TrưỜng đẠi học ngoại ngữ tin học thành phố HỒ chí minh khoa du lịch – khách sạN


Read the following passages and do the tasks that follow



tải về 336.39 Kb.
Chế độ xem pdf
trang2/6
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu07.01.2022
Kích336.39 Kb.
#50586
1   2   3   4   5   6
NGUYỄN GIANG BÃO NGỌC-19DH130388-ĐỌC TIẾNG ANH 3-04012022-9g00
Read the following passages and do the tasks that follow. 

Passage 1:

 AROUND THE WORLD IN 222 DAYS

 (5 ms) 

 

The history of modern tourism began on 5 July 1841, when a train carrying 500 factory workers travelled from 

Leicester to Loughborough, twenty miles away, to attend a meeting about the danger of alcohol. 

This  modest  excursion  was  organized  by  Thomas  Cook,  a  young  man  with  neither  money  nor  formal 

education.  His  motive  was  not  profit,  but  social  reform.    Cook  believed  that  the  social  problems  of  Britain 

were caused by widespread alcoholism. Travel, he believed, would broaden the mind and distract people from 

drinking.   

 

The success of Cook’s first excursion led to others, and the success of business was  phenomenal. In 1851, 



Cook launched his monthly newsletter, Cook’s Exhibition Herald and excursion Advertiser, the world’s first 

travel magazine; by 1872, the newsletter was selling 100,000 copies a month and its founder was treated as a 

hero of a modern industrial age. 

 

When Thomas Cook reached the age of sixty-three, there was one challenge ahead of him: to travel around the 



globe.  The  idea  of  travelling  ‘to  Egypt  via  China’  seemed  impossible  to  most  of  Victorians.  Cook  knew 

otherwise. In 1869 two things happened that would make an overland journey possible: the opening of Suez 

Canal and the completion of a railroad network that linked the continent of America from coast to coast. 

 

He  set  off  from  Liverpool  on  the  steamship  Oceanic,  bound  for  New  York.  Throughout  his  travels,  his 



traditional views affected most of what his saw, including the American railroad system. Although impressed 

by its open carriages, sleeping cars, on-board toilets and efficient baggage handling, he was shocked that men 

and women were not required to sleep in separate carriages. 

 

BM4A.QT01/KT 




 

Japan delighted him. It was a land of ‘great beauty and fertility’, where the hotel served ‘the best roast beef we 



have tasted since we left England’. Cook and his party toured the city od Yokohama in a caravan of rickshaws. 

‘We created quite a sensation’ he wrote.  

 

Cook’s love of Japan was equaled only by his hatred of China. Shanghai, the next port of call, offered ‘narrow 



and filthy streets’ which were full of ‘pestering  and festering beggars. After 24 hours there, Cook had seen 

enough. 


 

He travelled to Singapore and as his set off across the Bay of Bengal, Cook was full of confident, feeling that 

he understood ‘this business of pleasure’. But nothing he had seen in Shanghai could have prepared him for 

the culture shock of India. 

 

‘At the holy city of Benares, we were conducted through centers of filth and obscenity’, he wrote. From the 



deck  of  a  boat  on  a  Ganges  he  saw  the  people  washing  dead  bodies,  before  burning  them  on  funeral  piles 

beside the river. He found these scenes ‘revolting in the extreme’. 

 

By  the  time  Cook  left  Bombay  for  Egypt,  he  was  showing  sign  of  tiredness.  On  15  February  1873,  while 



crossing the Red Sea, he wrote to The Times that he would not travel around the world again. ‘After thirty-two 

years  of  travelling,  with  the  view  of  making  travelling  easy,  cheap  and  safe  for  others,  I  ought  to  rest.’  In 

Cairo, he fell seriously ill for the first time. 

 

Cook  arrived  home  in  England  after  222  days  abroad.  Although  he  never  tempted  another  world  tour,  he 



continued  to  escort  parties  of  tourists  to  continental  Europe  throughout  the  1870s,  and  did  not  cease  his 

seasonal visits to Egypt until the late 1880s. He died in July 1892 at the age of eighty-three. 




tải về 336.39 Kb.

Chia sẻ với bạn bè của bạn:
1   2   3   4   5   6




Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©hocday.com 2022
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương