsible for avoiding reuse of
the COUNT with the same combination of radio bearer ID, AS base-key and algorithm. In
order to avoid such reuse, the eNodeB may for example use different radio bearer IDs for
successive radio bearer establishments, trigger an intracell handover or trigger a UE state
transition from connected to idle and back to connected again (see Section 3.2).
4.2.4 Handover
Handover is performed when the UE moves from the coverage of one cell to the coverage of
another cell in RRC_CONNECTED state. Depending on the required QoS, either a seamless
or a lossless handover is performed as appropriate for each user plane radio bearer, as
explained in the following subsections.
4.2.4.1 Seamless Handover
Seamless handover is applied for user plane radio bearers mapped on RLC Unacknowledged
Mode (UM, see Section 4.3.1). These types of data are typically reasonably tolerant of losses
but less tolerant of delay (e.g. voice services). Seamless handover is therefore designed to
minimize complexity and delay, but may result in loss of some SDUs.
At handover, for radio bearers to which seamless handover applies, the PDCP entities
including the header compression contexts are reset, and the COUNT values are set to zero.
As a new key is anyway generated at handover, there is no security reason to maintain the
COUNT values. PDCP SDUs in the UE for which the transmission has not yet started will
be transmitted after handover to the target cell. In the eNodeB, PDCP SDUs that have not
yet been transmitted can be forwarded via the X2 interface
10
to the target eNodeB. PDCP
SDUs for which the transmission has already started but that have not been successfully
received will be lost. This minimizes the complexity because no context (i.e. configuration
information) has to be transferred between the source and the target eNodeB at handover.
4.2.4.2 Lossless Handover
Based on the SN that is added to PDCP Data PDUs it is possible to ensure in-sequence deliv-
ery during handover, and even provide a fully lossless handover functionality, performing
retransmission of PDCP SDUs for which reception has not yet been acknowledged prior to
the handover. This lossless handover function is used mainly for delay-tolerant services such
as file downloads where the loss of one PDCP SDU can result in a drastic reduction in the
data rate due to the reaction of the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP).
Lossless handover is applied for user plane radio bearers that are mapped on RLC
Acknowledged Mode (AM, see Section 4.3.1).
For lossless handover, the header compression protocol is reset in the UE because
the header compression context is not forwarded from the source eNodeB to the target
eNodeB. However, the PDCP SNs and the COUNT values associated with PDCP SDUs are
maintained. For simplicity reasons, inter-eNodeB handover and intra-eNodeB handover are
handled in the same way in LTE.
10
For details of the X2 interface, see Section 2.6.
94
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
In normal transmission, while the UE is not handing over from one cell to another, the
RLC layer in the UE and the eNodeB ensures in-sequence delivery. PDCP PDUs that are
retransmitted by the RLC protocol, or that arrive out of sequence due to the variable delay in
the HARQ transmission, are reordered based on the RLC SN. At handover, the RLC layer in
the UE and in the eNodeB will deliver all PDCP PDUs that have already been received to the
PDCP layer in order to have them decompressed before the header compression protocol is
reset. Because some PDCP SDUs may not be available at this point, the PDCP SDUs that are
not available in-sequence are not delivered immediately to higher layers in the UE or to the
gateway in the network. In the PDCP layer, the PDCP SDUs received out of order are stored
in the reordering buffer (see Figure 4.2). PDCP SDUs that have been transmitted but not yet
been acknowledged by the RLC layer are stored in a retransmission buffer in the PDCP layer.
In order to ensure lossless handover in the uplink, the UE retransmits the PDCP SDUs
stored in the PDCP retransmission buffer. This is illustrated in Figure 4.4. In this example the
PDCP entity has initiated transmission for the PDCP SDUs with the sequence numbers 1 to 5;
the packets with the sequence numbers 3 and 5 have not been received by the source eNodeB,
for example due to the handover interrupting the HARQ retransmissions. After the handover,
the UE restarts the transmission of the PDCP SDUs for which successful transmission has
not yet been acknowledged to the target eNodeB. In the example in Figure 4.4 only the PDCP
SDUs 1 and 2 have been acknowledged prior to the handover. Therefore, after the handover
the UE will retransmit the packets 3, 4 and 5, although the network had already received
packet 4.
In order to ensure in-sequence delivery in the uplink, the source eNodeB, after decompres-
sion, delivers the PDCP SDUs that are received in-sequence to the gateway, and forwards
the PDCP SDUs that are received out-of-sequence to the target eNodeB. Thus, the target
eNodeB can reorder the decompressed PDCP SDUs received from the source eNodeB and
the retransmitted PDCP SDUs received from the UE based on the PDCP SNs which are
maintained during the handover, and deliver them to the gateway in the correct sequence.
In order to ensure lossless handover in the downlink, the source eNodeB forwards the
uncompressed PDCP SDUs for which reception has not yet been acknowledged by the UE
to the target eNodeB for retransmission in the downlink. The source eNodeB receives an
indication from the gateway that indicates the last packet sent to the source eNodeB. The
source eNodeB also forwards this indication to the target eNodeB so that the target eNodeB
knows when it can start transmission of packets received from the gateway. In the example in
Figure 4.5, the source eNodeB has started the transmission of the PDCP SDUs 1 to 4; due to,
for example, a handover occurring prior to the HARQ retransmissions of packet 3, packet 3
will not be received by the UE from the source eNodeB. Furthermore the UE has only sent
an acknowledgment for packets 1 and 2, although packet 4 has been received by the UE. The
target eNodeB then ensures that the PDCP SDUs that have not yet been acknowledged in the
source eNodeB are sent to the UE. Thus, the UE can reorder the received PDCP SDUs and
the PDCP SDUs that are stored in the reordering buffer, and deliver them to higher layers in
sequential order.
The UE will expect the packets from the target eNodeB in ascending order of SNs. In
the case of a packet not being forwarded from the source eNodeB to the target eNodeB,
i.e. when one of the packets that the UE expects is missing during the handover operation,
the UE can immediately conclude that the packet is lost and can forward the packets which
have already been received in sequence to higher layers. This avoids the UE having to retain


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
95
z–œ™ŠŒG
Œu–‹Œi
Gateway
{ˆ™ŽŒ›G
Œu–‹Œi
UE
UE
Handover
2
1
6
6
5
4
3
...
1
2
3
4
hŠ’•–ž“Œ‹ŽŒšG —ˆŠ’Œ›šGXGˆ•‹GY
1
2
4
wˆŠ’Œ›šGXSG
YSGZSG[Gˆ•‹G
\GˆŒG
‰ŒŒ•G
›™ˆ•š”››Œ‹
4
6
5
4
3
...
wˆŠ’Œ›šGZG
ˆ•‹G[Gˆ™ŒG
™Œ›™ˆ•š”››Œ‹S
ˆ“›–œŽG
—ˆŠ’Œ›G[GˆšG
ˆ“™Œˆ‹ G‰ŒŒ•G
™ŒŠŒŒ‹
3
5
5
6
4
3
5
Figure 4.4: Lossless handover in the uplink.
already-received packets in order to wait for a potential retransmission. Thus the forwarding
of the packets in the network can be decided without informing the UE.
In some cases it may happen that a PDCP SDU has been successfully received, but a
corresponding RLC acknowledgement has not. In this case, after the handover, there may be
unnecessary retransmissions initiated by the UE or the target eNodeB based on the incorrect
status received by the RLC layer. In order to avoid these unnecessary retransmissions a PDCP
status report can be sent from the eNodeB to the UE and from the UE to the eNodeB as
described in Section 4.2.6. Additionally, a PDCP ‘Status Report’ can request retransmission
of PDCP SDUs which were correctly received but failed in header decompression. Whether
to send a PDCP status report after handover is configured independently for each radio bearer.
4.2.5 Discard of Data Packets
Typically, the data rate that is available on the radio interface is smaller than the data rate
available on the network interfaces (e.g. S1
11
). Thus, when the data rate of a given service is
higher than the data rate provided by the LTE radio interface, this leads to buffering in the
UE and in the eNodeB. This buffering allows the scheduler in the MAC layer some freedom
to vary the instantaneous data rate at the physical layer in order to adapt to the current radio
11
For details of the S1 interface, see Section 2.5.
96
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
z–œ™ŠŒG
Œu–‹Œi
Gateway
{ˆ™ŽŒ›G
Œu–‹Œi
UE
UE
Handover
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
...
1
2
3
4
hŠ’•–ž“Œ‹ŽŒšG —ˆŠ’Œ›šGXGˆ•‹GY
1
2
4
wˆŠ’Œ›šGXSGYGˆ•‹G[Gˆ™ŒG
™ŒŠŒŒ‹
wˆŠ’Œ›šGXSG
YSGZGˆ•‹G[G
ˆŒG‰ŒŒ•G
›™ˆ•š”››Œ‹
p•‹Šˆ›ŒšG
ˈ“ˆš›G—ˆŠ’Œ›ˉ
3
4
5
3
4
5
6
...
wˆŠ’Œ›šGZG
ˆ•‹G[Gˆ™ŒG
™Œ›™ˆ•š”››Œ‹SG
ˆ“›–œŽG
—ˆŠ’Œ›G[GˆšG
ˆ“™Œˆ‹ G‰ŒŒ•G
™ŒŠŒŒ‹
LP
LP
Figure 4.5: Lossless handover in the downlink.
channel conditions. Thanks to the buffering, the variations in the instantaneous data rate are
then seen by the application only as some jitter in the transfer delay.
However, when the data rate provided by the application exceeds the data rate provided
by the radio interface for a long period, large amounts of buffered data can result. This may
lead to a large loss of data at handover if lossless handover is not applied to the bearer, or to
an excessive delay for real time applications.
In the fixed internet, one of the roles typically performed by the routers is to drop packets
when the data rate of an application exceeds the available data rate in a part of the internet. An
application may then detect this loss of packets and adapt its data rate to the available rate. A
typical example is the TCP transmit window handling, where the transmit window of TCP is
reduced when a lost packet is detected, thus adapting to the available rate. Other applications
such as video or voice calls via IP can also detect lost packets, for example via RTCP (Real-
time Transport Control Protocol) feedback, and can adapt the data rate accordingly.
In order to allow these mechanisms to work, and to prevent excessive delay, a discard
function is included in the PDCP layer for LTE. This discard function is based on a timer,
where for each PDCP SDU received from the higher layers in the transmitter a timer is
started, and when the transmission of the PDCP SDU has not yet been initiated in the UE at
the expiry of this timer the PDCP SDU is discarded. If the timer is set to an appropriate value


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
97
for the required QoS of the radio bearer, this discard mechanism can prevent excessive delay
and queuing in the transmitter.
4.2.6 PDCP PDU Formats
PDCP PDUs for user plane data comprise a ‘D/C’ field in order to distinguish Data and
Control PDUs, the formats of which are shown in Figures 4.6 and 4.7 respectively. PDCP
Data PDUs comprise a 7- or 12-bit SN as shown in Table 4.2. PDCP Data PDUs for user plane
data contain either an uncompressed (if header compression is not used) or a compressed IP
packet.
D/C
PDCP SN
Data
MAC-I
Figure 4.6: Key features of PDCP Data PDU format. See Table 4.2 for presence of D/C and
MAC-I fields.
Table 4.2: PDCP Data PDU formats.
Sequence
Applicable RLC Modes
PDU type
D/C field
number length
MAC-I
(see Section 4.3.1)
User plane long SN
Present
12 bits
Absent
AM / UM
User plane short SN
Present
7 bits
Absent
UM
Control plane
Absent
5 bits
32 bits
AM
D/C
PDU type
Interspersed ROHC feedback /
PDCP status report
Figure 4.7: Key features of PDCP Control PDU format.
PDCP Data PDUs for control plane data (i.e. RRC signalling) comprise a MAC-I field of
32-bit length for integrity protection. PDCP Data PDUs for control plane data contain one
complete RRC message.
As can be seen in Table 4.2 there are three types of PDCP Data PDU, distinguished
mainly by the length of the PDCP SN and the presence of the MAC-I field. As mentioned
in Section 4.2.3, the length of the PDCP SN in relation to the data rate, the packet size
and the packet inter-arrival rate determines the maximum possible interruption time without
desynchronizing the COUNT value which is used for ciphering and integrity protection.
98
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
The PDCP Data PDU for user plane data using the long SN allows longer interruption
times, and makes it possible, when it is mapped on RLC Acknowledged Mode (AM) (see
Section 4.3.1.3), to perform lossless handover as described in Section 4.2.4, but implies a
higher overhead. Therefore it is mainly used for data applications with a large IP packet size
where the overhead compared to the packet size is not too significant, for example for file
transfer, web browsing, or e-mail traffic.
The PDCP Data PDU for user plane data using the short SN is mapped on RLC
Unacknowledged Mode (UM) (see Section 4.3.1.2) and is typically used for VoIP services,
where only seamless handover is used and retransmission is not necessary.
PDCP Control PDUs are used by PDCP entities handling user plane data (see Figure 4.1).
There are two types of PDCP Control PDU, distinguished by the PDU Type field in the PDCP
header. PDCP Control PDUs carry either PDCP ‘Status Reports’ for the case of lossless
handover, or ROHC feedback created by the ROHC header compression protocol. PDCP
Control PDUs carrying ROHC feedback are used for user plane radio bearers mapped on
either RLC UM or RLC AM, while PDCP Control PDUs carrying PDCP Status Reports are
used only for user plane radio bearers mapped on RLC AM.
In order to reduce complexity, a PDCP Control PDU carrying ROHC feedback carries
exactly one ROHC feedback packet – there is no possibility to transmit several ROHC
feedback packets in one PDCP PDU.
A PDCP Control PDU carrying a PDCP Status Report for the case of lossless handover
is used to prevent the retransmission of already-correctly-received PDCP SDUs, and also to
request retransmission of PDCP SDUs which were correctly received but for which header
decompression failed. This PDCP Control PDU contains a bitmap indicating which PDCP
SDUs need to be retransmitted and a reference SN, the First Missing SDU (FMS). In the case
that all PDCP SDUs have been received in sequence this field indicates the next expected SN,
and no bitmap is included.
4.3 Radio Link Control (RLC)
The RLC layer is located between the PDCP layer (the ‘upper’ layer) and the MAC layer (the
‘lower’ layer). It communicates with the PDCP layer through a Service Access Point (SAP),
and with the MAC layer via logical channels. The RLC layer reformats PDCP PDUs in order
to fit them into the size indicated by the MAC layer; that is, the RLC transmitter segments
and/or concatenates the PDCP PDUs, and the RLC receiver reassembles the RLC PDUs to
reconstruct the PDCP PDUs.
In addition, the RLC reorders the RLC PDUs if they are received out of sequence due to the
HARQ operation performed in the MAC layer. This is the key difference from UMTS, where
the HARQ reordering is performed in the MAC layer. The advantage of HARQ reordering in
RLC is that no additional SN and reception buffer are needed for HARQ reordering. In LTE,
the RLC SN and RLC reception buffer are used for both HARQ reordering and RLC-level
ARQ related operations.
The functions of the RLC layer are performed by ‘RLC entities’. An RLC entity is con-
figured in one of three data transmission modes: Transparent Mode (TM), Unacknowledged
Mode (UM), and Acknowledged Mode (AM). In AM, special functions are defined to support
retransmission. When UM or AM is used, the choice between the two modes is made by


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
99
the eNodeB during the RRC radio bearer setup procedure (see Section 3.2.3.3), based on the
QoS requirements of the EPS bearer.
12
The three RLC modes are described in detail in the
following sections.
4.3.1 RLC Entities
4.3.1.1 Transparent Mode (TM) RLC Entity
As the name indicates, the TM RLC entity is transparent to the PDUs that pass through it –
no functions are performed and no RLC overhead is added. Since no overhead is added, an
RLC SDU is directly mapped to an RLC PDU and vice versa. Therefore, the use of TM RLC
is very restricted. Only RRC messages which do not need RLC configuration can utilize the
TM RLC, such as broadcast System Information (SI) messages, paging messages, and RRC
messages which are sent when no Signalling Radio Bearers (SRBs) other than SRB0 (see
Section 3.2.1) are available. TM RLC is not used for user plane data transmission in LTE.
TM RLC provides a unidirectional data transfer service – in other words, a single TM
RLC entity is configured either as a transmitting TM RLC entity or as a receiving TM RLC
entity.
4.3.1.2 Unacknowledged Mode (UM) RLC Entity
UM RLC provides a unidirectional data transfer service like TM RLC. UM RLC is
mainly utilized by delay-sensitive and error-tolerant real-time applications, especially VoIP,
and other delay-sensitive streaming services. Point-to-multipoint services such as MBMS
(Multimedia Broadcast/Multicast Service) also use UM RLC – since no feedback path is
available in the case of point-to-multipoint services, AM RLC cannot be utilized by these
services.
A block diagram of the UM RLC entity is shown in Figure 4.8.
The main functions of UM RLC can be summarized as follows:
• Segmentation and concatenation of RLC SDUs;
• Reordering of RLC PDUs;
• Duplicate detection of RLC PDUs;
• Reassembly of RLC SDUs.
Segmentation and concatenation. The transmitting UM RLC entity performs segmenta-
tion and/or concatenation on RLC SDUs received from upper layers, to form RLC PDUs. The
size of the RLC PDU at each transmission opportunity is decided and notified by the MAC
layer depending on the radio channel conditions and the available transmission resources;
therefore, the size of each transmitted RLC PDU can be different.
The transmitting UM RLC entity includes RLC SDUs into an RLC PDU in the order in
which they arrive at the UM RLC entity. Therefore, a single RLC PDU can contain RLC
SDUs or segments of RLC SDUs according to the following pattern:
(zero or one) SDU segment + (zero or more) SDUs + (zero or one) SDU segment.
12
Evolved Packet System – see Section 2.
100
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
!
!!"
"##"$$%!$%
&$&'$'(%()*'"
%'
!
#*'(%($'%()*'
)
%%'+')++)*'
,*--$%
&+,
&+,
&+,
"##"
$
!%
"##"
$
!%
,-.
&!/
)
%%'+')(()'&"
,-"
"##"$'()(0
)
%%'+1*%("
#.%''$2
"$($1()*'",*--$%"
%'
!
$!
"3
"$*%!$%)'&
"$'*4$"
"##"$$%!$%
&+,""$%++$'520
&+,
&+,
"##"
$
!%
"##"
$
!%
,-.
&!/
"$($)4)'&
,-"
"##"$'()(0
)
%%'+1*%("
#.%''$2
"%!)*"6'($%-%($
+)
#$7-##$7-)#$
Figure 4.8: Model of UM RLC entities. Reproduced by permission of © 3GPP.
The constructed RLC PDU is always byte-aligned and has no padding.
After segmentation and/or concatenation of RLC SDUs, the transmitting UM RLC entity
includes relevant UM RLC headers in the RLC PDU to indicate the sequence number
13
of
the RLC PDU, and additionally the size and boundary of each included RLC SDU or RLC
SDU segment.
Reordering, duplicate detection, and reassembly. When the receiving UM RLC entity
receives RLC PDUs, it first reorders them if they are received out of sequence. Out-of-
sequence reception is unavoidable due to the fact that the HARQ operation in the MAC layer
uses multiple HARQ processes (see Section 4.4). Any RLC PDUs received out of sequence
are stored in the reception buffer until all the previous RLC PDUs are received and delivered
to the upper layer.
During the reordering process, any duplicate RLC PDUs received are detected by checking
the SNs and discarded. This ensures that the upper layer receives upper layer PDUs only
once. The most common cause of receiving duplicates is HARQ ACKs for MAC PDUs being
misinterpreted as NACKs, resulting in unnecessary retransmissions of the MAC PDUs, which
causes duplication in the RLC layer.
To detect reception failures and avoid excessive reordering delays, a reordering timer is
used in the receiving UM RLC entity to set the maximum time to wait for the reception of
RLC PDUs that have not been received in sequence. The receiving UM RLC entity starts
13
Note that the RLC sequence number is independent from the sequence number added by PDCP.


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
101
the reordering timer when a missing RLC PDU is detected, and it waits for the missing RLC
PDUs until the timer expires. When the timer expires, the receiving UM RLC entity declares
the missing RLC PDUs as lost and starts to reassemble the next available RLC SDUs from
the RLC PDUs stored in the reception buffer.
The reassembly function is performed on an RLC SDU basis; only RLC SDUs for which
all segments are available are reassembled from the stored RLC PDUs and delivered to the
upper layers. RLC SDUs that have at least one missing segment are simply discarded and not
reassembled. If RLC SDUs were concatenated in an RLC PDU, the reassembly function in
the RLC receiver separates them into their original RLC SDUs. The RLC receiver delivers
reassembled RLC SDUs to the upper layers in increasing order of SNs.
An example scenario of a lost RLC PDU with HARQ reordering is shown in Figure 4.9.
A reordering timer is started when the RLC receiver receives PDU#8. If PDU#7 has not been
received before the timer expires, the RLC receiver decides that the PDU#7 is lost, and starts
to reassemble RLC SDUs from the next received RLC PDU. In this example, SDU#22 and
SDU#23 are discarded because they are not completely received, and SDU#24 is kept in the
reception buffer until all segments are received. Only SDU#21 is completely received, so it
is delivered up to the PDCP layer.
The reordering and duplicate detection functions are not applicable to RLC entities
using the Multicast Control CHannel (MCCH) or Multicast Traffic CHannel (MTCH) (see
Section 4.4.1.2). This is because the HARQ operation in the MAC layer is not used for these
channels.
4.3.1.3 Acknowledged Mode (AM) RLC Entity
In contrast to the other RLC transmission modes, AM RLC provides a bidirectional data
transfer service. Therefore, a single AM RLC entity is configured with the ability both to
transmit and to receive – we refer to the corresponding parts of the AM RLC entity as the
transmitting side and the receiving side respectively.
The most important feature of AM RLC is ‘retransmission’. An ARQ operation is
performed to support error-free transmission. Since transmission errors are corrected by
retransmissions, AM RLC is mainly utilized by error-sensitive and delay-tolerant non-real-
time applications. Examples of such applications include most of the interactive/background
type services, such as web browsing and file downloading. Streaming-type services also
frequently use AM RLC if the delay requirement is not too stringent. In the control
plane, RRC messages typically utilize the AM RLC in order to take advantage of RLC
acknowledgements and retransmissions to ensure reliability.
A block diagram of the AM RLC entity is shown in Figure 4.10.
Although the AM RLC block diagram looks complicated at first glance, the transmit-
ting and receiving sides are similar to the UM RLC transmitting and receiving entities
respectively, except for the retransmission-related blocks. Therefore, most of the UM RLC
behaviour described in the previous section applies to AM RLC in the same manner. The
transmitting side of the AM RLC entity performs segmentation and/or concatenation of
RLC SDUs received from upper layers to form RLC PDUs together with relevant AM RLC
headers, and the receiving side of the AM RLC entity reassembles RLC SDUs from the
received RLC PDUs after HARQ reordering.
102
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
SDU21
SDU22
SDU23
SDU24
PDU5
PDU6
PDU7
PDU8
PDU9
HARQ transmitter
HARQ 
process#1
HARQ
process#2
HARQ
process#3
HARQ 
process#4
HARQ 
process#5
HARQ receiver
HARQ 
process#1
HARQ
process#2
HARQ
process#3
HARQ 
process#4
HARQ 
process#5
Radio
Interface
PDU5
PDU6
PDU8
PDU9
SDU21
SDU22
SDU23
SDU
24
Time
Discard
Discard
RLC
receiver
RLC
transmitter
Timer start
Timer expiry
- Loss of PDU7 is detected
- Start to reassemble RLC SDUs
Deliver to PDCP layer
Store until complete 
segments are received
Figure 4.9: Example of PDU loss detection with HARQ reordering.
In addition to performing the functions of UM RLC, the main functions of AM RLC can
be summarized as follows:
• Retransmission of RLC Data PDUs;
• Re-segmentation of retransmitted RLC Data PDUs;
• Polling;
• Status reporting;
• Status prohibit.
Retransmission and resegmentation. As mentioned before, the most important function
of AM RLC is retransmission. In order that the transmitting side retransmits only the
missing RLC PDUs, the receiving side provides a ‘Status Report’ to the transmitting side
indicating ACK and/or NACK information for the RLC PDUs. Status reports are sent by


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
103
Add 
RLC header
Segmentation 
and
concatenation
Transmission
buffer
SDU
SDU
SDU
RLC
Hdr
RLC 
Hdr
AM-SAP
Retransmission 
buffer
RLC control
STATUS PDU
Reception Buffer
and
HARQ
reordering
Remove
RLC header
RLC 
Hdr
RLC
Hdr
Routing
SDU
reassembly
SDU
SDU
Transport channel : 
DCCH/DTCH
Transport channel : 
DCCH/DTCH
Figure 4.10: Model of AM RLC entity. Reproduced by permission of © 3GPP.
the transmitting side of the AM RLC entity whose receiving side received the corresponding
RLC PDUs. Hence, the AM RLC transmitting side is able to transmit two types of RLC PDU,
namely RLC Data PDUs containing data received from upper layers and RLC Control PDUs
generated in the AM RLC entity itself. To differentiate between Data and Control PDUs, a
1-bit flag is included in the AM RLC header (see Section 4.3.2.3).
When the transmitting side transmits RLC Data PDUs, it stores the PDUs in the
retransmission buffer for possible retransmission if requested by the receiver through a status
report. In case of retransmission, the transmitter can resegment the original RLC Data PDUs
into smaller PDU segments if the MAC layer indicates a size that is smaller than the original
RLC Data PDU size.
An example of RLC resegmentation is shown in Figure 4.11. In this example, an
original PDU of 600 bytes is resegmented into two PDU segments of 200 and 400 bytes
at retransmission.
The original RLC PDU is distinguished from the retransmitted segments by another 1-bit
flag in the AM RLC header: in the case of a retransmitted segment, some more fields are
included in the AM RLC header to indicate resegmentation related information. The receiver
can use status reports to indicate the status of individual retransmitted segments, not just
full PDUs.
104
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
i
Figure 4.11: Example of RLC resegmentation.
Polling, status report and status prohibit. The transmitting side of the AM RLC entity
can proactively request a status report from the peer receiving side by polling using a 1-bit
indicator in the AM RLC header. The transmitting side can then use the status reports to select
the RLC Data PDUs to be retransmitted, and manage transmission and retransmission buffers
efficiently. Typical circumstances in which the transmitting side may initiate a poll include,
for example, the last PDU in the transmitting side having been transmitted, or a predefined
number of PDUs or data bytes having been transmitted.
When the receiving side of the AM RLC entity receives a poll from the peer transmitting
side, it checks the reception buffer status and transmits a status report at the earliest
transmission opportunity.
The receiving side can also generate a status report of its own accord if it detects a
reception failure of an AM RLC PDU. For the detection of a reception failure, a similar
mechanism is used as in the case of UM RLC in relation to the HARQ reordering delay.
In AM RLC, however, the detection of a reception failure triggers a status report instead of
considering the relevant RLC PDUs as permanently lost.
Note that the transmission of status reports needs to be carefully controlled according to
the trade-off between transmission delay and radio efficiency. To reduce the transmission
delay, status reports need to be transmitted frequently, but on the other hand frequent
transmission of status reports wastes radio resources. Moreover, if further status reports
are sent whilst the retransmissions triggered by a previous status report have not yet been
received, unnecessary retransmissions may result, thus consuming further radio resources;
in AM RLC this is in fact a second cause of duplicate PDUs occurring which have to be
discarded by the duplicate-detection functionality. Therefore, to control the frequency of


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
105
status reporting in an effective way, a ‘status prohibit’ function is available in AM RLC,
whereby the transmission of new status reports is prohibited while a timer is running.
4.3.2 RLC PDU Formats
As mentioned above, the RLC layer provides two types of PDU, namely the RLC Data PDU
and the RLC Control PDU. The RLC Data PDU is used to transmit PDCP PDUs and is
defined in all RLC transmission modes. The RLC Control PDU delivers control information
between peer RLC entities and is defined only in AM RLC. The RLC PDUs used in each
RLC transmission mode are summarized in Table 4.3.
Table 4.3: PDU types used in RLC.
RLC Mode
Data PDU
Control PDU
TM
TMD (TM Data)
N/A
UM
UMD (UM Data)
N/A
AM
AMD (AM Data)/AMD segment
STATUS
In the following subsections, each of the RLC PDU formats is explained in turn.
4.3.2.1 Transparent Mode Data PDU Format
The Transparent Mode Data (TMD) PDU consists only of a data field and does not have any
RLC headers. Since no segmentation or concatenation is performed, an RLC SDU is directly
mapped to a TMD PDU.
4.3.2.2 Unacknowledged Mode Data PDU Format
The Unacknowledged Mode Data (UMD) PDU (Figure 4.12) consists of a data field and
UMD PDU header. PDCP PDUs (i.e. RLC SDUs) can be segmented and/or concatenated
into the data field. The UMD PDU header is further categorized into a fixed part (included
in each UMD PDU) and an extension part (included only when the data field contains more
than one SDU or SDU segment – i.e. only when the data field contains any SDU borders).
Figure 4.12: Key features of UMD PDU format.
106
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION

Framing Info (FI). This 2-bit field indicates whether the first and the last data field
elements are complete SDUs or partial SDUs (i.e. whether the receiving RLC entity
needs to receive multiple RLC PDUs in order to reassemble the corresponding SDU).

Sequence Number (SN). For UMD PDUs, either a short (5 bits) or a long (10 bits) SN
field can be used. This field allows the receiving RLC entity unambiguously to identify
a UMD PDU, which allows reordering and duplicate-detection to take place.

Length Indicator (LI). This 11-bit field indicates the length of the corresponding data
field element present in the UMD PDU. There is a one-to-one correspondence between
each LI and a data field element, except for the last data field element, for which the
LI field is omitted because its length can be deduced from the UMD PDU size.
4.3.2.3 Acknowledged Mode Data PDU Format
In addition to the UMD PDU header fields, the Acknowledged Mode Data (AMD) PDU
header (Figure 4.13) contains fields to support the RLC ARQ mechanism. The only difference
in the PDU fields is that only the long SN field (10 bits) is used for AMD PDUs. The
additional fields are as follows:

Data/Control (D/C). This 1-bit field indicates whether the RLC PDU is an RLC Data
PDU or an RLC Control PDU. It is present in all types of PDU used in AM RLC.

Resegmentation Flag (RF). This 1-bit field indicates whether the RLC PDU is an
AMD PDU or an AMD PDU segment.

Polling (P). This 1-bit field is used to request a status report from the peer receiving
side.
Data
SN
LI
LI
Fixed part
Extension part
D/C
RF
P
FI
Header
Figure 4.13: Key features of AMD PDU format.
4.3.2.4 AMD PDU Segment Format
The AMD PDU segment format (Figure 4.14) is used in case of resegmented retransmissions
(when the available resource for retransmission is smaller than the original PDU size), as
described in Section 4.3.1.3.
If the RF field indicates that the RLC PDU is an AMD PDU segment, the following
additional resegmentation related fields are included in the fixed part of the AMD PDU
header to enable correct reassembly:


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
107

Last Segment Flag (LSF). This 1-bit field indicates whether or not this AMD PDU
segment is the last segment of an AMD PDU.

Segmentation Offset (SO). This 15-bit field indicates the starting position of the AMD
PDU segment within the original AMD PDU.
Figure 4.14: Key features of AMD PDU segment format.
4.3.2.5 STATUS PDU Format
The STATUS PDU (Figure 4.15) is designed to be very simple, as the RLC PDU error rate
should normally be low in LTE due to the use of HARQ in the MAC layers. Therefore, the
STATUS PDU simply lists all the missing portions of AMD PDUs by means of the following
fields:

Control PDU Type (CPT). This 3-bit field indicates the type of the RLC Control
PDU, allowing more RLC Control PDU types to be defined in a later release of the
LTE specifications. (The STATUS PDU is the only type of RLC Control PDU defined
in the first version of LTE.)

ACK_SN. This 10-bit field indicates the SN of the first AMD PDU which is neither
received nor listed in this STATUS PDU. All AMD PDUs up to but not including this
AMD PDU are correctly received by the receiver except the AMD PDUs or portions
of AMD PDUs listed in the NACK_SN List.

NACK_SN List. This field contains a list of SNs of the AMD PDUs that have not been
completely received, optionally including indicators of which bytes of the AMD PDU
are missing in the case of resegmentation.
Figure 4.15: STATUS PDU format.
108
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
4.4 Medium Access Control (MAC)
The MAC layer is the lowest sublayer in the Layer 2 architecture of the LTE radio protocol
stack. The connection to the physical layer below is through transport channels, and the
connection to the RLC layer above is through logical channels. The MAC layer therefore
performs multiplexing and demultiplexing between logical channels and transport channels:
the MAC layer in the transmitting side constructs MAC PDUs, known as Transport Blocks
(TBs), from MAC SDUs received through logical channels, and the MAC layer in the
receiving side recovers MAC SDUs from MAC PDUs received through transport channels.
4.4.1 MAC Architecture
4.4.1.1 Overall Architecture
Figure 4.16 shows a conceptual overview of the architecture of the MAC layer.
/081
2934:5;9<"=>344?6:
7;8@936"=>344?6:
:;6<@56?A@48<=?>:;6<@56?A@48
B9
34<"C@84366@48
/081"C@84366@48
=;
4<9;66?9
=8D
C
9>?E;6@48
8
0=/"C@84366@48
2@F@48"0E?349?
8
34E;F"
099?::"
=;
4<9;6
7;8@936"=>344?6"@9@;9@<@G3<@;4
Figure 4.16: Conceptual overview of the UE-side MAC architecture.
The MAC layer consists of a HARQ entity, a multiplexing/demultiplexing entity, a logical
channel prioritization entity, a random access control entity, and a controller which performs
various control functions.
The HARQ entity is responsible for the transmit and receive HARQ operations. The
transmit HARQ operation includes transmission and retransmission of TBs, and reception
and processing of ACK/NACK signalling. The receive HARQ operation includes reception
of TBs, combining of the received data and generation of ACK/NACK signalling. In order
to enable continuous transmission while previous TBs are being decoded, up to eight HARQ
processes in parallel are used to support multiprocess ‘Stop-And-Wait’ (SAW) HARQ
operation.
SAW operation means that upon transmission of a TB, a transmitter stops further
transmissions and awaits feedback from the receiver. When a NACK is received, or when a
certain time elapses without receiving any feedback, the transmitter retransmits the TB. Such


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
109
a simple SAW HARQ operation cannot on its own utilize the transmission resources during
the period between the first transmission and the retransmission. Therefore multiprocess
HARQ interlaces several independent SAW processes in time so that all the transmission
resources can be used. Each HARQ process is responsible for a separate SAW operation and
manages a separate buffer.
In general, HARQ schemes can be categorized as either synchronous or asynchronous,
with the retransmissions in each case being either adaptive or non-adaptive.
In a synchronous HARQ scheme, the retransmission(s) for each process occur at
predefined times relative to the initial transmission. In this way, there is no need to signal
information such as HARQ process number, as this can be inferred from the transmission
timing. By contrast, in an asynchronous HARQ scheme, the retransmissions can occur at any
time relative to the initial transmission, so additional explicit signalling is required to indicate
the HARQ process number to the receiver, so that the receiver can correctly associate each
retransmission with the corresponding initial transmission. In summary, synchronous HARQ
schemes reduce the signalling overhead while asynchronous HARQ schemes allow more
flexibility in scheduling.
In an adaptive HARQ scheme, transmission attributes such as the Modulation and Coding
Scheme (MCS) and transmission resource allocation in the frequency domain can be changed
at each retransmission in response to variations in the radio channel conditions. In a non-
adaptive HARQ scheme, the retransmissions are performed without explicit signalling of
new transmission attributes – either by using the same transmission attributes as those of
the previous transmission, or by changing the attributes according to a predefined rule.
Accordingly, adaptive schemes bring more scheduling gain at the expense of increased
signalling overhead.
In LTE, asynchronous adaptive HARQ is used for the downlink, and synchronous HARQ
for the uplink. In the uplink, the retransmissions may be either adaptive or non-adaptive,
depending on whether new signalling of the transmission attributes is provided.
The details of the HARQ incremental redundancy schemes and timing for retransmissions
are explained in Section 10.3.2.5.
In the multiplexing and demultiplexing entity, data from several logical channels can be
(de)multiplexed into/from one transport channel. The multiplexing entity generates MAC
PDUs from MAC SDUs when radio resources are available for a new transmission, based
on the decisions of the logical channel prioritization entity. The demultiplexing entity
reassembles the MAC SDUs from MAC PDUs and distributes them to the appropriate
RLC entities. In addition, for peer-to-peer communication between the MAC layers, control
messages called ‘MAC Control Elements’ can be included in the MAC PDU as explained in
Section 4.4.2.7 below.
The logical channel prioritization entity prioritizes the data from the logical channels to
decide how much data and from which logical channel(s) should be included in each MAC
PDU, as explained in Section 4.4.2.6. The decisions are delivered to the multiplexing and
demultiplexing entity.
The random access control entity is responsible for controlling the Random Access
CHannel (RACH) procedure (see Section 4.4.2.3). The controller entity is responsible for
a number of functions including Discontinuous Reception (DRX) , the Data Scheduling
procedure, and for maintaining the uplink timing alignment. These functions are explained
in the following sections.
110
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
4.4.1.2 Logical Channels
The MAC layer provides a data transfer service for the RLC layer through logical channels,
which are either Control Logical Channels (for the transport of control data such as RRC
signalling), or Traffic Logical Channels (for user plane data).
Control logical channels.

Broadcast Control CHannel (BCCH). This is a downlink channel which is used to
broadcast System Information (SI) and any Public Warning System (PWS) messages
(see Section 13.7). In the RLC layer, it is associated with a TM RLC entity (see
Section 4.3.1).

Paging Control CHannel (PCCH). This is a downlink channel which is used to notify
UEs of an incoming call or a change of SI. In the RLC layer, it is associated with a TM
RLC entity (see Section 4.3.1).

Common Control CHannel (CCCH). This channel is used to deliver control
information in both uplink and downlink directions when there is no confirmed
association between a UE and the eNodeB – i.e. during connection establishment. In
the RLC layer, it is associated with a TM RLC entity (see Section 4.3.1).

Multicast Control CHannel (MCCH). This is a downlink channel which is used
to transmit control information related to the reception of MBMS services (see
Chapter 13). In the RLC layer, it is associated with a UM RLC entity (see Section 4.3.1).

Dedicated Control CHannel (DCCH). This channel is used to transmit dedicated
control information relating to a specific UE, in both uplink and downlink directions.
It is used when a UE has an RRC connection with eNodeB. In the RLC layer, it is
associated with an AM RLC entity (see Section 4.3.1).
Traffic logical channels.

Dedicated Traffic CHannel (DTCH). This channel is used to transmit dedicated user
data in both uplink and downlink directions. In the RLC layer, it can be associated with
either a UM RLC entity or an AM RLC entity (see Section 4.3.1).

Multicast Traffic CHannel (MTCH). This channel is used to transmit user data for
MBMS services in the downlink (see Chapter 13). In the RLC layer, it is associated
with a UM RLC entity (see Section 4.3.1).
4.4.1.3 Transport Channels
Data from the MAC layer is exchanged with the physical layer through transport channels.
Data is multiplexed into transport channels depending on how it is transmitted over the air.
Transport channels are classified as downlink or uplink as follows:


USER PLANE PROTOCOLS
111
Downlink transport channels.

Broadcast CHannel (BCH). This channel is used to transport the parts of the SI which
are essential for access the Downlink Shared CHannel (DL-SCH). The transport format
is fixed and the capacity is limited.

Downlink Shared CHannel (DL-SCH). This channel is used to transport downlink
user data or control messages. In addition, the remaining parts of the SI that are not
transported via the BCH are transported on the DL-SCH.

Paging CHannel (PCH). This channel is used to transport paging information to UEs,
and to inform UEs about updates of the SI (see Section 3.2.2) and PWS messages (see
Section 13.7).

Multicast CHannel (MCH). This channel is used to transport MBMS user data or
control messages that require MBSFN combining (see Chapter 13).
The mapping of the downlink transport channels onto physical channels is explained in
Section 6.4.
Uplink transport channels.

Uplink Shared CHannel (UL-SCH). This channel is used to transport uplink user
data or control messages.

Random Access CHannel (RACH). This channel is used for access to the network
when the UE does not have accurate uplink timing synchronization, or when the UE
does not have any allocated uplink transmission resource (see Chapter 17).
The mapping of the uplink transport channels onto physical channels is explained in
Chapter 16.
4.4.1.4 Multiplexing and Mapping between Logical Channels and Transport
Channels
Figures 4.17 and 4.18 show the possible multiplexing between logical channels and transport
channels in the downlink and uplink respectively.
Note that in the downlink, the DL-SCH carries information from all the logical channels
except the PCCH, MCCH and MTCH.
In the uplink, the UL-SCH carries information from all the logical channels.
4.4.2 MAC Functions
4.4.2.1 Scheduling
The scheduler in the eNodeB distributes the available radio resources in one cell among the
UEs, and among the radio bearers of each UE. The details of the scheduling algorithm are left
to the eNodeB implementation, but the signalling to support the scheduling is standardized.
Some possible scheduling algorithms are discussed in Chapter 12.
In principle, the eNodeB allocates downlink or uplink radio resources to each UE based
respectively on the downlink data buffered in the eNodeB and on Buffer Status Reports
112
LTE – THE UMTS LONG TERM EVOLUTION
H==
/
@==/
===
/
===/
=2=/
:==/
:2=/
H=
/
@=/
=7>C=/
:=/
!"#$%&$I
'"(&)*%"
)+*$$,%-
!"#$%&$I
./*$-0"/1"
)+*$$,%-
236<@56?A@48"4
=?F36<@56?A@48
236<@56?A@48"4
=?F36<@56?A@48
Figure 4.17: Downlink logical channel multiplexing. Reproduced by permission of © 3GPP.
CCCH
DCCH
DTCH
UL-SCH
RACH

tải về 336.41 Kb.

Chia sẻ với bạn bè của bạn:
  1   2




Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©hocday.com 2023
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương