Sample of organizations participating in consolidated appeals


Strategic Objectives for Humanitarian Action in 2011



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4.2 Strategic Objectives for Humanitarian Action in 2011


The strategic priorities have been agreed by the humanitarian community, in close consultation with the government authorities and humanitarian donors during the CAP workshop.17 They take into account current humanitarian needs as well as likely developments during 2011 based on the most likely scenario above. Therefore, they focus in particular on ensuring basic needs are met and mitigating potential cross-cutting problems like natural disasters or political unrest.
The strategy and key indicators determined by these priorities are further detailed in the cluster response plans in section 4.5.
Objective 1: To contribute to the creation of favourable conditions in the return areas, particularly in terms of community development, and to search for sustainable solutions to allow the reintegration of displaced people there.
Strategy: Support the voluntary return of IDPs in safety and dignity through the implementation of a multi-sector cluster approach.
Key Indicators

  • Number of IDPs who either returned to areas of origin or resettled/integrated in other communities.

  • Number of GBV and CP cases reported, documented and addressed in return areas.

  • Number returnees families and vulnerable host community families receiving food and non-food assistance.

  • Number of people immunized against vaccine preventable disease.

  • Number of these cases referred for HIV-related services (including PEP) in return areas.

  • Number of mother and baby pairs receiving counselling on prevention of malnutrition.

  • Number of vulnerable people accessing basic health services.

  • Number of vulnerable girls and boys enrolled in primary school and/or accessing learning spaces.

  • Number of vulnerable girls and boys (including adolescents) with access to life skills (including HIV).

  • Number of returnee households and vulnerable host community families receiving agricultural inputs.

  • Number of returnee families and vulnerable host community families with access to short term employment through CFW and FFW.  

  • Number of vulnerable adolescents with access to adolescent friendly sexual and reproductive services.

  • Number of IDPs and vulnerable host community individuals graduated from skill training programmes with a startup toolkit.


Objective 2: To continue responding to humanitarian needs in the affected areas and in the camps for vulnerable groups.
Strategy: provision of timely, coordinated and adequate basic services such as shelter, food aid, NFIs, potable water, health, nutrition, sanitation and education within a rights-based approach. Gender and other cross-cutting issues will be mainstreamed.
Key Indicators

  • Number of camps managed by aid organizations.

  • Number of protections issues (GBV and CP cases) reported, documented and addressed.

  • Percentage of those reporting with sexual violence referred for PEP within 72 hours.

  • Percentage of pregnant women living with HIV offered prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services.

  • Amount of water delivered per person.

  • Number of latrines installed and maintained.

  • Number of separated children registered and reunited with their families or primary caregivers.

  • Number of children under five treated for SAM.

  • Number of projects with gender marker.


Objective 3: To put in place disaster risk reduction methods and a contingency plan to reduce the impact of disasters.
Strategy: Assist the Direction de la Protection Civile (DPC) in developing a multi-risk contingency plan and preparedness response to natural disasters.
Key Indicators

  • Multi-risk contingency plan first draft developed by the end of February 2011.

  • Development of departmental contingency and response plans.

  • Improvement of epidemiological surveillance system.


Objective 4: To strengthen the capacity of public institutions and community structures to ensure access to basic social services, in particular in the directly and indirectly affected areas.
Strategy: Ensure programmes involving local authorities and enhance community participation.
Key Indicators

  • Support on camp management.

  • Improve data collection and analysis.

  • Increase leadership capacity among IDP and host leaders.


4.3 Gender Marker


In line with global Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) agreement, the gender marker has been introduced in the development of the 2011 CAP for the Haiti. The marker is a tool that codes, on a 0-2 scale, whether or not a humanitarian project is designed well enough to ensure that women/girls and men/boys will benefit equally from it or that it will advance gender equality in another way.
As the needs assessments have highlighted, the humanitarian situation in Haiti, itself a product of chronic poverty and vulnerability compounded by the impact of natural disasters and disease outbreaks, has an acute gender dimension. As a result, it was decided that each project in this 2011 CAP should take into account gender-specific needs as well as measures preventing or reducing the impact of GBV. The HCT also decided not to prioritize gender-blind projects (although some exceptions can be considered for support services to the humanitarian community, e.g. logistics, emergency telecommunications and coordination).
The use of the gender marker in this appeal reflects a strong commitment from the Resident Coordinator/Humanitarian Coordinator (RC/HC) and the humanitarian community at large to achieving greater gender equality and addressing GBV in Haiti. As the gender marker was rolled out with minimal support from headquarters, a Gender Standby Capacity Project (GenCap) specialist will be deployed to Haiti to support the clusters in their use of the gender marker to further improve gender mainstreaming in programming, monitoring and evaluation.


4.4 Strategic Monitoring Plan


The HCT, with the support of the inter-cluster coordination (cluster leads) developed and agreed on a common strategic monitoring plan for 2011. Quarterly cluster monitoring reports will be presented by cluster leads at the inter-cluster coordination. The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Information Management Unit will map gaps and achievements while the HCT will review strategic objects accordingly.
Expected outcomes

  • Proper follow up on projects’ progress to date towards fulfilling targets and meeting common objectives, while allowing space for a change of course, if necessary.

  • Improve accountability and transparency while allowing for ability to learn lessons.

  • Provide accurate information for planning purposes, advocacy and reporting.

  • Allow for an external and unbiased view of performance.

The following pages present the 2011 humanitarian strategy in logical framework format.



A. Logical framework

Strategic Objective

Key Indicators

Corresponding Sector Response Plan Objectives

1. To contribute to the creation of favourable conditions in the return areas, particularly in terms of community development, and to search for sustainable solutions to allow the reintegration of displaced people there.

  • Number of IDPs who either returned to areas of origin or resettled/integrated in other communities.

  • Number of GBV and CP cases reported, documented and addressed in return areas (including with referrals for HIV-related services).

  • Number of returnees families and vulnerable host community families receiving food aid.

  • Number of people immunized against vaccine preventable disease.

  • Number of mother and baby pairs receiving counselling on prevention of malnutrition.

  • Number of vulnerable people accessing basic health services.

  • Number of vulnerable girls and boys enrolled in primary school and/or accessing learning spaces.

  • Number of returnees households and vulnerable host community families receiving agricultural inputs.

  • Number of returnees families and vulnerable host community families with access to short-term employment.

  • Number of IDPs and vulnerable host community individuals graduated from skill training programmes with a startup toolkit.

Agriculture

Provide employment opportunities and strengthen income generation capacity of rural households directly and indirectly affected by the earthquake.

Strengthen capacity of vulnerable rural communities and national institutions to be prepared for, withstand and respond to shocks.



CCCM

To contribute at the creation of favourable conditions for voluntary return and access to other durable solutions.

To assure effective camp closure and (if possible) the consolidation of the camps for the residual caseloads.



Coordination

Comprehensive strategy to ensure smooth transition to longer-term recovery in support of national priorities.

ER

Support the adequate return/relocation and integration of IDP to their communities of origin.

Provision of basic services to most vulnerable groups, including IDPs and host families as well as families that cannot return to their places of origin.

Support to the socio-economic integration of vulnerable groups, both in urban and rural areas, through inclusive job creation and income generating activities.


Education

Ensure access to quality education of 425,000 children aged 4-14 years (pre-school and primary) in the geographical areas of: (i) return; (ii) relocation; and (iii) host communities.

Telecommunications

Provide an extended reliable very high frequency (VHF)/high frequency (HF) radio network independent from public infrastructure with coverage in PaP and department’s capitals to provide voice communications services for the safety and security of humanitarian workers in all areas of operation and complement the public infrastructure as it is being restored.

Food Assistance

Continue to respond to the immediate needs of poor and vulnerable food-insecure households.

Increase the resilience of vulnerable households to shocks and enhance their ability to preserve assets through risk mitigation measures.



Health

Maintaining access to basic health services for the population directly or indirectly affected including HIV prevention, care, support and treatment services.

Strengthen environmental health programmes, including water quality, and health promotion.

Strengthen Health Cluster coordination for effective service delivery and information sharing.


Logistics

Provide common logistics services to support the humanitarian community’s response.

Enhance coordination, predictability, timeliness and efficiency of the emergency logistics response under the cluster approach.



Nutrition

Contribute to the reduction of nutrition related morbidity and mortality in children under five, PLW and other vulnerable groups (HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis [TB] elderly); prevent acute malnutrition.

Protection

Identify security concerns with implications for human rights and protection, with particular attention to sexual gender-based violence (SGVB), CP, forced evictions and access to minimum services and support the response of relevant actors. CP: see separate Sub-Cluster Response Plan.

Ensure non-discrimination of vulnerable groups and attention to their specific needs in the delivery of protection and assistance, with particular focus on people with disabilities, the elderly, children, women at risk and people with chronic illnesses.

Promote respect for dignity and human rights in the process of return/reintegration, relocation and local integration.


CP

Preventing and responding to separated and unaccompanied children.

GBV

Preventing GBV through work with security and other sectors.

Ensuring women and girls survivors of GBV have access to essential services including HIV-related services.

Ensuring the coordination and the monitoring of GBV activities.


Shelter and NFIs

Provide transitional shelter as an interim solution to long-term shelter assistance.

WASH

Facilitate return and reintegration of displaced populations by improving access to minimum levels of safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene promotion in areas directly and indirectly affected by the 12 January 2010 earthquake (for example host communities or large towns inundated by displaced populations).

  1. To continue responding to humanitarian needs in the affected areas and in the camps for vulnerable groups.

  • Number of camps managed by aid organizations.

  • Number of protections issues (GBV and CP cases) reported, documented and addressed.

  • Amount of water delivered per person.

  • Number of latrines installed and maintained.

  • Number of separated children registered and reunited with their families or primary caregivers.

  • Number of children under five treated for SAM.

  • Number of projects with gender marker.

Agriculture

Support agricultural production capacities of vulnerable rural and urban households affected by the earthquake.

CCCM

To continue to assist IDPs in their primary needs in the affected zones and within camps, with particular attention to activities targeting prevention and referral of cholera cases.

Coordination

Effective coordination of humanitarian response.

Enhanced safety and security for UN and humanitarian personnel.



Education

Ensure access to quality education to 360,000 children living in camps.

Provide life-skills-based HIV education.



Telecommunications

Provide an extended reliable VHF/HF radio network independent from public infrastructure with coverage in PaP and department’s capitals to provide voice communications services for the safety and security of humanitarian workers in all areas of operation and complement the public infrastructure as it is being restored.

Food Assistance

Continue to respond to the immediate needs of poor and vulnerable food-insecure households.

Increase the resilience of vulnerable households to shocks and enhance their ability to preserve assets through risk mitigation measures.



Health

Maintaining access to basic health services for the population directly or indirectly affected including HIV/AIDS prevention, care, support and treatment.

Strengthen environmental health programmes, including water quality, and health promotion.

Strengthen Health Cluster coordination for effective service delivery and information sharing.


Logistics

Provide common logistics services to support the humanitarian community’s response.

Enhance coordination, predictability, timeliness and efficiency of the emergency logistics response under the cluster approach.



Nutrition

Contribute to the reduction of nutrition-related morbidity and mortality in children under five, PLW and other vulnerable groups (HIV/AIDS, TB, elderly). Prevent acute malnutrition.

Protection

Identify security concerns with implications for human rights and protection, with particular attention to SGBV, CP, forced evictions and access to minimum services and support the response of relevant actors. CP: see separate Sub-Cluster Response Plan.

Ensure non-discrimination of vulnerable groups and attention to their specific needs in the delivery of protection and assistance, with particular focus on people with disabilities, the elderly, children, women at risk and people with chronic illnesses.



CP

Preventing and responding to separated and unaccompanied children.

GBV

Preventing GBV through work with security and other sectors.

Ensuring women and girls survivors of GBV have access to essential services including HIV-related services.

Ensuring the coordination and the monitoring of GBV activities.


Shelter and NFIs

Provide tents/tarpaulins as emergency shelter assistance.

Provide transitional shelter as an interim solution to long-term shelter assistance.



WASH

Maintain a basic level of life-saving WASH assistance in the areas affected by the 12 January 2010 earthquake, notably camps of displaced people and neighbourhoods around camps of displaced people, with a focus on the most vulnerable groups including people living with HIV.

  1. To put in place DRR methods, and contingency plan to reduce the impact of disasters.




Multi-risk contingency plan 1st draft developed by the end of February 2011. Development of departmental contingency and response plans. Improvement of epidemiological surveillance system.


CCCM

To improve the resiliency of displaced and vulnerable populations through the development of disaster preparedness and contingency plans for camps and camp-like settlements.

Coordination

Coordinated disaster preparedness and response.

ER

Disaster preparedness and contingency planning, particularly in the return and relocation areas.

Education

Build capacities of 500 partners including government officials, NGOs, educational personnel and teachers, on DRR.

Telecommunications

Strengthen national disaster preparedness and effective response through establishment of a voice and data communication system for DPC of the GoH.

To enhance and expand the existing UN data network through providing natural disaster prone data and connectivity backup solutions.



Food Assistance

Strengthen emergency preparedness and response particularly in disaster prone areas through contingency planning and food prepositioning for timely response.

Health

Strengthen timely and appropriate response to disasters and public health emergencies, including contingency planning.

Reinforce surveillance systems in order to identify trends in disease occurrence and outbreak control.



Logistics

Support the humanitarian community and nationals authorities by providing support to contingency planning for the cyclonic season.

Nutrition

Strengthen national capacity for emergency preparedness and response.

WASH

Reinforce the capacity of WASH actors to prepare and react to disasters.




Strategic Objective

Key Indicators

Corresponding Sector Response Plan Objectives

  1. To strengthen the capacity of public institutions and community structures to ensure access to basic social services, in particular in the directly and indirectly affected areas.

Support on camp management.

Improve data collection and analysis.

Increase leadership capacity among IDP and host leaders.


Agriculture

Strengthen capacities of national authorities and local communities to provide essential services to rural population and monitor food security situation.

CCCM

To reinforce the capacity of public institutions and local and international humanitarian actors to assure the adequate management of the displaced population, increase awareness of DRR and support to establish cholera and HIV prevention and response mechanism.

Coordination

Strategic information management and analysis to enhance decision- making and inform strategic planning.

ER

Capacity development and reinforcement of local communities as well as national authorities to enhance coordination and ownership of the ER process.

Education

Build capacities of the education authorities at national, local and school level on planning, coordination, data collection and management.

Food Assistance

Support in building government, local and community-based capacities in food security programmes, disaster preparedness and response.

Logistics

Support the humanitarian community and the Government counterpart to carry out their role by providing operational support equipment and facilities.

Nutrition

Strengthen national capacity for emergency preparedness and response.

Protection

Support the Haitian government in meeting its human rights/protection obligations on issues such as evictions, documentation.

Strengthen the capacity of communities and civil society organizations to respond to protection challenges both in PaP and the regions.

Mainstream human rights and protection in all areas of intervention.


CP

Strengthening Government, civil society and local authorities’ skills and capacity to respond to CP needs.

Promoting community-based mechanisms that provide psycho-social support and protect children from risks of increased exposure to violence, trafficking, abuse, neglect and exploitation which put them at increased risk of HIV.



WASH

Reinforce the capacity of national WASH authorities at different levels to manage, coordinate and respond to needs in affected areas.

4.5 Criteria for Selection and Prioritization of Projects


Criteria for selection

The criteria for selecting projects to be included in the 2011 CAP were developed by the humanitarian community in close consultation with the government authorities and humanitarian donors during the CAP workshop.18



  • The project must be consistent with the cluster strategy, and must contribute towards the achievement of one or several of the strategic objectives agreed upon by the HCT for the humanitarian operation in 2011.

  • The project must present a target in specified operational areas and should not duplicate activities implemented by other organizations.

  • The implementing agency must have an existing capacity to implement the project.

  • The appealing organization must be fully participating cluster member which shares full reports on implementation and funding the cluster.

  • The project must be more likely to receive funding from humanitarian donors than from reconstruction donors.

  • The appealing agency must demonstrate that it cannot fund the project from existing resources (private donations).

  • The implementation of the project or most of it must be feasible within the 12-month timeframe (2011).

  • The project must demonstrate that it is based on sound assessment of needs and must target the most vulnerable beneficiaries.

  • The project should be the result of consultation with local communities, government officials and/or UN/NGO partners.

  • The project should take into account gender-specific needs and measures preventing or reducing the impact of GBV.

  • The project must be cost-effective with respect to the number of beneficiaries and the needs to which the project intends to respond.

  • The project aims enabling beneficiaries including vulnerable people such as children, women, and displaced people to exercise their fundamental human rights that are embedded in international and national tools.


Prioritization of projects




Priority level

Projects targeting the creation of favourable host conditions in the return areas and search for sustainable solutions to allow the reintegration of affected populations should be considered high priority.



Projects responding to humanitarian needs in the affected areas and in the camps for vulnerable groups should be considered high priority.






Projects supporting DRR and contingency planning should be considered medium priority.





Projects strengthening the capacity of public institutions and community structures to ensure access to basic social services should be considered medium priority.





Gender-blind projects should not be prioritized (exceptions can be considered for support services to humanitarian community, e.g. logistics, emergency telecommunications and coordination).


4.6 Cluster Response Plans

Agriculture


Cluster Lead

FAO

Implementing Agencies

APERE, ACD, AA, AAI, ACPIAPDAM, ACF, ADRA, ACDI, ACTED, AECID, ACDI/VOCA, AAA, AVSF, AJOOLI, AMECON 2000, ADF, AMURT, ARCH, APFB, APROS/S, ASMARPENIPPES, AEPCGH, APVERTE, ANA, AGPAM APAN, ASSODLO, AHFH, AKPBKP, AKB, BEYOND BORDERS, BRAC HAITI, BRAC USA, BRDFP, CEHPAPE, CA, CC, CORDAID, CH, CRS, CBPOT, CECI, CURSAH, CIAT, CEVAD, CAF , CESVI, CFTA/FDEH, CVM/ACV, CMSR, CHP, CRDFP, CDAC, CODEP, CWW, CHF, CTA/GTZ, CAPAS, COPEDECS, CAR, CNSA, COSPECS, CRDFP, DFID, DK, DE, EI, EFS, EV, FO, FORHAD, FLM, FIDA, FILS, FINCA, FISEH, FLORESTA, FADA, FGBM, FONHFARA, FOSA, FROCSAH, FRADES, FONJJAD, FAO, FG, FH, FOCS, FND, FHED INC, GDECC, GHA, GRET, GREPS, GJARE, GROPADEP, GVC, HE, HI, HRC, HV, HAS, HI, HelpAge International, HFP, HWA, HAS, HPI/HAITI, HAO, IAT/HRC, ICCO/KIS, IEDA/RELIEF, IFAD, IFCR, ISG, INDY, ID, ID/IDEMA, UHDI, IICA, IAT, IOM, IOCC, IRD, JJDF, JUHG, LWF, MMSN, MKF, MHO, Mercy Corps, MARNDR, MINUSTAH, MEBSH, MOJEPSMPP, NHN, NG, NVHP, ODECC, OCHA/IASC, OMKL, OPADD, OCRDN, OPADI, OGITH, OHDD, OMPDV, ONJDR, ORE, ORELPH, ORH, OSIC, OXFAM, OXFAM GB, OXFAM QUEBEC, PADI, PADFPCI, PDL, PRORAPES, PLOPP, PLOPPINAPADH, PRODEV, PADIH, PROGRESSI , PROTOS, RANCOD, RDPC, RI, SP, SC, SGM, SMTN, SI, SMI, TEARFUND, SA, TSA, TS, UCODEP, UMCOR, UNDAC, UNDP, UNFAP/OCHA, UJDHRD, UHD, UNEP, USAID, USAID/DART, UP, US ARMY, VSF, VETERMON, VIVA RIO, VA, WINNER/USAID, WCC, WFP, WV, UNASCCAD, NCV, CDN, FJECS, OJPDO

Number of Projects

22

Cluster/sector Objectives

The overall objective of the Agricultural Cluster in Haiti is to continue to reduce the food insecurity induced by the January 12 earthquake with special focus on the vulnerable groups.

This will be achieved by attaining the following specific objectives:



  • Support agricultural production capacities of vulnerable rural and urban households affected by the earthquake.

  • Provide employment opportunities and strengthen income generation capacity of rural households directly and indirectly affected by the earthquake.

  • Strengthen capacity of vulnerable rural communities and national institutions to be prepared for, withstand and respond to shocks.

  • Strengthen capacities of national authorities and local communities to provide essential services to rural population and monitor food security situation.

Beneficiaries

480,000 vulnerable households in earthquake directly and indirectly affected areas. Activities will target in priority: displaced population and host communities in rural areas; displaced population in urban and peri-urban areas, women headed households, food-insecure and malnourished households, HIV-affected households, chronically ill and handicapped members.

Funds Requested

$43,087,517

Funds requested

Agreed at CAP meetings not to have priority levels.

Contact Information

Francesco Delre: Francesco.Delre@fao.org




Table of beneficiaries per department

Beneficiaries (households)

Category

Female

Male

Total

IDPs and resettling households

65,000

35,000

100,000

Female-headed and other vulnerable households

168,000

102,000

270,000

Households affected by natural disasters

55,000

55,000

110,000

Total

288,000

192,000

480,000


Needs Analysis

The earthquake had and continues to have a significant impact on food security, both in the directly affected areas and the non-directly affected areas of the country. Asset loss, migration, economic impacts, and the period of increased food prices (January to March) all eroded household coping strategies and livelihoods; households have been left more food-insecure and less resilient to future shocks. In the directly affected areas, households suffered considerable asset loss as a result of the earthquake. Between February and June 2010, households recovered very few assets, indicating that their current situation is not allowing them to rebuild lives and livelihoods.


At national level an extensive input support programme contributed to maintain reasonable production levels.
In the season immediately after the earthquake farmers overall sowed less seed than normal, and a drop of 15.9% across crops and regions was observed. This reduction was largely due to financial constraints.
In general, a sharp decline in the output of pulses was observed and to a lesser extent in the output of the maize, sorghum and plantain crops. Root crop production has remained similar to previous years. The aggregate 2010 crop production is forecast at about 503,600 MTs of cereals, 148,000 MTs of pulses, 1,232,900 MTs of root crops and 313,200 MTs of plantain representing a reduction of 9%, 20%, 12% and 14% in cereals, pulses, root crops and plantain, respectively. However, the areas in/near the directly affected zone (Léogâne, Nippes and south-east departments) have suffered from poor harvests (mainly beans) as well as the impact of reduced sale of their harvest in the months following to the quake. Some areas in the south-East have also lost part of the corn crop due to heavy winds. The north, north east, and Centre departments also have areas that suffered poor harvests. Even though relief operations have contributed to increase use of fertilizer access to the latter and improved agricultural inputs continues to be poor, which is a barrier to increased production. Households have resumed economic activities to a large part since February, but have not reached the same levels as pre-quake. Although there are fewer households currently hosting displaced people, there continue to be many households hosting displaced people in and outside of the directly affected areas. The displaced themselves continue to be more vulnerable as they are usually relying on their host families.
Chronic food insecurity continues to be an issue throughout the country, and is often linked to structural problems, lack of economic opportunities, and general poverty. Food insecurity continues to be at higher levels than before the earthquake in the directly affected areas, and only slightly decreased since February. Moreover a substantial proportion of the households continue to rely on unsustainable coping strategies, although the prevalence and frequency has dropped since February.
Objectives

The overall objective of the Agricultural Cluster in Haiti is to continue to ensure the reduction of food insecurity induced by the earthquake. Specific objectives include:



  • support agricultural production capacities of vulnerable rural and urban households affected by the earthquake.

  • provide employment opportunities and strengthen income generation capacity of rural households directly and indirectly affected by the earthquake.

  • strengthen capacity of vulnerable rural communities and national institutions to be prepared for, withstand and respond to shocks.

  • strengthen capacities of national authorities and local communities to provide essential services to rural population and monitor food security situation.

The main outputs of the interventions in the agricultural sector will be:



  • 160,000 rural families affected by the earthquake will have a facilitated access to agricultural inputs.

  • vegetables produced and income generated through home/urban gardens for 55,000 urban households.

  • 60,000 will have increased purchasing power and have access to additional income through promotion of income generating activities in urban and peri-urban areas.

  • over 210,000 temporary employments generated in rural areas with the double effect of: (i) increase purchasing power of rural households (displaced and hosts); (ii) rehabilitate and improve rural infrastructure.

  • exposure to risk of floods and hurricanes will be reduced through extraordinary maintenance and repair of key infrastructures (water discharges, channels, drainages, rural feeder roads, gullies and ravines).

  • decentralized structure of the MARNDR and DPA, farmer associations and community-based organizations will be strengthened enhancing their capacity to provide basic services be more prepared to manage risk in rural areas

High quality inputs will be made available to vulnerable farmers through a mixture of measure (seed fairs, vouchers programmes, subsidized distributions and direct distributions). Whenever possible local procurement of inputs will be preferred to strengthen local market recovery, allow for the genetic preservation of local varieties and stimulate producers to engage in higher value production activities. Procurement of seeds outside Haiti will be in line with guidelines prepared by the MARNDR. Use of improved varieties will ensure increased yields and increased food production per unit of land, thereby alleviating part of the pressure created by the displacement of population to the rural areas.


The main impact of these interventions will be improved food availability resulting from increased agricultural production by poor, vulnerable rural households and urban families that lost their income sources and newly vulnerable earthquake-affected people who will have generated their own food and income. Increased food production will reduce the risk of long-term food aid dependency and will contribute to lower food prices in local markets, thus improving access to food for low income households. In addition, urban households whose livelihoods have been seriously disrupted by the earthquake will have improved access to nutritious vegetables produced by urban gardening initiatives that will provide micronutrient rich fresh vegetables and sources of income. The distribution of agricultural input packages will also facilitate return, reintegration and resettlement in rural areas of households displaced by the earthquake.
Provision of employment opportunities in the rural areas through CFW and promotion of income generating activities, will help prevent asset stripping (animals, tools, land) and reduce the burden of displaced population on host households in rural areas thus facilitating reintegration and resettlement of displaced populations. The additional income generated by these interventions will also contribute to ease the pressure on natural resources and reduce the use of disruptive and unsustainable coping strategies by the most vulnerable sections of the population. These activities will particularly focus on women and the creation of self-help groups.
Specific actions are anticipated to strengthen resilience of local communities enabling them to withstand and respond to the impact of natural disasters (floods and hurricanes in particular) in areas of the country regularly exposed to extreme events. The risk reduction measures will be implemented through labour intensive activities and will have multiplier effect by which jobs are created and income raised in the rural areas. Farmer and communal associations will be strengthened and support will be given to the Departmental Direction of Agriculture and the Departmental committees for Disaster Risk Management to enhance capacity in emergency preparedness and response. A strategic stock of agricultural inputs will be prepositioned in key locations around the country. Thus ensure that national bodies supported by the cluster will have a minimal response capacity in occurrence of a disaster.
Project implementation will be undertaken mainly by Cluster member organizations. However, there will be inter-cluster collaboration and common areas of work have been identified. Joint programming, close collaboration and complementary activities are envisaged with regard to Nutrition, Food Aid, Shelter and ER Clusters.


Specific Objective

Outcome

Outputs

Indicators

Specific Objective 1: Support agricultural production capacities of vulnerable rural and urban households affected by the earthquake.

Outcome 1.1: Improved food availability for vulnerable households in rural affected areas.

1.1.1 160,000 households are able to cultivate at least 0.5 ha

The number of hectares cultivated and production obtained

Outcome 1.2: Displaced households in urban and peri-urban affected areas have improved income and access to food.

1.2.1 55,000 households able to generate income from urban agriculture production.

The income of households has increased by 10%.
Increased food consumption.

Specific Objective 2: Provide employment opportunities and strengthen income generation capacity of rural households directly and indirectly affected by the earthquake.

Outcome 2.1:

Improved income and purchasing power of vulnerable household, in particular IDPs , thus facilitating reintegration and resettlement.



2.1.1 210,000 temporary employment created.

2.1.2 Establishment of 250 self-help groups.



Number of working days/ person.
Income earned/ person.
Number women participating actively in the groups.

Specific Objective 3: Strengthen capacity of vulnerable rural communities and national institutions to be prepared for, withstand and respond to shocks.

Outcome 3.1: Centralized and decentralized structures of MARNDR and DPC are able to respond to a disaster affecting the agricultural sector.

3.1.1 Contingency stock of essential agricultural inputs is established and reaching 110,000 rural households.

3.1.2 A contingency plan for the agricultural sector is available.



The number of households receiving assistance

response measures are implemented according to the plan.




Outcome 3.3: Exposure to risk reduced and disaster mitigation measures in place in selected watersheds.
Outcome 3.4: Increased resilience of targeted communities.

3.3.1 1,000 hectare of land protected.

3.4.1 1,000 farmers are able to control erosion and manage better their farms.



Number of hectares effectively managed and protected.

Specific Objective 4: Support in building government, local and community –based capacities in food security, disaster preparedness and response at all levels.

Outcome 4.1: Capacity of MARNDR is strengthened ensuring an efficient use of the resources deployed.

Outcome 4.2: Early warning systems, contingency plans and food security monitoring systems in place.

4.1.1 National institution able to detect, prepared for and respond to natural disasters.
All actors involved in a coordination mechanism able to respond to a possible disaster.

The number of people trained and able to put in practice what they learned.
Timeliness and volume of response.


Indicators

A series of process and outcome indicators will provide necessary qualitative and quantitative data that will feed the monitoring system in place and allow project managers to take corrective measures should projects need adjustments.


Sectoral monitoring plan

The sectoral monitoring plan is based on three main principles:



  1. Comparative advantage of the different organizations with regard to technical expertise.

  2. The capacity, geographical reach and technical area of cluster partners based on the 3W mapping and related assessment of cluster actors.

  3. The process and outcome indicators described earlier.

The sectoral monitoring plan will be an evolving plan that will gather data at field level of the different actor’s performance, the achievements and the results obtained in relation to the objectives and the expected impacts.


Project monitoring will be two pronged: (i) of individual organizations with regard to project donors, and (ii) from the cluster coordination unit with regard to the GoH, the UNHC and the United Nations Country Team (UNCT) in general.
The results from the monitoring will influence project managers and will be fed at two main stages of the project life: at mid-term (from 4-6 months after project inception and taking into account harvest time for crop indicators) and at project’s end.
In order to have an effective monitoring system in place, the Cluster Coordinator will undertake regional meetings with the focal organizations for each of the ten departments. In the monitoring process, the organizations will sent their reports to the donors and to the Cluster Coordination Unit who will provide guidance to the different organizations in term of the necessary data to report to the UN and the GoH.
The Cluster Coordinator will liaise with other clusters, mainly ER, Nutrition, Food Aid, and Shelter to ensure that the indicators and monitoring system in place provides useful information for coordination and comprehensive livelihoods’ restoration at national level.
The proposed areas that will be covered by this assessment are based on both the assessed needs and gaps in existing support on the one hand, and the capacity of Agriculture Cluster partners to deliver and monitor projects and activities. The responsibility of projects performance monitoring will be shared among the different cluster partners. Each organization will be required to establish a partnership with one or more local NGOs active in the project area in order to ensure improved understanding of local situations and heightened impacts and strengthened project outcomes. These partnerships will also contribute directly to increased transparency and accountability to the monitoring process.
Table of proposed coverage per site

SITE / AREA

ORGANIZATIONS

South East

AVSF, Veterimed, CROSE, ACDI VOCA, SI, FAO

South

WC

North West

WC, AAA, CARE

Nord

Floresta

North East

FAO, VSF

West

FAO

Artibonite

CARE

Grand Anse

PADI,

La Gonave

Concern Worldwide

Nippes

OXFAM


Camp Coordination and Camp Management


Cluster Lead

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MIGRATION (IOM)

Cluster Members

DPC, OXFAM, IOM, IEDA, WV, PU, CRF, CONCERN, ACTED, SASH, MSF, Solidarité, Mercy Corps, OXFAM Quebec, CARITAS, Croix Rouge Espagnole, SC, CRS, CARE, ARC, OXFAM GB, ACF, GOAL, IINTERSOS, ACT ALLIANCE, United Sikhs, CRH, Project Concern International, HAVEN, AVSI, AVAP, Mouvement Revolucionaire pour le development de Mariani, CEPED, OJEPOREB, Croix Rouge Autrichienne, Tzu Chi Foundation Taiwan, Croix Rouge Canadienne, Mairie Tabarre (DINEPA), AJDMP, OCDT, AJDSH, OREJAT, CESVI, AVOVIS 12, Cruz Roja Mexicana, CGVCHR, AJEEAC, Life Church, CUZPC, Merlin, DDD, MSF Belgium, DINEPA, OFADF, AJEUDEL, OPADEM, Entraide, AFPD, FANMSA, PESADEV, FLM, Rescue, FOHED, CGCHTN, AMI Jesus, World Harves Mission, GRADIN, Les Deplaces et les Salesiens, GTIH UNDP, Lions Club International Foundation, GTZ, AdS, CGB, Helping Hand U.S.A, ASCJM, IEDA, Hope Worldwide Haiti, OPUP, AMURTEL, ODEFH, IEDA Relief, OJDB, INPHPACTS, OJMDP, ACDR, ORAPSCAR, CGC, OSDEN, IRC, Assosiation des Jeunes de Charles Oscar, IRD, Comite Central, SP PLAN, ACREPB, RAPDHA, ADRA, AJAG, Tet Ansam anba Bannann, IR, SIR JPHRO, Solidarités, KDS2, The Frontiers, Koalityon Preto Kari B, UNITECHD, UNOPS, Komite Legliz La, UPROCOM, Komite pou Gesyon Sant Ebejeman Bato, Viva Rio, Komite ya pa la pout a bay enfo say o, CCGCHB, Kros, KTAB, and many other key humanitarian actors involved in CCCM activities even though not acting as CMAs.

Number of Projects

22

Cluster Objectives

  • To contribute to the creation of favourable conditions for voluntary return and access to other durable solutions.

  • To assure effective camp closure and (if possible) the consolidation of camps for the residual caseloads.

  • To continue to assist IDPs in their primary needs in the affected zones and within camps, with particular attention to activities targeting prevention and referral of cholera cases.

  • To improve the resiliency of displaced and vulnerable populations through the development of disaster preparedness and contingency plans for camps and camp-like settlements.

  • To reinforce the capacity of public institutions and local and international humanitarian actors to assure the adequate management of the displaced population, increase awareness of DRR and support to establish cholera prevention and response mechanism.

Beneficiaries

1,300,000 IDPs

Funds Requested

$92,960,791

Contact Information

Giovanni Cassani, CCCM Cluster Coordinator (gcassani@iom.int)


Needs analysis

Nine months after the earthquake and despite the huge efforts made by the humanitarian community, about 1,300,000 IDPs are still living in around 1,300 scattered camps and sites in the capital, PaP, and the southern regions of Jacmel, Léogâne, Gressier, Petit Goâve and Grand Goâve. Such a displacement situation (the sheer scale of the situation, as well as the severe damage to infrastructure as a result of the earthquake) makes humanitarian response for affected populations extremely important. Furthermore, Haiti’s vulnerability to natural disasters is higher post-earthquake than before, which serves to further necessitate a strong humanitarian response. Finally, the late-October outbreak of cholera in Haiti — in and of itself a very serious problem — has been exacerbated by the effects of natural disasters (Hurricane Tomas) and shows the need for effective and comprehensive humanitarian action at the camp level.


The highest number of IDPs is concentrated in the commune of Delmas, followed by the communes of PaP and Carrefour in the urban and peri-urban areas of the capital. In Delmas alone there are 272 camps with a total population of 359,111 individuals. The majority of IDPs are displaced within the same commune where they lived before the earthquake. The southern regions – with the exception of Jacmel – have the highest percentage of IDPs remaining within their communes of origin, with more than 96% of the registered population. In the capital, only the communes of Tabarre and PaP have less than 80% of the IDPs currently residing in sites within the same section communal of their place of origin.

In terms of house and land tenure, 64% of the IDPs in the region of PaP reported being tenants (either of the land or the house). A further 19% of the IDPs indicated that they are owners and can repair their houses, and 11% stated to be owner but without the capacity to repair their houses. The highest percentages of tenants are reported in the communes of Delmas (71%) and Tabarre (68%). The commune with the lowest number of tenants is Petionville, with about 56%. When asked about their most urgent needs, IDPs identified access to food (18%) and cash for work opportunities (18%) as their main priorities, followed by access to shelter materials (14%), drinking water (8%), and relocation (7%). As a result of these outstanding needs — some of which are directly related to displacement in camps and others related to the link between camps and communities — CCCM anticipates the need to intervene both at the camp level and to increase support to community-based services as the return strategy gains momentum.
Currently, IDPs are receiving assistance from CMOs covering the seven communes in PaP and the regions of Jacmel, Léogâne, Gressier, Petit Goâve and Grand Goâve. Additionally, up to 53% of the total IDP households are receiving direct assistance from dedicated CMAs, the Haitian DPC and the Cluster lead Agency. Close to 96% of the camps have local Camp Committees composed of members of the IDP population. However, since displacement is expected to continue well into 2011, as well as likelihood of a continuing need for cholera-related interventions in IDP sites, it is very likely that the need for effective and comprehensive camp management support in sites will remain.
Haiti—even before the January 12 earthquake—was extremely vulnerable to natural disasters due to socio-economic conditions, a lack of environmental and watershed management, deforestation, etc. However, the earthquake (and its resultant displacement) and now cholera have increased the vulnerability to and exacerbated the potential effects of natural disasters. Hurricane Tomas and the storm of 24 September 2010 show the potentially catastrophic effects of natural disasters on IDP sites, including, importantly, the increased risk of cholera in the aftermath of a natural disaster. Mitigation works, risk mapping, sensibilization and capacity-building of disaster management authorities at the local level remain essential.
According to the CCCM Training Unit, as of 15 October, 2010, a total of 1,664 individuals have received training in camp management topics (e.g. coordination, protection, site planning and standards, psycho social aspects in camps, and registration). However, there remains a need to continue training Government and CCCM partners (both new and continuing) to ensure a high level of service in the camps and that cholera prevention and treatment are incorporated into CCCM activities in line with Government and international strategies.
I
© Daniel Desmarais 2010
n addition to training of Government and other CCCM actors regarding cholera, there will be a need to scale up dramatically, communication, health and WASH activities in camps to prevent the spread of the disease and refer possible cases to appropriate institution for treatment as soon as possible.

Objectives

The key priorities of the CCCM Cluster for 2011 will be to progressively find durable solutions for IDPs to leave the camps and close the cycle of displacement; and to guarantee a minimum amount of services, protection and assistance before, during and after the transition to the solutions, with particular attention to activities targeting prevention and referral of cholera cases.



In particular, and under the general objectives of the CAP, the CCCM Cluster will work:

  • to contribute to the creation of favourable conditions for voluntary return and access to other durable solutions.

  • to assure effective camp closure and (if possible) the consolidation of camps for the residual caseloads.

  • to continue to assist IDPs in their primary needs in the affected zones and within camps, with particular attention to activities targeting prevention and referral of cholera cases.

  • to improve the resiliency of displaced and vulnerable populations through the development of disaster preparedness and contingency plans for camps and camp-like settlements.

  • to reinforce the capacity of public institutions and local and international humanitarian actors to assure the adequate management of the displaced population, increase awareness of DRR and support to establish cholera prevention and response mechanism.


Activities

In order to support voluntary return/access to other durable solutions and effective camp closure (Objectives 1 and 2), the Cluster’s activities will include – first and foremost – the action of identifying beneficiaries living in camps and link them (if needed, case by case) with the actors providing durable solutions (such as shelter, house repairs etc.) and livelihood activities for the reintegration through: community or return coordination, (de)registration, two-way information gathering, surveys and information campaigns. Additionally, it was identified the need to provide legal support/documentation; cash assistance; and site planning/preparation. Finally, CCCM Cluster members stressed the need to provide (if needed) transport to IDPs willing to return; prevention to backfilling of the camps and decommissioning of the sites in order to return the land to the owners, as much as possible, close to the original conditions before the earthquake.
In order to assist the displaced in their primary needs (Objective 3), the Cluster’s activities will include actual camp management; protection activities (including lighting); care and maintenance of structures and facilities within sites, distribution or replacement of NFI; continuation of CCCM and CCCM-related trainings, support to cholera prevention and response-related activities.
To contribute to disaster preparedness and contingency plan activities (Objective 4), the Cluster will continue to make efforts in terms of mitigation works, promote awareness and direct support to the displaced in advance of the next hurricane season; and increase fire safety (via trainings and drills) and targeted information campaigns.

To reinforce the capacity of public institutions and humanitarian actors to assure the adequate management of the displaced population, increase awareness of DRR (Objective 5) and the prevention and response to cholera, the CCCM Cluster will continue to provide and promote trainings on CCCM, DRR-related matters and support the establishment of all necessary cholera prevention and response mechanism. It will also support the DPC in taking over more CCCM responsibilities providing targeted capacity-building support (including assets, supplies and training) and will foster increased capacity within the GoH and humanitarian actors in order to promote communication, information sharing, and dialogue.
Monitoring

Objectives

Indicators

Means of verification

To contribute at the creation of favourable conditions for voluntary return and access to other durable solutions.

Number of IDP households returned to their places of origin against the number of solutions made available to IDPs living in camps.

(De)Registration, assessments/displacement tracking matrix database.

Camp/return areas surveys.



To assure effective camp closure and (if possible) the consolidation of the camps for the residual caseloads.

Percentage of vacated camps decommissioned and returned to original owners.

Displacement tracking matri database.

To continue to assist IDPs in their primary needs in the affected zones and within camps, with particular attention to activities targeting prevention and referral of cholera cases.

Percentage of camps covered by monthly assessments.


Displacement tracking matri database.

To improve the resiliency of displaced and vulnerable populations through the development of disaster preparedness and contingency plans for camps and camp-like settlements.

Percentage of camps identified as at risk of flooding assessed by mitigation teams.

Percentage of the camps population reached by fire safety communication/training.



Site planning actors report/mitigation task force.

To reinforce the capacity of public institutions and local and international humanitarian actors to assure the adequate management of the displaced population, increase awareness of DRR and support to establish cholera prevention and response mechanism.

Number of humanitarian actors trained in DRR, cholera prevention, referral and CCCM (related) activities.

CCCM Cluster reports/database.


CMA coverage for all sites

Commune

CMA Presence

Households under CMA coverage

IDP sites under CMA coverage (%)

Households under CMA coverage (%)

Carrefour

41

18,355

27.70

45.76

Cité Soleil

26

12,115

54.17

80.79

Croix des Bouquets

21

8,897

19.27

41.52

Delmas

84

47,557

30.88

57.79

Ganthier

3

800

42.86

56.22

Petion Ville

32

9,442

31.07

41.74

Port Au Prince

56

42,020

31.64

62.65

Tabarre

24

8,467

28.24

53.86

Gressier

16

3,593

32.00

42.86

Léogâne

31

9,448

16.76

36.55

Grand Goâve

9

1,412

17.31

24.26

Petit Goâve

41

6,645

46.07

58.02

Jacmel

11

2,103

35.48

52.02

Grand Total

395

170,854

29.13

53.19%


For sites over 1,000 Households

Commune

CMA presence Sites >= 1,000 households

Households managed by CMA at sites >= 1,000 households

Sites >= 1000 households with CMA presence (%)

Households managed by CMA (% of sites >=1,000 households)

Carrefour

4

7,576

80.00%

77.50%

Cité Soleil

5

7,427

100.00%

100.00%

Croix des Bouquets

2

3'500

100.00%

100.00%

Delmas

10

28,489

66.67%

76.94%

Ganthier

-

-







Petion Ville

1

1,500

25.00%

24.33%

Port Au Prince

6

25,068

75.00%

91.60%

Tabarre

4

4,982

100.00%

100.00%

Gressier

1

1,266

100.00%

100.00%

Léogâne

-

-







Grand Goâve

-

-







Petit Goâve

-

-







Jacmel

1

1,013

100.00%

100.00%

Grand Total

34

80,821

75.56%

82.03%

(See http://groups.google.com/group/cccmhaiti
for details on which CCCM organizations are covering which sites.)





Coordination and Support Services


Lead Agency

Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)

Implementing Agencies

UNDP, UNDSS, UNICEF, UNOOSA, WFP

Number of Projects

3

Objectives

  • Effective coordination of humanitarian response.

  • Coordinated disaster preparedness and response.

  • Comprehensive strategy to ensure smooth transition to longer-term recovery in support of national priorities.

  • Strategic information management and analysis to enhance decision- making and inform strategic planning.

  • Enhanced safety and security for UN and humanitarian personnel.

Beneficiaries

Humanitarian community and government partners in Haiti

Funds Requested

$10,235,233

Contact Information

Esteban Sacco: saccoe@un.org


Response to date

Even as great strides were made following the January 2010 earthquake, the requirement for strong coordination is expected to continue in 2011. More than 1.3 million people remain displaced, spread across 1,300 settlement sites. The number of humanitarian actors has fluctuated greatly since the earthquake, but still hundreds remain. Numerous humanitarian organizations continue to operate outside of formal coordination structures.


The HCT continues to provide strategic direction to the humanitarian community in areas of response and disaster preparedness while OCHA continues to support the aid community through provision of dedicated support to inter-cluster coordination, information management and analysis, mapping, civil-military coordination, advocacy and media outreach.
Needs Analysis

Leadership of clusters remains uneven, and although national bodies are increasingly involved, they are not expected to assume consistent responsibilities in the near future. During 2011, each cluster will explore how best to adapt its work to eventually fold into Government-led sector working groups. Humanitarian actors are now focusing on disaster risk and preparedness at the national and departmental level.


MINUSTAH will continue to provide valuable services through its large network of resources. A substantial reduction in funding for humanitarian action has not yet been offset by a sufficient increase in funding for transition and development activities.
In 2011, OCHA will further strengthen the coordination system through support to the DSRSG/HC. OCHA will help put in place a more formalized HCT designed in accordance with a revised ToR to ensure more strategic decision-making. The forum will be informed by a prioritized set of issues generated by the Government, clusters, and affected communities, and captured through improved communication with OCHA’s field presence.
OCHA will continue to manage the CAP and Emergency Relief Response Fund (ERRF) and will seek to improve the evidence base for prioritizing humanitarian action. It will set clear criteria for project selection and work with partners on better coordinated needs assessments. While the size of the 2011 ERRF is expected to be much smaller than during the height of the earthquake crisis, OCHA will improve monitoring systems and use the fund to reach out to more national organizations.
OCHA will coordinate international preparedness planning in collaboration with the Government and international and national partners. Contingency planning will be expanded beyond hurricane scenarios. New plans will focus on a multi-hazard approach with clearly defined roles and responsibilities for the Government, humanitarian actors and MINUSTAH, while adequately linking humanitarian action to transition and development programmes. OCHA will also provide technical support through the DSRSG/HC to ensure humanitarian issues and principles are reflected in MINUSTAH’s planning and monitoring.

Information management products will support decision-making and provide a basis for improved analysis, prioritizing humanitarian response based on needs and creating benchmarks across clusters through inter-cluster coordination. OCHA will ensure its services are prioritized and that basic standards are provided with an eye toward minimum dependency and maximum transition.


Objectives

  • Inclusive humanitarian coordination mechanism is maintained and further strengthened.

  • Clear humanitarian leadership in support of national priorities.

  • Cluster system (including inter-cluster coordination) is strengthened and response capacity enhanced for ongoing and future disaster response.

  • Increase support to preparedness for the hurricane season.

  • Information products developed, maintained and disseminated.

  • Needs and concerns of affected populations highlighted and advocated.

  • GoH’s capacity is strengthened in preparing for the potential natural disasters.

  • Humanitarian support is based on accurate up-to-date data and responds better to real needs.

  • Key advocacy messages to humanitarian actors, government counterparts and the civil society and the global media coverage ensures support to the common humanitarian project cycle, a good outreach to humanitarian donors and the mobilization of the necessary resources.

  • Strengthened relationships with MINUSTAH, enabling effective cooperation between military and humanitarian actors.

  • Balanced coverage of the assessed humanitarian needs through accurate and transparent resource management, and the targeted and needs-based allocation of funds to priority and under-funded activities.

  • Cross-cutting issues (age, gender, HIV/AIDS, environment, human rights, diversity and DRR) are effectively mainstreamed into all aspects of humanitarian response.

  • Ensure a smooth transition from humanitarian assistance to recovery and national capacities to oversee the transition strengthened.



Early Recovery


Cluster/sector Lead Agency

UNDP

Implementing Agencies

ACF, ACTED, All Hands volunteers, American Refugee Com, APMADEN, AREJEHAVICCS, ILO, BRC, Concern Worldwide, Christian Aid, Caritas Austria, CHF International, CRS, DWHH, ECHO, EPER Lausanne/HEKS, EdM AO, HH, HI, Haven, HelpAge International, IOM, Mercy Corps, DPC, FRC, MARNDR, MPCE – GoH, OCHA, ODESD, UN HABITAT, Oxfam GB, PDT PMCC, PU SC, SP Shelter Custer, Solidarites International, Tearfund, UMCOR, UNEP, UNOPS, WFP, UNDP, UNHCR, UNESCO, UNFPA, URBATEX

Number of Projects

34

Cluster Objectives

  • Support the adequate return/relocation and integration of IDPs to their communities of origin.

  • Provision of basic services to most vulnerable groups, including IDPs, host families, and families who cannot return to their places of origin.

  • Support to the socio-economic integration of vulnerable groups, both in urban and rural areas, through inclusive job creation and income generating activities.

  • Disaster preparedness and contingency planning, particularly in the return and relocation areas.

  • Capacity development and reinforcement of local communities as well as national authorities to enhance coordination and ownership of the ER process.

Total Number of Beneficiaries

3 million affected people (1.3 million of IDPs and host families approximately)

Funds Requested

$115,114,021

Contact Information

Ugo Blanco: Ugo.Blanco@undp.org

Table: disaggregated number of affected population and beneficiaries



Category

Affected population

Beneficiaries

Female

Male

Total

Female

Male

Total

IDPs

660,000

640,000

1,300,000

660,000

640,000

1,300,000

Total Affected people

1,600,000

1,400,000

3,000,000

1,600,000

1,400,000

3,000,000


Overview

Almost a year after the earthquake, humanitarian needs in Haiti are still vast with approximately 1.3 million people living in camps and limited national leadership to lead the return to places of origin or the relocation of displaced families. According to preliminary estimations from the Shelter Cluster, by the end of 2011 there will be about 130,000 families still living in camps (650,000 people approximately) which indicates the significance of the humanitarian setting in Haiti for the months to come. Nevertheless, sustainable initiatives that may lead to long-term impacts must start to take place immediately to ensure adequate transition from the emergency/humanitarian phase to the rehabilitation and reconstruction of the affected areas.


ER is the term used to describe the process of recovery that begins in a humanitarian setting. ER encompasses the restoration of basic services, livelihoods, shelter, governance, security and the rule of law, environment and social dimensions, including the reintegration of displaced populations. It is guided by development principles in humanitarian settings and seeks to stabilize human security and address underlying risks that contributed to the crisis.
In the current Haitian context, ER activities have been identified as fundamental pillars for the return of IDPs and stabilization of the country. Time-critical initiatives such as debris removal, urban/rural planning or socio-economic reactivation through job creation, capacity development and vocational training are essential.
Although ER is mainstreamed in other clusters, these are specific initiatives and projects that need to be urgently implemented to ensure the adequate provision of basic services and the return/relocation and integration of displaced families.
Needs Analysis

There is wide consensus about all humanitarian actors that one of the main priorities is the organized and safe return/relocation and integration of IDPs either to their areas of origin, either with host families, either in relocation sites.


In order to facilitate this process, affected areas must meet at least minimum standards to properly house all displaced families. In this context, the clearance of all debris (almost 20 million cubic meters of debris remains) and the planning of urban and rural for a solution to the problem of housing for these people remain a top concern.
Another important factor is that, although major efforts will be made both from the GoH and from the national and international community, it is highly likely that an important number of IDPs will still remain in camps and informal settlements by the end of 2011. Consequently, it is crucial to ensure that basic services and adequate support is provided in these locations to ensure sufficient living standards. Finding the balance between encouraging IDPs to return/ to be relocated and the provision of basic services in camps will be a challenge in which the ER cluster can play a useful role.
Socio-economic reintegration or integration of affected families, including women and men as well as older people, youth and persons with disabilities capable and willing to work is essential at this stage. By supporting the restoration of livelihoods, affected populations can be encouraged to abandon the camps and return to their areas of origin (pull factor), thus preventing the creation of slums in new relocation sites. In this sense, ER economic initiatives will be initially related to debris removal and recycling as well as to the rehabilitation and socio-economic reconstruction of the affected communities. As other clusters are mainstreaming livelihoods into their projects, coordination across clusters will develop complementarities and reduce overlaps in implementation.
In order to create these conditions, and encourage displaced populations to return in conditions of dignity, they need urgent support to strengthen/create professional capacities in order to facilitate the difficult process of economic reintegration with improved conditions of employability with specific emphasis on incorporating women, youth and vulnerable people into the labour market. Skills training supported with the provision of tools and work capital will certainly constitute a stimulus to the return.
It is important to note that the earthquake has not only destroyed homes, but assets which many families used to make a living. The destruction of buildings and infrastructure has left a large number of micro and small entrepreneurs (operating in the so called informal sector) without their workshop, assets, tools and capital, and thereby a means to make a living and support their lives and their households. Consequently micro entrepreneurs (patrons) and their workers and apprentices have lost their job and means of leaving. Many of these newly unemployed people have been unable to sustain themselves and have been obliged to relocate to camps.
Frequent recurrent storms and cyclones make Haiti a very vulnerable country. With 1.3 million people living in camps, there is high risk of new catastrophes that could severely affect population that are unprepared. Disaster preparedness and contingency plans in camps and informal settlements are very much needed to prevent further casualties in the months to come.
In Haiti, as in any other country, the ownership of the ER phase must be with the affected population. Participation in the planning processes is essential for this. Also, due to some limitations at the national level and the new elections process that is taking place at the end of 2010, there is a need for the reinforcement of national and local leadership to lead in the identification and implementation of national strategies in all different domains, including the return of IDPs, debris management and urban planning amongst others.
In terms of target population, the ER Cluster has identified the need to emphasize the role that most vulnerable groups can play. Integration of older people and people with disabilities in the reactivation of the socio-economic nets is an asset that communities will benefit from with adequate integration programmes.
There is clear understanding that women and men have different needs in ER initiatives and these are being – and will be also in 2011 – taken into account to ensure that beneficiaries are not just recipients of the programmes but actual leaders of the recovery of their communities. In this context, Haitian women play a crucial role to encourage the return of families and their integration into the rehabilitated social and economic structures.
Geographically, ER activities will be focused in those areas where affected population are living, including camps but also host families in provinces. Also important is to recognize the existence of substantial needs beyond PaP, particularly in Léogâne, Jacmel, Petit Goâve, Grand Goâve, Gressier and other communities.
OBJECTIVE, OUTCOMES, OUTPUTS AND INDICATORS

Cluster Objective

Outcomes

Outputs

Indicator

1. Support the adequate return/relocation and integration of IDPto their communities of origin.

Adequate return to areas of origin.

Participatory monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of areas of return.

Regularly updated map of families registered in areas of origin.

Agreed road map on the return.

Existing return and relocation strategy.

By December 2011, at least 600,000 IDPs have returned to their neighbourhoods of origin or have been relocated in accordance with measures and standards defined in the Return Strategy.

Number of families reintegrating their green houses.



Debris have been removed including demolition of red houses.

More than five million cubic metres have been removed from affected areas by the end of 2011 combining high intensity labour with heavy equipment as needed.

Number of red houses demolished.



Damaged (yellow) houses have been repaired.

Number of yellow houses properly repaired and secured according to the needs of the occupants –ages, disabilities, etc. (December 2011)

Number of professionals trained to conduct repairs.



Urban and rural areas of return meet minimum living standards to house IDPs, including accessibility standards for people with disabilities.

There are existing urban plans for the reconstruction of affected areas in PaPand Léogâne (December. 2011).

Number of families that reintegrated their neighbourhoods of origin



Status of tenure is clarified is neighbourhoods on origin through participatory enumeration.

Grievance redress mechanisms are operational.



Number of families enumerated.

Number of neighbourhoods with participatory enumeration exercises validated by communities and local authorities.



Transitional proximity sites are organized.

Turnover of families in transitional sites.

Public information campaigns are conducted around the return strategy.

Number of neighbourhoods and associated camps covered by the campaign.

Adequate relocation in new sites including legal support to relocated families.

Participatory M&E of areas of return.

Regularly updated map of families registered in areas of relocation.

Relocation guidelines developed including land tenure issues.

Return and relocation strategy.

Urban and rural areas or relocation meet minimum living standards to house IDP.

There are existing urban plans for the relocation of affected areas in PaPand Léogâne (December 2011).

Support to the socio-economic integration of vulnerable groups, both in urban and rural areas, through inclusive job creation and income -generating activities.

Employment opportunities for most vulnerable groups, including women, older people and people with disabilities.

High Intensity labour opportunities are created in activities related to debris removal and recycling.

At least 200,000 people are employed in activities related to debris removal and recycling.

Activities related to the reconstructions of neighbourhoods.

At least 25,000 people are employed in activities related to debris removal and recycling.

Capacity development and vocational training for most vulnerable groups.

Training courses and practical education on jobs related to the rehabilitation and reconstruction of affected areas.

At least 10,000 households (including women) receive some sort of formal vocational training on activities related to the rehabilitation and reconstruction of affected areas.

Access to seed capital, grants and micro-credit.

Support to micro-enterprises.

Number of micro-enterprises reactivated/created.

Safety net for most vulnerable groups.

Number of families who receive transitional economic support.

Disaster preparedness and contingency planning, particularly in neighbourhoods of origin and their associated camps and relocation areas. .

Camps return and relocation areas are prepared for the hurricane season.

Participatory disaster preparedness measures are in place in camps, return and relocation sites.

Disaster preparedness measures are in place in 100% of the camps with the active participation of the affected population.

Camps return and relocation areas have contingency plans.

Contingency plans are elaborated for camps, return and relocation sites.

Participatory and inclusive contingency plans have been elaborated, diffused and tested in 100% of the camps and relocation areas.

Risks are mitigated in neighbourhoods of origin, their associated camps and transitional proximity sites.

Security measures are implemented in neighbourhoods of origin, their associated camps and transitional proximity sites.

Number of participatory risk mapping exercises conducted.


Capacity development and reinforcement of local communities as well as local and national authorities to enhance coordination and ownership of the ER process.

Local communities have the capacity to organize their return or relocation.

Information management and support to local communities for social mobilization and planning.

Number of neighbourhoods with community-led coordination committees.

All ER initiatives are planned in a participatory manner and implemented with full engagement of the community taking into account their needs, capacities and interests.



Capacities of local authorities and ministries are strengthened to coordinate the implementation of the return and relocation strategy.

Municipal support centres for housing and neighbourhoods are established and work with line ministries.

Availability of information to be used by the central government, local authorities, implementing partners and communities.




National authorities have the capacity to coordinate the planning and implementation of ER initiatives.

Assistance for the formulation of ER strategies and its different components (debris, urban planning, livelihoods, etc.).

By mid-2011, an ER National Strategy has been developed and implemented.


Sectoral monitoring plan

The ER Cluster will meet on a weekly basis, or as agreed by all the members, to ensure proper follow up of programmes and projects. The 3W matrix with information related to who is doing what, where and when will be updated on a monthly basis.


In addition, the already established thematic working groups (debris management, housing and neighbourhoods and livelihoods) will ensure an adequate technical monitoring of activities and proper strategic guidance during formulation and implementation. Additional sub-working groups may be created to coordinate and monitor activities in specific areas such as conditional cash-transfers. The Working Group on Housing, Land and Property existing under the Protection Cluster will also provide key inputs to the work of the ER Cluster.
The ER Cluster and the Working Groups will elaborate an action plan for the year that will benchmark progresses and establish monitoring indicators to assess the work of the groups. These plans will be agreed with all cluster members and endorsed by the Strategic Advisory Group of the ER Cluster.



SITE / AREA

ORGANIZATIONS

Port-au-Prince

IOM, UNDP, UNOPS, SP UN-HABITAT, UNFPA, Caritas Austria, EPER, Lausanne/HEKS, FAU, Haven, AHV, URBATEX, Tearfund, EdM, ILO, PU, GRUEEDH, HelpAge International, CW, Oxfam GB, SC, HelpAge International

Léogâne

All Hands Volunteers, UNDP, SP, Tearfund, ILO, SC, IOM

Jacmel

Haven, ILO, DWHH, SC, IOM

Border Area

UNHCR



Education


Cluster Lead Agencies

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF) and

SAVE THE CHILDREN (SC )

Cluster Partners

ACDI, ACT Alliance/FCA, ActionAid, ADEPFOMA, AECID, Aide et Action, AIR, ALEHA, ARI, Ambassade de France, America Continental 2000, AME-SADA, AMURT International, Architecture for Humanity, AVISER-HAITI, AVSI, AWO, International Builders International, CARE, CARITAS Austria, CARITAS Suisse, CEEC, CESVI, CHR, CISP, CNEH, COCEQ La cour des Enfants de Quettstar, Collège Frère Hebrey, CW, CONEH, Congrégation des Soeurs Salésiennes, CRAD/CEAAL, CRA CRS, CSDI, DDC, Confédération suisse, DFID, Digicel Foundation, EDC, Editions Deschamps, ESF, EMDH , EPER, FLM, FONHEP, FH, Foyer Chrétien, FPGL, FPN , Fundación CUME, GIC, GIEL Grace International, GVC, HP, Haiti Relief and Development, Inc., Haiti Vision Inc., H.E.R.O., ID, INTERSOS, IRC, IRW, KNH, LBL, MEHPHAE, Mercy Corps, MIPROS, MEDH/IAAS, MED/ IGPEH, MIT, NCA, NICCO,OLE, OI, PWJ, PIN, Plan Haiti & Plan International, PRODEV, REPT, Reseau Haitien des Ecoles Associees, RET, RTI International, SC, Scouts d’Haiti, SAD, SJRM, Sol Haiti, St. Joseph de Cluny, Tearfund, Terre des Hommes Italy, TIPA, UMCOR, UNEP, UNEPAM, FONCOMA, UNESCO, UNICEF, UNNOH, OCHA, UNOPS, USAID, USAID PHARE/AIR, VIVA RIO, War Child Canada, WFP, World Bank, WHl, WSM, WVI

Number of Projects

15

Cluster Objectives

  • Ensure access to quality education of 425,000 children aged 4-18 years (pre-school and primary) in the geographical areas of: (i) return, (ii) relocation and (iii) host communities.

  • Ensure access to quality education to 360,000 children living in camps.

  • Build capacities of 500 partners including government officials, NGOs, educational personnel and teachers, on DRR.

  • Build capacities of the education authorities at national, local and school level on planning, coordination, data collection and management.

Beneficiaries

785,000 children and 25,000 teachers affected by the earthquake

Funds Requested

$32,898,882

Contact Information

Mohamed Fall: mmfall@unicef.org


Needs Analysis

Almost one year after the earthquake, despite the huge amount of work which has already been carried out, the education sector continues to face a tremendous challenge to recover from the disaster. Despite an enormous demand for education among the population of Haiti, anecdotal evidence reveals that more children are out of school, compared to the already distressing figure of 50%-55% during the pre-earthquake. Out of 3,978 schools that the earthquake damaged, many of them have been cleared of debris by local communities as well as the Education Cluster partners, yet about 32% still remain in need of debris removal.19 This not only hampers the efforts to establish temporary and semi-permanent facilities to reopen schools, but exposes children to dangers and fears due to proximity to buildings which need demolition.20


Adequate and functioning learning spaces continue to be of the greatest need. The deterioration of school tents and other materials for temporary learning spaces is accelerating. Despite the efforts by the members of the education sector in the provision of semi-permanent and transitional structures (currently ongoing in 435 schools in the affected areas21), there is still a huge need for learning spaces. Based on the five-year plan of operation recently finalized by the Ministry of Education (MoE), the number of classrooms immediately needed is three times higher than what is available. In many schools, children are still studying in very precarious conditions, lacking school furniture, teaching and learning materials, blackboards and proper water and sanitation facilities.
Massive displacement and the loss of livelihoods caused by the earthquake leave many parents in an even more difficult position compared to prior to the earthquake to support the education of their children. The cost is high, comprising school fees, learning materials, uniforms, shoes and transport. According to the latest data by the IOM, there are still approximately 472,000 children of 4-18 years old living in the camps.22 Many of the displaced children who are going to school are commuting a long distance to the schools of their origin before the earthquake, because of lack of schools available nearby the camps, thus mounting the cost of transport. Anecdotal evidence indicates that less than 50% of children in the camps attend school, mainly because of financial reasons.
It is not only in the earthquake-hit areas of the department of west, south-east and Nippes, the areas such as Artibonite and central, departments have received an influx of over 100,000 school-going-age children from the directly affected areas. This puts a huge strain on schools in those areas in terms of learning spaces, materials and the number of teachers.
The earthquake also made a number of children without parent care, children with physical and mental disabilities, requiring additional attention and support. There are also many children who stopped going to school because of the fear for buildings, and need psycho-social care.
While teachers also need psycho-social support to overcome mounting hardships, they are facing a massive requirement to improve their capacity on adapted curriculum and programme in order to respond to the different needs of children within the limited hours of instruction. In the non-public sector, which represents more than 80% of education provision in the country, teachers are facing financial difficulties due to the long interruption of the school year and increased difficulties for the parents to pay the school fees.
Haiti not only has suffered the earthquake, but the island is prone to various natural disasters such as hurricanes and epidemic diseases such as cholera. Thus, the training of teachers and students on the preparedness in the disaster-prone areas, the treatment of water resources and the enforcement of hygiene promotion are necessary to minimize the risk of affecting the schools and students. With an HIV prevalence rate of 2.2% and a context of increased vulnerabilities and risks (e.g. high rates of sexual violence), it is important to make sure that teachers are trained on HIV/AIDS and on developing and implementing life skills-based HIV education.
The scale of the emergency brought a very large number of humanitarian organizations to the education sector in Haiti. Those who have a longer history in Haiti have also seen the scope their work significantly broadened. This situation creates a persistent need to support the Government in coordinating and harmonizing the intervention.
The establishment of a reliable information system within the sector is another urgent need in order to collect and manage appropriate data on the status of destroyed schools, displaced children. The capacity needs to be built within the system to coordinate the massive volume of partners’ programme.
Priority Needs Identified

Given the critical condition of the education section in Haiti, there is a vast range of need at all levels: access, quality and governance. In 2011, the Education Cluster will focus on providing relief, to reduce the burden of children directly and indirectly affected by the earthquake, mainly those who are still living in camps, relocation site, or with host families.


In the areas directly affected by the earthquake:

  • Support interventions to demolish and remove debris from heavily damaged schools in order to install temporary learning spaces to facilitate access by learners enrolled before the earthquake, and children who have not had the opportunity to date.

  • Provide quality education in affected schools and learning spaces through training of educational personnel, strengthened school governance and supervision and school feeding programmes.

  • Advocate for incentives and subsidies to children attending non public schools through funding modalities agreed with the MoE.

  • Support creation of public schools in relocation sites.


In the areas indirectly affected by the earthquake:

  • identification and registration of new students who have been displaced from earthquake-affected areas.

  • integration of displaced children in congested host schools in provision of additional facilities such as learning spaces, water and sanitation facilities and school supplies

  • enhanced quality of education provision through teacher training on the adapted curriculum and classroom management, and support to school governance.


In all areas

  • Maintain psycho-social support for learners, parents and education personnel across the country who have been traumatized by the disaster.

  • Continued psycho-social training through intensive seminars across the ten departments aimed at inspectors, pedagogical counsellors, teachers and school directors on methodologies to reduce risk of trauma for children.

  • Training on HIV/AIDS and behaviours that put children at increased risk of HIV/AIDS and development and implementation of life skills-based HIV education.

  • Support to capacity development on DRR, contingency planning, the treatment of water resources and hygiene promotion across all departments.


Objectives

  1. Ensure access to quality education of 400,000 children aged 4-14 years (pre-school and primary) in the geographical areas of: (i) return, (ii) relocation and (iii) host communities.

  2. Ensure access to quality education to 250,000 children living in camps.

  3. Build capacities of 500 partners on DRR and hygiene promotion.

  4. Build capacities of the education authorities at national, local and school level on planning, coordination, data collection and management.


Estimated number of Children (beneficiaries) affected by the earthquake

Children affected

Nº of children (4-18 years old)

Target Enrolment

Total

Boys

Girls

Total

Boys

Girls

In Camps

479,500

234,955

244,545

359,625

176,216

183,409

Outside Camps

570,500

279,545

290,955

427,875

209,659

218,216

Total

1,050,000

514,500

535,500

785,500

384,895

400,605


Table of proposed coverage by appealing agencies per site

SITE / AREA

ORGANIZATIONS

Port-au-Prince,

Léogâne,

Gressier,

Petit Goâve,

Grand Goâve,

Jacmel and

Departments hosting IDPs23


ACDI, ACT Alliance/FCA, ActionAid, ADEPFOMA, AECID, AA, AIR, ALEHA, ARI, Ambassade de France, AMECON, AME-SADA, AMURT International, AFH, AVISER-HAITI, AVSI, AWO, International Builders International, CARE, CARITAS AUSTRIA, CARITAS Suisse, CEEC, CESVI, CHR, CISP, CNEH, COCEQ La cour des Enfants de Quettstar, Collège Frère Hebrey, CW, CONEH, Congrégation des Soeurs Salésiennes, CRAD/CEAAL, CRA, CRS, CSDI, DDC, Confédération suisse, DFID, Digicel Foundation, EDC, Editions Deschamps, ESF, EMDH, EPER, FLM, FONHEP, FH, Foyer Chrétien, FPGL, FPN,, Fundación CUME, GIC, GIEL, Grace International, GVC, Haiti Relief and Development, Inc., Haiti Vision Inc., HERO, ID, INTERSOS, IRC, IRW, KNH, Les Brébis de Lumière, MEHPHAE, Mercy Corps, MIPROS, Mission de l'espoir d'haiti/IAAS, MED/IGPEH, MIT, NCA, NICCO, OLE, Outreach International, PWJ, People in Need, Plan Haiti & Plan International, PRODEV, REPT, Reseau Haitien des Ecoles Associees, RET, RTI International, SC, Scouts d’Haiti, SAD, SJRM, Sol Haiti, St. Joseph Joseph de Cluny, Tearfund, Terre des Hommes Italy, TIPA, UMCOR, UNEP, UNEPAM, FONCOMA, UNESCO, UNICEF, UNNOH, OCHA, UNOPS, USAID, USAID PHARE/AIR, VIVA RIO, War Child Canada, WFP, World Bank, WHI, WSM, WVi.


Sectoral monitoring plan

To ensure the overall quality of project implementation, project staff within responsible agencies will monitor activities using already established mechanisms. The Cluster will monitor overall progress against objectives and indicators through its network of cluster partners and working closely with the Ministry of National Education and Professional Training (MENFP). Monitoring will take place periodically, using the already established activity tracking matrix and the indicator reporting, with a shifting focus from inputs in the initial six months to outcomes and impact by the end of this appeal period. For this purpose, a common framework for monitoring will be developed within the Education Cluster, closely linked to the monitoring efforts of Government and other partners working in the education sector and other clusters. Baselines will be established through existing documentation and needs assessments currently underway.





LOGFRAME 

Indicators

Means of Verification

Objectives 1-2

1) Ensure access to quality education for 425,000 children of 4 - 18 years old (pre-school and primary) in the areas of return, relocation, and host community.

Percentage of children (4-18 years old) having access to school in the areas of return and relocation.
Percentage of IDP children having access to schools within host communities.

Camp and school survey

2) Ensure access to quality education to 350,000 children in the camps.

Percentage of children (4-18 years old) having access to school.

Camp survey

Activities

a) Debris clearance in 300 schools.

Number of affected schools cleared of debris.

MENFP (for affected schools)
Education Cluster report
MTPTC/United Nations Office of Project Services database
MINUSTAH data

b) Semi-permanent school construction and equipment in 600 schools including preschool, primary and secondary.

Number of semi-permanent schools constructed.
Number of schools repaired/rehabilitated.

Number of schools repaired/equipped.



MENFP and Cluster members records

c) Teacher training for 15,000 teachers.

Number of teachers trained on the adapted curriculum and psycho-social support.

Number of teachers trained on HIV/AIDS and life skills education.



MENFP and Cluster members records

d) Supply of teaching and learning materials for 425,000 students.

Number of students receiving learning kits.
Number of teachers receiving teaching kits.

MENFP and Cluster members records

e) Advocacy for increasing the school budget allocations.

Number of schools benefiting from financial support.

MENFP and Cluster members records

Objective 3

Build capacities of 5000 partners (including government, NGO, educational personnel, teachers, etc.) on DRR.

Percentage of education departments with disaster preparedness and response plans.
Number of schools with disaster preparedness and response plans.

MENFP and Cluster members records

Activities

Training of 5,000 partners on DRR.

Number of education officials and partners trained on DRR.

Number of education officials and partners trained on hygiene promotion.



MENFP and Cluster members records

Enforcement of the required standard and guidelines in newly built school construction.

Number of semi-permanent schools which meet the required anti-seismic and cyclone standards.

MENFP and Cluster members records

Treatment of water resources in schools and training on hygiene promotion.

Number of schools which received water treatment materials.

Number of education officials trained on hygiene promotion.



MENFP and Cluster members records

Objective 4

Build capacities of 200 education authorities at national, local and school level on planning, coordination, data collection and management.

Percentage of education departments with a school database.


MENFP and Cluster members records




LOGFRAME 

Indicators

Means of Verification

Activities

a) Training of 200 education authorities on data collection and management.

Number of education departments with their personnel trained on data management.

MENFP and Cluster members records

b) Provision of equipment for national and regional education departments.

Number of equipments provided to national and regional education departments.

MENFP and Cluster members records

c) Training of 500 education officials on planning and coordination capacity-building.

Number of education officials trained on planning and coordination.

MENFP and Cluster members records

d) Co-organization of cluster-related coordination meetings with the government officials.

Percentage of national and sub-national clusters holding regular meetings (more than once a month).

MENFP and Cluster members records


Emergency Telecommunications


Cluster Lead Agency

WFP

Cluster Partners

IOM, NetHope, OCHA, MINUSTAH CITS, JOTC, WHO, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNICEF, WVI, Inveneo, IFRC, Communication Integration, SC, Oxfam, SP, RedR UK

Number of Projects

1

Cluster Objectives

  • Provide an extended reliable VHF/HF radio network independent from public infrastructure with coverage in PaP and department’s capitals to provide voice communications services for the safety and security of humanitarian workers in all areas of operation and complement the public infrastructure as it is being restored.

  • Strengthen national disaster preparedness and effective response through establishment of a voice and data communication system for Department of Civil Protection of the GoH.

  • To enhance and expand the existing UN data network through providing natural-disaster-prone data and connectivity backup solutions.

To achieve these objectives the projects will:



    • provide common security and data communication networks and services to the humanitarian community, concentrating mainly in departments of the country.

    • deploy a communication system for DPC Haiti.

    • train staff in efficient and appropriate use of telecommunications equipment and services.

Beneficiaries

All clusters and humanitarian agencies

Funds Requested

$2,416,201*

Contact Information

Karen Barsamian: Karen.barsamian@wfp.org

*Due to late submission, these project requirements are not included in the funding tables in this document, but will be included after appeal launch.
Needs Analysis

Emergency communications services provide relief workers with the vital means to communicate and coordinate so that relief can be provided within the shortest possible timeframe to reduce loss of life.


The continued deteriorating situation and the lack of proper communication tools make the working conditions difficult and hazardous. All UN agencies and NGOs operating in the country need to be given tools to better coordinate assessment, rescue and relief operations in the affected areas. Field missions need to be monitored and tracked for the safety and security of humanitarian staff. The increased risk of additional disasters and security situation deterioration underlines the importance of having a reliable common emergency telecommunications system.
During the last nine months of ETC’s activities in Haiti, majority of the goals and objectives set up at the beginning of the emergency response operations have been achieved, however several major gaps have been additionally identified. These gaps are subject to the following conditions:

  • drastic deterioration of the security situation in the country.

  • high-level risk of natural disasters and recent epidemic disease outbreak.

  • lack of locally available qualified and experienced IT and telecommunication specialists able to support and maintain deployed data and communications systems.

  • inadequate number of national internet service provider (ISP), IT and telecommunication companies that could provide data connectivity services on required level.

Despite the fact that several UN agencies, including MINUSTAH, and a number of NGOs in Haiti are working together to address these issues, some areas crucial to the normal functioning of UN Agencies and to the ability of humanitarian community and governmental institutions to respond effectively to natural disasters or epidemics, are still not covered and required continuous ETC coordination and heavy involvement both financially and technically.

Following gaps have been identified:


  1. Expansion of the VHF radio-network in departments of Haiti – overall situation in Haiti stipulates extensive usage of the radio communication for security and operational reasons. Additionally, recent experience shows that even after relatively small storm services from local GSM providers are being interrupted, leaving radios as the main communication means. Currently more than 70 UN agencies and NGOs are using radio-network deployed by ETC. However, recently increased demand requires expansion of the network, both in terms of coverage in new operational areas, as well as in deploying of additional communication channels to reduce the load.

  2. Strengthen national disaster preparedness and effective response through establishment of a voice and data communication system for DPC of the GoH – DPC, as the main body that supervises all governmental and humanitarian response during natural disasters, does not have basic communication means to manage and coordinates any relief operations. Several organizations are involved in building of the Emergency Operation Centre of DPC as well as for the development of emergency protocols and procedures, though these activities are not well coordinated and address this gap only partially.

  3. Data connectivity services for UN agencies and NGOs connected to ETC data network are still very unreliable despite the fact that several ISPs are being used by different organizations. No local ISP or IT companies are able to provide data connectivity services that satisfy standard requirements on downtime or failover (reliability) levels.

Therefore there is still a major challenge to provide the capacity and geographic replacements for these services to the humanitarian community and governmental counterparts. To address these problems there is a need to provide IT services to the humanitarian community in the new common operational areas and expand services in existing ones, where possible. Similarly the existing VHF and HF security communications network that operates 24x7 and currently has radio rooms in six locations (PaP, Jacmel, Léogâne, Hinche, Gonaïves and Cap Haïtien) serving more than 1,500 humanitarian workers from both UN agencies and NGOs, must be expanded to cover the new areas of operations. There is an important need to ensure users are trained and able to make optimal use of the available IT and telecommunications services.


Objectives

  • Provide an extended reliable VHF/HF radio network independent from public infrastructure with coverage in PaP and department’s capitals to provide voice communications services for the safety and security of humanitarian workers in all areas of operation and complement the public infrastructure as it is being restored.

  • Strengthen national disaster preparedness and effective response through establishment of a voice and data communication system for Department of Civil Protection of the GoH.

  • To enhance and expand the existing UN data network through providing natural disaster prone data and connectivity backup solutions.

To achieve these objectives the projects will:



  • provide common security and data communication networks and services to the humanitarian community, concentrating mainly in departments of the country.

  • deploy a communication system for DPC Haiti.

  • train staff in efficient and appropriate use of telecommunications equipment and services.

  • emergency communications services provide relief workers means to communicate and coordinate so relief can be provided within possible timeframe reducing loss of life.

Continued deteriorating situation and lack of proper communication tools make working conditions difficult and hazardous. UN agencies and NGOs operating in the country need tools to better coordinate assessment, rescue and relief operations in affected areas. Field missions need to be monitored and tracked for safety and security of humanitarian workers. The increased risk of additional disasters and security situation deterioration underlines the importance of a reliable emergency telecommunications system.


During last nine months of ETC’s activities, majority of objectives at the beginning of the emergency response have been achieved and major gaps have been identified. These gaps are subject to following points:

  • Drastic deterioration security situation.

  • High-level risk of natural disasters and recent epidemic disease outbreak.

  • Lack of qualified IT and telecommunication specialists to support and deploy data and communications systems.

  • Inadequate number of national ISP, IT and telecommunication companies which provide data connectivity services on required level.

Despite that several UN agencies, including MINUSTAH, and a number of NGOs working together to address these issues, some areas crucial to normal functioning of UN agencies and to the ability of humanitarian community and governmental institutions to respond effectively to natural disasters or epidemics, are still not covered and required continuous ETC coordination and involvement both financially and technically.


The following gaps have been identified:

  1. Expansion of VHF radio-network in departments of Haiti – overall situation stipulates extensive usage of radio communication for security and operational reasons. Recent experience shows that even small storm services from local GSM providers are interrupted, leaving radios as the main communication means. Currently more than 70 UN agencies and NGOs are using radio-network deployed by ETC. Recently increased demand requires expansion of the network, in terms of coverage in new operational areas, as well as in deploying of additional communication channels.

  2. Strengthen national disaster preparedness and effective response through establishment of a voice and data communication system for DPC of the Government – DPC supervises all governmental and humanitarian response during natural disasters does not have basic communication means to coordinate relief operations. Several organizations are involved in building the Emergency Operation Centre of DPC as well as for the development of emergency protocols, though activities are not well coordinated and address this gap only partially.

  3. Data connectivity services for UN agencies and NGOs connected to ETC data network are still very unreliable despite that several ISPs are being used by different organizations. No local ISP or IT companies are able to provide data connectivity services that satisfy standard requirements on reliability levels.


Needs

There is still a major challenge to provide capacity and geographic replacements for these services to the humanitarian community and governmental counterparts. There is a need to provide IT services to the humanitarian community in the new operational areas and expand services in existing ones. Similarly the existing VHF and HF security communications network that operates 24x7 and currently has radio rooms in six locations (Port au Prince, Jacmel, Léogâne, Hinche, Gonaïves and Cap Haïtien) serving more than 1,500 humanitarian workers ( UN agencies and NGOs), must be expanded to cover the new areas of operations. An important need to ensure users are trained and able to make optimal use of the available IT and telecommunications services.



  1. Expansion of the VHF radio-network in departments of Haiti – overall situation in Haiti stipulates extensive usage of the radio communication for security and operational reasons. Additionally, recent experience shows that even after relatively small storm services from local GSM providers are being interrupted, leaving radios as the main communication means. Currently more than 70 UN agencies and NGOs are using radio-network deployed by ETC. However, recently increased demand requires expansion of the network, both in terms of coverage in new operational areas, as well as in deploying of additional communication channels to reduce the load.

  2. Strengthen national disaster preparedness and effective response through establishment of a voice and data communication system for DPC of the GoH – DPC, as the main body that supervises all governmental and humanitarian response during natural disasters, does not have basic communication means to manage and coordinates any relief operations. Several organizations are involved in building of the Emergency Operation Centre of DPC as well as for the development of emergency protocols and procedures, though these activities are not well coordinated and address this gap only partially.

  3. Data connectivity services for UN agencies and NGOs connected to ETC data network are still very unreliable despite the fact that several ISPs are being used by different organizations. No local ISP or IT companies are able to provide data connectivity services that satisfy standard requirements on downtime or failover (reliability) levels.

Therefore there is still a major challenge to provide the capacity and geographic replacements for these services to the humanitarian community and governmental counterparts. To address these problems there is a need to provide IT services to the humanitarian community in the new common operational areas and expand services in existing ones, where possible. Similarly the existing VHF and HF security communications network that operates 24x7 and currently has radio rooms in six locations (PaP, Jacmel, Léogâne, Hinche, Gonaïves and Cap Haïtien) serving more than 1,500 humanitarian workers from both UN agencies and NGOs, must be expanded to cover the new areas of operations. There is an important need to ensure users are trained and able to make optimal use of the available IT and telecommunications services.


Activities

  1. Expansion of the VHF radio-network in departments of Haiti – overall situation in Haiti stipulates extensive usage of the radio communication for security and operational reasons. Additionally, recent experience shows that even after relatively small storm services from local GSM providers are being interrupted, leaving radios as the main communication means. Currently more than 70 UN agencies and NGOs are using radio-network deployed by ETC. However, recently increased demand requires expansion of the network, both in terms of coverage in new operational areas, as well as in deploying of additional communication channels to reduce the load.

  2. Strengthen national disaster preparedness and effective response through establishment of a voice and data communication system for DPC of the GoH – DPC, as the main body that supervises all governmental and humanitarian response during natural disasters, does not have basic communication means to manage and coordinates any relief operations. Several organizations are involved in building of the Emergency Operation Centre of DPC as well as for the development of emergency protocols and procedures, though these activities are not well coordinated and address this gap only partially.

  3. Data connectivity services for UN agencies and NGOs connected to ETC data network are still very unreliable despite the fact that several ISPs are being used by different organizations. No local ISP or IT companies are able to provide data connectivity services that satisfy standard requirements on downtime or failover (reliability) levels.

Therefore there is still a major challenge to provide the capacity and geographic replacements for these services to the humanitarian community and governmental counterparts. To address these problems there is a need to provide IT services to the humanitarian community in the new common operational areas and expand services in existing ones, where possible. Similarly the existing VHF and HF security communications network that operates 24x7 and currently has radio rooms in six locations (Port-au-Prince, Jacmel, Léogâne, Hinche, Gonaïves and Cap Haïtien) serving more than 1,500 humanitarian workers from both UN agencies and NGOs must be expanded to cover the new areas of operations. There is an important need to ensure users are trained and able to make optimal use of the available IT and telecommunications services.


Outcomes

  1. Expanded and comprehensive emergency telecommunications and data connectivity networks and services to the humanitarian community provided.

  2. Coordinated, predictable, timely and efficient emergency telecommunications response under the cluster approach.

  3. Deployed basic data and telecommunications system for DPC.

  4. Provided availability and support of IT and telecommunications services that support the DPC to coordinate preparedness and relief operations of all humanitarian actors.

  5. Trained staff in efficient and appropriate use of telecommunications equipment and services.

  6. Improved security environment, increased control and discipline on HF/VHF radio-networks, reduced misuse.




Objective: Provide expanded and comprehensive emergency telecommunications and data connectivity networks and services to the humanitarian community

Measurable indicators expected results and achievements

  • ETC project plan prepared and approved based on initial assessment.

  • Number of local humanitarian organizations receiving emergency telecommunications and data-communication services.

  • Local ETC Working Group established and regular meetings held.

  • Number of fully MOSS compliant COMCEN established in operational areas.

  • Average downtime of the common data network.

Impact:

  • Coordinated, predictable, timely and efficient emergency telecommunications response under the Cluster approach.

Objective: Deploy basic data and telecommunications system for Civil Protection Department

Measurable Indicators Expected results and achievements

  • Number of DPC offices in departments that are connected to the common infrastructure.

  • Emergency Operations Centre is fully functioning.

Impact:

  • Availability and support of IT and telecommunications services that support the DPC to coordinate preparedness and relief operations of all humanitarian actors.

Objective: Train staff in efficient and appropriate use of telecommunications equipment and services




Measurable Indicators Expected results and achievements

  • Training programmes on use of ETC services provided – and number of individuals and group training programmes.




Impact:

  • Improved security environment, increased control and discipline on HF/VHF radio-networks, reduced misuse.



The inputs required fro the project successful implementation consists of the following:



  • Funds required to purchase equipment and services both local and international.

  • Qualified technical staffing to implement the project.

In specific practical terms this will include:



  • operational and cost-effective IT MOSS-compliant facilities and common emergency telecommunications network providing security voice and data communications.

  • common security communications and data communications within all common operational bases in and around the PaP area.

  • optimal use of existing MINUSTAH IT and network facilities by humanitarian organizations.


Sustainability and Phasing Out Issues

  • Local capacity development.

  • Future transition of ETC coordination activities: after ETC phasing out, a common Information and Telecommunication Technologies Working Group should be established, comprised of existing ETC members (UN and NGO’s) and if required may include representatives of industry partners (private sector or other NGOs that are providing connectivity services).

  • To investigate the possibility of establishing common data network on a cost recovery basis to replace existing funding sources.

  • Closer cooperation with MINUSTAH – handing over security communication processes to MINUSTAH COMCEN in case of lowering of the security phase or not enough funds to perform 24/7 UN COMCENs operations. Several issues have to be addressed prior to the hand-over:

    • several NGOs are reluctant to communication directly to the military portion of MINUSTAH or UNDSS, therefore a buffer / interface (similar to ETC) is required.

    • a Standard Opeartional Procedure has to be finalized, adopted by all parties and introduced into the operations.

    • a Memorumdum of Understanding between all participating parties might be required.

      • More robust and weather-proof infrastructure development.

Food Aid


Cluster Lead Agency

WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME (WFP)

Cluster Participants

ACDI/ VOCA, ACF, ADRA, Caritas Haiti, CESVI, Concern, Convoy of Hope, CRS, CARE, GOAL, GoH, Haitian Red Cross, IR, IFRC, MSF, PU, Oxfam, SP, SC, SA, TdH, UNICEF, FAO, World Relief Haiti, WVI, Welthungerhilfe (GAA), Mercy Corps, SC, Viva Rio, HI, HelpAge International, HP, CORDAID, FAO, SP

Number of Projects

5

Cluster Objectives

  • Continue to respond to the immediate needs of poor and vulnerable food-insecure households.

  • Increase the resilience of vulnerable households to shocks and enhance their ability to preserve assets through risk mitigation measures.

  • Strengthen emergency preparedness and response particularly in disaster prone areas through contingency planning and food prepositioning for timely response.

  • Support in building government, local and community-based capacities in food security programmes, disaster preparedness and response.

Beneficiaries

2,461,500 people

Funds Requested

$101,987,574

Contact Information

Philip Ward Cluster Coordinator, E-mail: Philip.ward@wfp.org


Need Analysis

A follow-up EFSA II was conducted in June 2010. It found that the prevalence of food insecurity in the areas directly affected by the earthquake had dropped from 52% in February to 39% in June. Access to livelihood activities as well as stabilization of food prices and availability in markets has contributed to this improvement. However, the prevalence of food insecurity remains well above pre-earthquake levels primarily because economic activities have still not reached levels in place before January 2010. There are estimated to be between 2.5 million and three million food-insecure people nationally in Haiti. Although the prevalence of food insecurity is higher in the directly affected areas than the non-directly affected areas, there are more food-insecure people living outside the directly affected areas of the country.


The levels of food insecurity in the camps are similar to those of vulnerable people outside of the camps. In the urban camps, 39% of inhabitants are food-insecure. In rural areas, 49% face food insecurity. However camp inhabitants are at risk to future shocks as a result of their lack of household assets.
In parallel, a FAO/ WFP Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission were conducted in June and July 2010. The Mission found that food production in Haiti is slowly recovering but remains significantly below the levels that existed prior to the January 2010 earthquake. Haiti’s spring harvest, compared to 2009, saw bean production drop by 17% and declines in maize, sorghum and plantain of 8%, 4% and 5%, respectively. The total import requirement in the 2010/2011 marketing year is put at 711,000 MTs (cereal equivalent) of which 525,000 MTs are expected to be imported commercially. This leaves an uncovered deficit of some 186,000 MTs.
A joint MoH/ UNICEF nutrition survey was undertaken between April and June 2010 found that the nutritional situation of infants had not deteriorated thanks to humanitarian actions including a blanket supplementary feeding programme for pregnant and lactating mothers and children under five. Nevertheless, 6% of children are acutely malnourished and as many as 31.7% are chronically malnourished. PLW and children under five continue to remain vulnerable and in need of ongoing assistance programmes.
Objectives

To continue to protect vulnerable food-insecure households and individuals while supporting government and local capacities to build resilience to recurrent shocks. At the same time, and given the country’s ongoing vulnerability to shocks, to ensure emergency preparedness measures and prepositioning of food stocks in key locations.


This assistance will be provided through the following specific activities:
Nutrition: food rations will be provided to malnourished children from 6 to 59 months and PLW through mother and child health programmes in areas with high food insecurity and under nutrition rates. The cluster will continue to treat moderate malnutrition through targeted supplement feeding for both children 6-59 months with moderate acute malnutrition and malnourished PLW. 75,000 children under five and 48,500 PLW will benefit from targeted supplementary feeding. The cluster will also provide assistance to 12,000 HIV/TB patients and their families (60,000 beneficiaries) given their particular vulnerability. All nutrition activities will be implemented in line with the Government’s Nutrition Strategy and in close collaboration with the nutrition cluster and its members.
School Feeding is a key element of the cluster’s support to social safety nets in Haiti addressing the needs of school age children and their families. It is also recognized as having an important role in the rebuilding of the education sector, which was particularly hard hit by the earthquake. During the school year in 2011 the Cluster aims to assist 800,000 children, out of which 60% are girls. One of WFP’s corporate objectives of the school feeding programme is to promote girls’ education and retention of girls in school.
Cash and food-for-work activities provide an essential food safety net while also supporting people to restore and rebuild their communities and livelihoods. The projects will be implemented in areas affected by shocks and in shock-prone areas to support disaster mitigation efforts at the community level. The Cluster plans to employ 100,000 workers through the programme. As rations are provided based on an average household of five, the programme will support some 500,000 beneficiaries. Cash has proven to be the best mechanism to support access to food in urban areas affected by the quake, while a mix of food and cash is employed in the rural areas where market supply can only partially meet the increased demand for food.
Given Haiti’s ongoing vulnerability to hurricanes, cyclones, flooding and earthquakes, the Cluster will continue to maintain emergency preparedness and prepositioning of food stocks in key locations around the country. This will ensure that the Cluster is prepared to respond with food supplies should future disasters strike. The Cluster will work closely with Government and local communities to build capacity at all levels in emergency preparedness and response.
Gender and Protection issues form an integral part of the cluster’s programme. The design of programme interventions, especially under F/CFW takes into account activities that promote the specific needs of the beneficiaries, especially women. Women are fully represented in Food and Cash Management Committees. In the monitoring of all programme interventions, gender –disaggregated data is crucial to reporting on progress in meeting targets and informing future interventions. The cluster will continue to implement and augment a range of measures aimed at preventing sexual abuse and exploitation in its programmes.
Outcomes

  1. Improved food consumption over assistance period for targeted emergency-affected households.

  2. Increased resilience to shocks for vulnerable households through various mitigation programme interventions for assets creation and preservation.

  3. Contingency plan is place and stocks prepositioned.

  4. Disaster mitigation measures in place with WFP capacity development support, assets built and restored for targeted communities.

Results chain

Performance indicators

Data source

Strategic Objective 1: Continue to respond to the immediate food needs of poor and vulnerable food-insecure households/households in disaster situations

Outcome 1.1 Improved food consumption over assistance period for targeted emergency affected households.

1.1.1 Household food consumption score exceeds 26 for 75% of targeted households.

1.1.2 ART adherence rate of 95%.

1.1.3 TB treatment success rate of 85.


  • CNSA data

  • Vulnerability and analysis mapping (VAM) report

  • Cluster members reports /WFP M&E data

  • Baseline survey for survival/ adherence/TB treatment completion rates will be undertaken in early 2011

Outcome 1.2

Stabilized acute malnutrition in children 6–59months in targeted populations affected by emergencies, through Blanket Supplementary Feeding.



1.2.1 Prevalence of mid-upper arm circumferences (MUAC) ≤ 5%.

  • Survey data

  • MoH, UNICEF, WFP and Cluster partners reports ,

Output 1.1 Food and NFIs distributed in sufficient quantity and quality, to PLW, children 6-59 months and PLWHIV and TB receiving ART through supplementary feeding.

1.1.1 Actual amount of food distributed by commodity type and activity as a percentage of planned distributions.

1.1.2 Actual number of targeted beneficiaries receiving food and non food assistance by activity as percentage of planned beneficiaries.



  • Distribution plans and M&E reports.

Strategic Objective 2: Increase the resilience of vulnerable households to shocks and enhance their ability to preserve assets through risk mitigation measures’

Outcome 2.1: Adequate food consumption over assistance period for targeted emergency affected households at risk of falling into acute hunger.

2.1.1 Household food consumption score stabilized at 40% or more for 75% of targeted households.

  • CNSA and VAM data/studies.

  • Clusters’ members reports.

Outcome 2.2: Hazard risk reduced at community level in targeted communities through C/FFW activities.

2.2.1 Community asset score.

  • Partner reports and M&E data.

Output 2.2(a): Food and NFI distributed in sufficient quantity and quality to targeted beneficiaries through C/FFW activities under secure conditions.

2.1.1 Actual amount of food distributed by commodity type and activity as a percentage of planned distributions.

2.1.2 Actual number of targeted beneficiaries receiving food and non food assistance by activity as percentage of planned beneficiaries.



  • Partner reports M & E data.

Output 2.2(b): Cash distributed in sufficient quantity and on time to targeted beneficiaries through C/FFW activities under secure conditions.

2.1.1 Total cash amount distributed as percentage of planned.

2.1.2 Number of beneficiaries receiving cash, as percentage of planned.

2.1.3 Number of women heads of household receiving cash as percentage of planned beneficiaries.

2.1.4 Beneficiaries receiving cash on time as percentage of planned.



  • Reliable local financial institution to ensure a timely delivery of cash payment in C/FFW activities.

Outcome 2.3: Adequate food consumption over assistance period for targeted emergency affected households.

2.3.1 Household food consumption score. Food consumption score stabilized at or greater than 40% for 75% of targeted households.

  • CNSA ,VAM and parrtners.

Outcome 2.4: Targeted communities in fragile or transition situations have increased access to assets.

2.4.1 Community asset score. Functioning, useful, productive assets increased for 80% of targeted communities.

  • Partners report /M &E data.

Outcome 2.5: Enrolment of girls and boys in schools assisted through school feeding stabilized at pre-crisis levels.

2.5.1 Enrolment (boys and girls): average annual rate of change in number of boys and girls enrolled in WFP-assisted primary schools.

2.5.2 Retention rate for girls and boys in post-crisis situations.

2.5.3 Continuation rate for girls and boys.


  • CNCA,( National Commission for School Feeding Programme) MoE, WFP and Cluster members reports.

  • MoE/UNICEF /CNCA Reports Affected schools’ infrastructure is functioning, including Partners’ storage capacity.

  • Same.

Outcome 2.6: Improved nutritional status of targeted children 6-59 months and PLW through targeted supplementary feeding.

2.6.1 Prevalence of acute malnutrition among children 6-59 months. Target: Weight/Height (W/H) <5%.

2.6.2 Prevalence of malnourished PLW. Target: MUAC (<21 cm) <5%.



  • MoH, WFP UNICEF and Cluster reports.

Output 2.7.1(a): Food and NFIs distributed in sufficient quantity and quality to targeted beneficiaries.

2.7.1 Actual amount of food distributed by commodity type and activity as a percentage of planned distributions.

2.7.2 Actual number of targeted beneficiaries receiving food and non-food assistance by activity as percentage of planned beneficiaries.



  • M&E data, cluster partners reports.

Output 2.71 (b): Cash distributed in sufficient quantity and on time to targeted beneficiaries under secure conditions.

2.7.1 Number of beneficiaries receiving cash, as percentage of planned.

2.7.2 Number of women heads of household receiving cash as percentage of planned beneficiaries.

2.7.3 Total cash amount distributed as percentage of planned.

2.7.4 Beneficiaries receiving cash on time as percentage of planned.



  • M&E data, cluster partners reports

Output 2.8: Developed, built or restored livelihood assets by targeted communities and individuals through C/FFW and Fund for Assistance activities.

2.8.1 Number of community assets created or restored by targeted communities and individuals.

  • M&E data, cluster partners reports

Output 2.9 (a): School feeding coverage aligned with programme of work.

2.9.1 (a) Number of schools assisted by WFP and cluster partners , as percentage of planned.

  • M&E data, cluster partners reports

Output 2.9 (b): Supply of de-worming tablets to primary schoolchildren through school feeding.

2.9.1 (b) Numbers of boys and girls receiving Albendazole tablets in WFP-supported schools, as percentage of planned.

3.3.2 Number of schools reached by the anti-parasite campaign, as percentage of planned.

3.3.3 Number of anti-parasite campaigns carried out, as percentage of planned.


  • M&E data, cluster partners reports

Strategic Objective 3: Strengthen emergency preparedness and response , particularly in disaster –prone areas through Contingency Planning and prepositioning of food stocks

Outcome 3.1: Contingency plan in place and regularly updated.

3.1.1 Contingency plan.

  • DPC data, WFP and Food Cluster members reports,

Outcome 3.2: Stocks pre-positioned in the high-risk disaster prone areas.

3.2.1 Quantity of food by type prepositioned by location

3.2.2 Planned beneficiary by sex per region.



Strategic Objective 4: Support in building government , local and community –based capacities in food security, disaster preparedness and response at all levels

Outcome 4.1: Early warning systems, contingency plans and food security monitoring systems in place and enhanced with WFP capacity development support.

4.1.1 Disaster Preparedness Index

  • CNSA, DPC and partner reports.

  • Early Warning reports.

Output 4.2 Disaster mitigation measures in place with WFP capacity development support; assets built and restored for targeted communities.

4.2.1 Risk reduction and disaster preparedness and mitigation systems created or restored by type and unit of measure: early warning systems, contingency plans, food security monitoring systems, watershed management, construction of irrigation, land rehabilitation, etc.

  • CNA, DPC , and cluster partners reports.

Health


Cluster Lead Agency

PAN-AMERICAN HEALTH ORGANIZATION/WORLD HEALTH ORRGANIZATION (PAHO/WHO)

Implementing Agencies

MSPP, MDM, DPC, ACF, AMI, ARC, AVSI, CARE International, Centre for Disease Control, FHED-INC, FND, HP, HHI, HI, HAS, HSC, HWA, IMC, IOM, IRC, MARCH, MDM-Canada, MDM-France, MDM-Greece, MDM-Suisse, MERLIN, MI, PIH, SC, UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF, WCC, WHI, WVI, PAHO/WHO

Number of Projects

68

Cluster/sector Objectives

  • Maintaining access to basic health services for the population directly or indirectly affected by the cholera outbreak.

  • Reinforce surveillance systems in order to identify trends in disease occurrence and outbreak control including in response to the ongoing cholera outbreak.

  • Rapid operational response to cholera-affected communities.

  • Support the MSPP in coordination of cholera response

  • Strengthen environmental health programmes, including water quality, and health promotion.

  • Strengthen Health Cluster coordination for effective service delivery and information sharing.

  • Strengthen timely and appropriate response to disasters and public health emergencies, including contingency planning.

  • Strengthen HIV/AIDS-related services and increase coverage.

Beneficiaries

(most of Haitian population)

Funds Requested

$135,647,361

Contact Information

Dr. Lea Guido (e-mail: guidole@hai.ops-oms.org)


Needs analysis

Cholera continues to spread throughout Haiti; the scientific consensus is that the outbreak has not yet reached its peak. The cumulative number of cholera cases between 20 October and 16 November was 49,418, out of which 40% (19,646) have been hospitalized. The cumulative number of deaths due to cholera was 1,186 (774 at the hospital level and 412 at the community level), which puts the in hospital case fatality rate at 3.9% and the mortality rate at 14.16 per 100,000 inhabitants.


Health partners are preparing for growing numbers of cases in currently affected areas, plus in areas not yet affected. Now that cholera vibrio has a foothold in the environment it could affect Haiti for a number of years.
The MSPP has developed a national strategy to respond to the cholera epidemic. It aims to protect families at the community level; strengthen primary health centres already operating across the nation; and establish a network of cholera treatment centres (CTCs) and strengthen hospitals for treatment of severe cases.
Currently, cholera services are being organized at three levels: CTCs, which are large stand-alone tents with an average capacity of 100-400 beds; cholera treatment units (CTUs), which are typically in or next to health facilities and have a smaller capacity than CTCs; and oral rehydration centres (ORCs), which treat patients with non-life-threatening conditions. CTUs are designed to allow hospitals or health centres to continue to function while providing care for cholera patients. This was a lesson learned from St. Marc where health facilities were quickly overwhelmed by cholera patients.
Health cluster partners have scaled up capacity throughout the country. One month after the first cases of cholera, 24 were providing cholera response health services in CTCs and CTUs. Throughout Haiti, 36 CTCs were operational with a total bed capacity of roughly 2,830. These centres and their current capacity will not meet the population’s needs as the outbreak grows.
Although a large number of partners are operating in Haiti, many areas are not covered for cholera treatment. Insufficient human resources remain a major gap in providing treatment to cholera patients. It takes an average staff of 130 people to manage a 100-bed CTC. Social mobilization and health promotion efforts need to be scaled up as people are still scared of cholera. Individuals with non-cholera health needs have refused to visit hospitals out of fear of contracting cholera. Decentralizing health services through capacity-building at the department level, which was an objective of the health sector following the earthquake, remains an important priority in addressing the cholera outbreak.
In the immediate aftermath of the devastating January 12 earthquake a nearly unparalleled health response was mobilized by aid organizations and the donor community. By the end of January, 396 international health agencies had arrived in Haiti to provide a diverse range of services. The mechanism by which these entities were coordinated was the PAHO/WHO-led Health Cluster.
In Haiti, health services were and continue to be delivered through four channels: public institutions, including state-run health centres and referral hospitals; private, non-profit organizations; mixed public and non-profit institutions owned by the state but operated by NGOs; and private, for-profit medical offices in PaP and other major cities. The Ministère de la Santé Publique et de la Population (MSPP, or MoHP) is responsible for the public health system, including the delivery of health services, policymaking and implementation, and management of the Government’s health budget.
Despite a call in the Haitian constitution for universal access to health care, it is estimated that roughly 40% of the population lacked access to care before the earthquake, particularly in rural areas of the country. Inaccessibility was based on both unaffordable financial services and distance from home to health facility.
In terms of pre-earthquake health facilities, there were 594 PHCs (with or without beds); 30 reference communal hospitals (30-60 beds each); six centres for integrated diagnostics, ten department hospitals (with 150 beds each); and three university hospitals (1,500 beds in total). The majority of financial support for health centres has come from foreign aid. Most struggled with consistent electrical supply, hygiene and sanitation measures, access to water, and financial sustainability. Human capital has been a barrier to the provision of health services, as the country lacks doctors, nurses and administrative professionals.
The challenges in the Health Sector have had tragic results for the Haitian population. Maternal mortality was 630 for every 100,000 live births and the average life expectancy was 55 years for females and 53 years for males. A new survey on the reproductive health of the earthquake-affected population shows that fertility has tripled from 4% to 12% and a peak delivery season is expected starting from November 2010 even though 60% of maternities are under tents or temporary shelter. The survey also shows that demand for family planning is high amounting to 74% of the surveyed informants. The HIV/AIDS prevalence prior to the earthquake was 2.2%. The generalized epidemic is the highest in the western hemisphere. The under-five mortality rate was 86 deaths per 1,000 live births. Acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, malaria, and dengue – underlying health threats to the population before the earthquake – have only increased with the affected population living in unsanitary camps.
The earthquake unleashed a catastrophic toll on health institutions. Eight hospitals were totally destroyed, and 22 seriously damaged in the three regions most affected by the earthquake (West, Nippes, South-East). In the Action Plan for National Recovery and Development of Haiti, the Government underlines the importance of rebuilding 30 of the existing 49 hospitals and related training structures in the three departments most heavily affected by the earthquake. Humanitarian and health partners have worked hard to ensure basic services are provided through field hospitals, mobile health clinics, and the creation of referral networks to functioning hospitals. The administrative infrastructure for the country was not spared, with the MSPP offices destroyed – causing the death of 200 MSPP staff – and medical and nursing schools damaged.
The Health Cluster supports the MoH in the areas of partner coordination, information management, emergency response, capacity-building and technical assistance. As Health Cluster coordinator, PAHO/WHO ensured health entities were not operating parallel response structures and that the health sector is a direct contributor to the national response mechanism. The Health Cluster advocated needs on behalf of the earthquake-affected population, and then addressed those needs with provision of services. These functions have been essential in PaP and other communities with large numbers of affected people. A Working Group on Reproductive Health is also operating under the leadership of MSPP and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) to coordinate reproductive health interventions and in particular the response to the increase in expected deliveries.
The displaced population significantly increased the pressure on health facilities in departments not directly affected by the earthquake. In the weeks and months after the earthquake, more than 1.5 million internally displaced Haitians settled in spontaneous settlement sites throughout PaP and other areas. Health Cluster partners collaborated on projects addressing acute health needs and pervasive threats associated with crowded and unhygienic living conditions. The Cluster helped to restart public health programmes such as outbreak control and environmental health, maternal and neonatal health, nutrition, GBV, HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria, dengue, mental health, health services delivery, and rehabilitation services for disabled people.
The strain on the health system is nationwide, as 300,000 were injured and many underwent amputations that will require life-long rehabilitation services. Thousands sought health care along the border with the Dominican Republic, the south east department, and in the north. The overwhelming number of individuals living in congested settlement sites in PaP and in other departments presented acute health risks that needed to be addressed. Seventeen field hospitals, 11 of which were run by military outfits, were established and provided care to thousands of patients. More than 345,000 boxes of essential medical supplies were provided to health cluster partners by March.
A system of disease surveillance using fixed health facilities and mobile clinics was established shortly after the earthquake and continues to provide analysis and weekly reports. The most commonly reported reasons for consultation have been acute respiratory infection, malaria, and acute watery diarrhoea. A post-disaster vaccination programme was designed and implemented to immunize the affected population against diphtheria, tetanus, measles and rubella. At the end of May, over 900,000 vaccine doses had been administered to the most vulnerable populations.
By June, Médecins sans frontières (MSF) alone provided emergency medical care to more than 173,000 patients since the earthquake and had a 1,000-bed capacity throughout 19 health facilities. Today, 21 international health organizations are covering 266 spontaneous settlement sites.
Going forward, the Health Cluster will work to improve access to and quality of primary healthcare. The MoH proposed a strategy for reconstruction (Plan Intérimaire du Secteur Santé) which has outlined the parameters of rebuilding the Haitian health system and addresses the following objectives: ensuring provision of health services in settlement sites; ensuring continuity of services in all structures of the Health Sector, including emerging needs; identifying affected structures and developing reconstruction plans; rehabilitating affected structures of priority; facilitating financial access to services and ways to support vulnerable groups such as pregnant women, children under five, disabled peoples, and people with psychological trauma caused by the earthquake; maintaining and reinforcing governance and capacity of the MSPP to implement essential public health functions at all levels; reinforcing the MSPP capacity for disaster response; reinforcing public hygiene and sanitation measures; and building capacity through government and non-government partnerships.
Reconstruction of damaged hospitals and development of new hospitals is an essential activity for the health sector – particularly as it relates to emergency room care. It is essential to ensure that all new health facilities and the reconstruction of the existing health structure incorporate mitigation measures to make them resistant to future events. Nine departmental hospitals have been identified to be strengthened in an effort to decentralize the health care system. Building health care capacity will be done through trainings for mid-level health professionals.
The provision of health services will become more challenging as NGOs began to leave Haiti and funding sources are depleted. Coverage offered by mobile clinics in settlement sites will be reduced and efforts must be made to reinforce fixed health facilities to address gaps in coverage. The challenge in the coming year will be ensure that the transition from provision of humanitarian relief towards the rebuilding of a more sustainable health sector is made.
Objectives

  • Maintaining access to basic health services for the population directly or indirectly affected by the cholera outbreak.

  • Reinforce surveillance systems in order to identify trends in disease occurrence and outbreak control including in response to the ongoing cholera outbreak.

  • Rapid operational response to cholera-affected communities.

  • Support the MSPP in coordination of cholera response.

  • Strengthen environmental health programmes, including water quality, and health promotion.

  • Strengthen Health Cluster coordination for effective service delivery and information sharing.

  • Strengthen timely and appropriate response to disasters and public health emergencies including contingency planning.

  • Strengthen HIV/AIDS-related services and increase coverage.


Activities

  • Provision of PHC including HIV/AIDS through fixed facilities and mobile clinics including services and psycho-social support using more sustainable means.

  • Implement selected, high-impact interventions in reproductive, maternal and child health including basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care, including access to safe and affordable emergency caesarean sections which include PMTCT services.

  • Procure and distribute essential and vital drugs, vaccines, laboratory reagent, health equipment and supplies.

  • Strengthen sector emergency nutrition capacity.

  • Build MoH capacity and ensure appropriate care and psycho-social support of survivors of sexual and GBV.

  • Reinforce MoH, health information surveillance system through strengthening sentinels surveillance, including disaggregation of data by age, sex, and geographic location (urban – rural).

  • Support implementation of disease outbreak response.

  • Mainstream HIV/AIDS and TB in all health interventions and support the continuum of prevention, care, and treatment.

  • Improve vaccination coverage with emphasis on children under five and women of reproductive age.

  • Strengthen community-based health promotion with the implementation of the “Road to Health Strategy”.

  • Support the creation of a water distributor certification system, to ensure community access to water of potable standards.

  • Improve water and sanitation in health care facilities with focus on PHC facilities.

  • Contribute to the improvement of coordination of health activities in partnership with the MSPP.

  • Monitor and assess health coverage gaps for affected population including mobile health facilities, referral networks and fixed health centres.

  • Collaborate and support other clusters, such as Shelter, WASH, and Nutrition, for relocation and ensuring health needs are met in new temporary shelters.

  • Support updating of the health component of the contingency plan, including simulation exercises and mass-casualty management courses.


Indicators and targets

  • Proportion of deliveries assisted by qualified personnel: 30%.

  • Timeliness and completeness of epidemiological reports: 80%.

  • Proportion of epidemic alerts investigated within 72 hours:100%.

  • Proportion of health facilities offering PMTCT services.

  • Proportion of women accessing PMTCT.

  • Vaccination coverage of target population: 90%

  • Proportion of health facilities with a functioning communication and referral system: 60%.

  • Number and percentage of departmental hospitals offering basic and emergency obstetric and neonatal care including caesarean section.

  • Functional Health Cluster producing bi-weekly reports, including list of health partners and health facilities.

  • Response team formed and trained according to responsibilities outlined in health component of National Disaster Plan. Health component of National Disaster Plan updated.


Sectoral monitoring plan

The monitoring action plan will fall under the responsibility of the Health Cluster lead in coordination with the MSPP. The data needed to measure and validate the above mentioned list of outcome indicators will be generated by the various data collection instruments that compose the national health information system. These data will further be completed with cluster partner’s specific statistical information and the final data validation for cluster’s humanitarian achievements on listed objectives (by the means of these indicators) will take place through consensus and cluster peer review exercises.


The indicators proposed have been defined as outcome indicators in order to better track progress and attest achievements on the specific objectives retained by the Health Sector in this CAP. They have been discussed and agreed upon by all partners and will be measured at the end of the period covered by the CAP. As mentioned, most indicators have been selected as outcome indicators, therefore strong and powerful in validity but weaker in sensitivity and ability to attest change over time. In this respect, it must be mentioned that a regular monitoring of these indicators would not be feasible and would not generate any substantial information on how the operation in the aggregate is conducted. Process measures would better do so, but this is part of each project component and falls under the responsibility of each appealing agency which must proceed to regular programme monitoring and implementation checks. The Cluster will organize regular programme implementation sessions to address delays or implementation bottlenecks and act as a referee to take implementation enhancement measures whenever indicated and feasible.
Donors will be informed of the situation as the operation progresses along this CAP through their active participation in the Cluster’s work, through the various Cluster reporting instruments and through the financial and technical reports of each implementing partner due to them.
The cluster coordination will act as a facilitator for dispatching all monitoring and evaluation information associated with this plan in a transparent and timely manner.


Logistics


Cluster Lead Agency

UNITED NATIONS WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME (WFP)

Cluster Participants

AAA, AAR Japan, ACDI/VOCA, ACF, ACPP, ACTED, AA, ADEMA, ADRA, ASA, ACTS World Relief, ADF, ADRA, Adventist Health Int'l Services, AIDG, Airline Ambassadors, Alima, Alpha Omega Psi Feat Inc, America Continental 2000, ARC, ADF, Americas Relief Team, AMI, AMURT, ANPC – Portugal, ARC, Argentinean Embassy, APJ, ASP, AMI, Aust, AVSI, Bangladesh medical team, Begeca / Misereor, Bishop Gontrand Decoste, Bomberos sin fronteras ONGD, BMC, CARE, CAP ANAMUR, Caricom Contingent, Caritas, Casec Lavanneau, CCE, CESVI, CHAPCA, CHF, CAM, Civil Protection Direct. Of Budapest, Clinton Foundation, CHAI, CNP, Colombian Government, Come over Ministries, Compassion International, CW, COOPI, CordAid, Croix Rouge (Americaine, Canadienne, Espagnole, Francaise, Haitienne, Italien), CRS, CVM, Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe, DRI, DPC, Earth Institute, Eglise Catholique Paroisse d'Anse-à-Veau, ESF, Entraide Internationale des scouts de la region de Cluses, EPER, FAO, FRC, FIP, FITTEST, FAU, FND, French Embassy, Fumiapmavidha, Fundacion INICIA, GOAL, Good Neighbours, GRU, GTZ/DIFAEM, GVC, Haiti Union ONG International, GoH; Hand for Help, HI/ AL, Hands on Disaster Response, HELP, HFOI, Hospital Puerto Rico, Humedica International, IFRC, ISF, Intermon Oxfam, ILF, IMC, International Relief and Development, IRC, INTERSOS, InterVol, IOM, IR, J7P HRO, JOIN, JTS, KFHI, Konbit Sante, La Chaîne de l'Espoir, Life Centre, Link Haiti, Mairie de Thomazeau, MDM Canada, MDM France, Medair Haiti, Médicos do Mundo – Portugal, MCC, Mentor Initiative, NCV, NICCO, NPFS / St. Damien's Hospital, NRC, Outreach, OXFAM International / IO-GB, PWJ, PU, PSF, PU, PRODEV, Progressio, PCI, Cruz Roja Mexicana, RedR UK - Bioforce DRSS, SP, SC, SIF, ShelterBox, Solidarités, SOS Children's Villages, SASH, SCCA, Tearfund, The Children's Nutrition Programme, THW Germany, UMCOR, UTPMP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNHCR, UNICEF, United Sikhs, UNOPS, US Flying Physicians, Viva Rio, WASH Cluster, WFP, WHO/PAHO, World Cares Centre, WH, WVI, YMCA (Asociacion Cristiana de Jovenes), ZAM.

Number of Projects

2

Cluster Objectives

To provide support and proactive preparedness planning for and response to the logistics needs of humanitarian actors involved in relief operations in Haiti:

  • enhance coordination, predictability, timeliness and efficiency of the logistics response under the Cluster approach

  • provide common logistics services to support the humanitarian community’s response to fill the identified gaps in the logistics response

  • Support the humanitarian community and Government counterparts through logistics capacity-building activities

  • Support the humanitarian community and nationals authorities by providing logistics inputs for contingency planning for the cyclonic season

Beneficiaries

Humanitarian community in Haiti (107 organizations are currently using Logistics Cluster services in Haiti)

Funds Requested

$24,800,000

Contact Information

Martin Bettelley, martin.bettelley@wfp.org


Needs Analysis

During the Haiti earthquake relief operation, the WFP led Logistics Cluster transported significant quantities of life‑saving relief items by air, road and sea on behalf of the humanitarian community. Though the initial phase of the earthquake response has passed, there is still an identified need for Logistics Cluster services.


The humanitarian community in Haiti still requires the provision of transport to ensure the uninterrupted delivery of relief good throughout Haiti. Many roads still remain impassable, or inaccessible to anything other than all-terrain trucks; which are unavailable through commercial transporters. This is most visible in the up-country areas, where accessibility was a problem even before the January 2010 earthquake. Moreover, there is a sustained need for not only the continued provision of common storage services, but the development of a permanent and reliable storage capacity for the humanitarian community.
In addition, the WFP-led Logistics Cluster has been supporting the humanitarian community with their hurricane preparedness activities and the prepositioning of stocks across the country. Since October 2010, the Logistics Cluster as been heavily involved in providing coordination and support logistics services to organizations responding to the cholera epidemic.
As such, in order to better respond to the needs of the humanitarian community, as well as to ensure the humanitarian community is well prepared for any future emergency, the following two main gaps need to be filled:


  • Lack of adequate fleet of specialised all terrain trucks, which are required to access remote areas. The current WFP/Logistics Cluster Inter‑Agency Fleet is extremely old and unreliable, which makes it difficult to obtain the necessary spare parts and results in high costs of maintenance and high fuel consumption.

  • Lack of adequate and sufficient permanent storage facilities in PaP, but especially outside the capital in Cap‑Haïtien, Gonaïves, Hinche, Les Cayes and Jacmel.


Objectives

1. WFP/Logistics Cluster will continue to provide the following range of common logistics services to all humanitarian actors in country, in order to ensure an unimpeded flow of life‑saving relief items:



  • continue to provide road transport in areas the commercial sector is unable to access due to lack of appropriate vehicles.

  • continue to provide and manage existing common storage facilities.

  • establish and manage additional required logistics storage facilities, especially up country.

  • all cargo stored and transported will be handled as per the priorities set by the HC.

2. Construction of permanent warehouse facilities, which will replace the temporary mobile storage units which are currently being utilized around the country. the new warehouses, which will meet hurricane and seismic proofing standards, will support the storage of food and NFIs requirements in strategic areas (Les Cayes, Jacmel, Gonaïves, Hinche and Cap Haitian) to allow for a rapid and appropriate response to the needs on the ground.


3. Replace the aging WFP/Logistics Cluster Inter‑Agency Fleet of trucks. In the updating of the fleet, care will be taken not to duplicate capacity available from the commercial sector.
4. Enhance coordination, predictability, timeliness and efficiency of the logistics response under the Cluster approach. The activities of the WFP led Logistics Cluster will include:

  • continuation of regular Logistics Cluster coordination meetings.

  • logistics information management, with a devoted Logistics Information Management Officer, as well as a dedicated operations page on the Logistics Cluster website to support operational decision-making.

  • geographic information systems and mapping services to the Humanitarian Community on logistics related matters.

  • continued coordination with military actors present in Haiti.

5. Engage in capacity-building activities with Governmental counterparts to promote ownership within the country.



    • Provide capacity-building activities, including the training of staff for the Centre National de l’Information Géo-Spatiale to facilitate the transfer of some Logistics Cluster Global Information System functions.

    • Engage in logistics-related, local capacity development projects in cooperation with the DPC.

6. Support the humanitarian community and national authorities by providing support to contingency planning for the cyclonic season.


Activities include:

  • logistics contingency planning projects and assessment missions.

  • establishment of prepositioning bases for logistics support (trucks, mobile storage tents, telecom.

  • equipment, and prefab offices.

  • coordination of emergency logistics response measures with UN organizations, NGOs, MINUSTAH and other military actors involved.



Proposed Coverage

Fleet

Trucks to be based in strategic locations, in PaP, Cap-Haïtien, Gonaïves, and Jacmel for a country-wide coverage.

Warehouses

Warehouses to be built in strategic locations, in PaP, Cap Haïtien, Gonaïves, Hinche, Jacmel, Les Cayes for a country-wide coverage.


Expected Outcome

  • Coordinated, predictable, timely and efficient logistics response under the Cluster approach.

  • The uninterrupted delivery of life‑saving relief items to the affected populations, for all humanitarian actors.

  • Improved capability of the humanitarian community to respond and operate throughout Haiti, due to the successful identification and resolution of the logistical gaps.

  • Adequate and sufficient permanent storage facilities available for the humanitarian community.

  • Improved Logistics response capacity, for the humanitarian community, as well as the GoH through the capacity-building of staff and partners.

  • The humanitarian community is better prepared, in terms of the availability of logistics assets and infrastructure, to respond to future emergency.


Sectoral monitoring plan

The Logistics Cluster is an overarching support sector aiming at facilitating the implementation of programmatic activities. As a result, while the monitoring plan to evaluate the project uses multiple measurable indicators, the methodology is reliant on the results of the organizations and clusters supported. Logistics Cluster participants’ feedback will be continuously taken into consideration and the overall strategy adapted to the requirements as required. Monitoring tools include internal and external regular situation reports, training databases and evaluation reports, Haiti emergency response lessons learnt, Logistics Cluster and humanitarian partners’ surveys and Logistics Cluster web portal traffic.


For humanitarian cargo movement and storage tracking, a commodity tracking database will continue to be used to ensure comprehensive data collection, analysis and reporting through the Logistics Cluster.



Objective

Indicators

Data Source

Achieved to date

Target for 2011

1 Provide common logistics services to support the response of the humanitarian community.

1.1 Number of storage facilities made available countrywide.

Logistics Cluster, WFP

3

6

1.2 Number of trucks made available countrywide.

Logistics Cluster, WFP

70

35

1.3 Provision of sea assets.

Logistics Cluster, WFP

1

1

2 Enhance coordination, predictability, timeliness and efficiency of the emergency logistics response under the cluster approach.
(NGO, Government, military actors)

2.1 Number of coordination meeting held.

Logistics Cluster

48




2.2 Number of Information Management products shared and published (maps, sitreps, bulletins, snapshots, facts and figures, dashboard, procedures, meeting minutes).

Logistics Cluster IM and services

170

100

2.3 Number of joint operations conducted to enhance the effectiveness of the humanitarian response (provision of security, escorts, engineering and logistics support).

Logistics Cluster, MINUSTAH

270

200

2.4 Number of Inter-Agency Coordination and Emergency Response meetings attended and facilitated.

Logistics Cluster , MINUSTAH, OCHA

40

40

3 Support the humanitarian community and the Government counterpart to carry out their role by providing operational support equipment and facilities.

3.1 Number of workshops rehabilitated and/or built to support the deployment of the truck fleet operating in Haiti.

Logistics Cluster, WFP

4

2

3.2 Number of office rehabilitated and equipment provided for CNIGS.

Logistics Cluster, CNIGS

0




3.3 Number of trainings facilitated and co-chaired for the DPC.

Logistics Cluster, DPC

0

3

4 Support the humanitarian community and nationals authorities by providing support to contingency planning for the cyclonic season.


4.1 Number of assessment mission conducted in the frame of the contingency planning.

Logistics Cluster, DPC

15

15

4.2 Number of advanced prepositioning bases for logistics support (trucks, mobile storage tents, telecom equipment, prefab offices).

Logistics Cluster, WFP

9

9

4.3 Number of joint simulation emergency exercises attended and co-facilitated.

Logistics Cluster, DPC, MINUSTAH, OCHA

3

3

4.4 Number of storage facilities made available to the humanitarian community for pre positioning needs.

Logistics Cluster, WFP

4

4

Nutrition


Cluster Lead Agency

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF)

Cluster Partners

ACTED, ACDI-VOCA, ACF, ADRA International, AVSI, CARE, Caritas-Haïti, CEPAM, CFM, CMMB, CNP/HSC, CNSA, CNSA/DDASE, CONCERN, CPNANu, CROSE, DDASE, Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe, FHED, FHI, FONDEFH, FSB, FTC, GHESKIO, HAS, HelpAge International, HP, IADBID, IMC, Inter Aide, IA, ITECH, IYCN/CARE, IYCN/PEPFAR, LaC, MDM-France, MDM-Switzerland, MDM-Canada, MEDAIR, MFK, MSF B, MSF-F. MSF-H, MSF-S, MSPP (MoH), PAHO/WHO, WFP, PESADEV, PiH, PSF, PSI, RI, SC, SDSH/MSH, St. Boniface, USAID, USAID/PEPFAR, WC, WFP, WHI, World Bank, WVI

Number of Projects

7

Cluster Objectives

  • Contribute to the reduction of nutrition related morbidity and mortality in children under five, PLW and other vulnerable groups (HIV/AIDS, TB, elderly).

  • Prevent acute malnutrition.

  • Strengthen national capacity for emergency preparedness and response.

Beneficiaries

986,680 children and women, 319,600 children under five and 300,000 PLW, 75,000 moderately malnourished children under five and 48,500 PLW receiving supplementary feeding and 10,000 severely malnourished; 12,000 people with HIV/AIDS, TB and 10,000 elderly.

Funds Requested

$26,665,608

Contact Information

Stefano Fedele, sfedele@unicef.org

Table - Population in need and planned coverage



Category

Affected Population

Beneficiaries

Female

Male

Total

Women

Grls

Boys

Total

IDPs in camps

656,500

643,500

1,300,000

288,846

69,885

68,501

427,232

IDPs outside camps

303,000

297,000

600,000

133,416

32,280

31,640

197,336

Indirectly affected

555,500

544,500

1,100,000

244,818

59,233

58,060

362,112

Totals

1,515,000

1,485,000

3,000,000

667,080

161,398

158,202

986,680


Needs Analysis

The food-insecure population pre-crisis was 1.8 million.24 GAM (SAM+MAM) increased from 5% in 1995 to 7% in 2000 to 9% in 2005-2008.25 In 2008-2009 it was 4.5%.26 Based on a GAM prevalence of 4.5% and SAM prevalence of 0.8%, in the affected population of 6-59m prior to the emergency, there were an estimated 15,967 children with acute malnutrition, of which an estimated 2,839 with SAM and in infants under six months of age, 1,549 have acute malnutrition and 275 have SAM.


The rate of chronic malnutrition (stunting) has been stagnant from 2005-2008 at about 24% of children under five.27 In the same period, prevalence of low birth weight was estimated at 25%, exclusive breastfeeding of infants less than six months old was 24% and the rate of any breastfeeding was 95%. The proportion of children aged between six to nine months receiving complementary feeding was 80%, and although no evidence exists to support this, it is likely that the quality of the diet was, and remains, poor.
Breastfeeding and complementary feeding behaviours in Haiti were disrupted in emergency-affected zones as well as feeding habits of PLW. It is crucial to protect the high rate of any breastfeeding, as community perceptions may have been affected by increased stress post-earthquake and donations of unsolicited breast milk substitutes during the emergency response; at the same time, it is imperative to improve the rate of early and exclusive breastfeeding.
In terms of micronutrient deficiencies, around 60% of children 6-59 months and 46% of women (15-49 years) are anemic (DHS 2005). Among the anemic children, 72% are less than 24 months suffer some form of anemia Vitamin A supplementation coverage was less than the target coverage rate (80%) in all but two departments.28
No nationwide survey was conducted since the earthquake of 12 January 2010. A nutrition survey conducted in three main affected zones indicated that acute malnutrition rates remained stable, thanks to a series of multi-sectoral public health interventions including provision of water, basic sanitation and hygiene and blanket supplementary feeding. However, considering that 1.3 million people are currently still living in camps and many are likely to continue to do so well into 2011, it is estimated that the situation may worsen if the blanket supplementary feeding and micronutrient supplementation are phased down.
Despite the fact that the proportion of acutely malnourished children in affected areas has remained stable over the last few months, active screening activities indicate an increase in the number of children at risk of malnutrition in some settlements of PaP metropolitan area, related to the return of displaced populations from under-served rural areas to urban areas and an increase of food insecurity in the temporary settlement sites.
To address the above issues the Nutrition Cluster’s response plan continues to emphasize the continuation of provision of basic services to the population directly and indirectly affected through a facility and community-based approach. This includes sustained prevention of micronutrient deficiencies, acute and chronic malnutrition and greater community integration of the strategy to improve infant and young child feeding, as well as renewed efforts to support livelihoods, household food security and nutrition education for the most vulnerable groups.
In order to ensure equity, the cluster will advocate for adequate geographical coverage besides coverage of affected areas with high population density, in close collaboration with other clusters/sectors to achieve an inter-sectoral approach and maximize impact. The Nutrition Cluster will focus on all departments with the exception of the North, North-East and North-West. The target area includes an estimated total population of 7,500,000 people. Among these, priority will be given to 1,350,000 displaced people living in camps, 600,000 displaced people living in host communities and 1,050,000 people at high vulnerability due to indirect effect of the emergency.
Objectives

Three main objectives have been identified by the Nutrition Cluster:

1) Improved case management of severe and moderate malnutrition and reduction of malnutrition related mortality and morbidity. This is expected to be achieved through active case finding by community volunteers, provision of services through MSPP’s health facilities covering the needs of communities and camps when possible, and community volunteers follow-up of cases.

2) Reduce micronutrient deficiencies and prevent any deterioration of current levels of acute malnutrition in children U5, PLW and other vulnerable groups, in areas directly and indirectly affected by the emergency. Prevent acute malnutrition, through mass and routine micronutrient supplementation and in targeted areas with known high risks of food and nutrition insecurity, blanket micronutrient supplementation using a lipid based medium for children aged 6-23 months. Prevention will also take place through improvement of Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) practices and outcomes by supporting the scaling-up of PCNB) to ensure that mother/baby pairs have access to a safe place to breastfeed and to receive counselling and support. Mothers will be empowered to take a very active role in the running of the PCNBs with facilitation from the NGOs and in close collaboration and the support of other key community members through the Initiative Communautes Amies des Bebes. In service care and support will be assured at health facilities through the strengthening of the Initiative Hopitaux Amis des Bebes. To further prevent malnutrition in PLW and other vulnerable groups, including people with HIV/AIDS, a range of livelihood, food or cash support packages will be sought to best respond to the specific needs in close collaboration with the agriculture and food clusters.



3) Strengthening of national capacity to respond to the current needs and recurring natural emergencies by supporting the capacity of MSPP in terms of critical staffing at the national and departmental level, rehabilitating some of the MSPP health facilities in order to better integrate in the community the services currently provided from mobile clinics or tents. Monitoring and evaluation capacity of all key stakeholders will also need to be strengthened to ensure effective and efficient programming and better estimation of impact. This will be achieved by ensuring that timely and accurate information is available to monitor nutritional trends, through the routine compilation and analysis of the active screening data, growth monitoring data, and feeding centres database but also through a national nutrition survey. Funding for the survey in the three departments of the North, North-East and North-West which have not been heavily affected by the earthquake will be sought from other funding sources.
Table - Nutrition Cluster objectives, outcomes and outputs

Cluster Objective 1

Improved case management of severe and moderate malnutrition and reduction of malnutrition-related mortality and morbidity.

Outcome 1.1

Coverage of acute malnutrition care of children U5, PLW and other vulnerable groups, in areas directly and indirectly affected by the emergency.

Outputs

1.1.1 - One in-patient facility for severe malnutrition with complications in every hospital with pediatric services in every commune for PaP metropolitan area and two facilities per Department, providing therapeutic feeding to 2,000 children under five in 2011.

1.1.2 - Two out-patient facility for SAM in every section communal for PaP metropolitan area and 1 facility per section communal in the departments, providing therapeutic feeding to 8,000 children under five in 2011.

1.1.3 - Two supplementary feeding facilities for moderate acute malnutrition in every section communal for PaP metropolitan area and 1 facility per section communal in the departments, providing targeted supplementary feeding to 75,000 children under five and 48,500 PLW in 2011.

Outcome 1.2

Mobilization and sensitization of communities facilitated by partners.

Outputs

1.2.1 - Active screening of at least 70% of target groups every three months performed by community health volunteers (CHV) in target areas.

1.2.3 - Follow up by CHV of at least 50% of defaulters being in the community.

1.2.4 - 50% of diarrhoeal diseases treatments taking place in the household with ORS +zinc.

Cluster Objective 2

Reduce micronutrient deficiencies and prevent any deterioration of current levels of acute malnutrition of children under five, pregnant and lactating women and other vulnerable groups, in areas directly and indirectly affected by the emergency.

Outcome 2.1

Prevention and care of micronutrient deficiencies.

Outputs

2.1.1 - Routine supplementation of children with Vitamin A, provision of de-worming tablets and provision of iron-foliate to pregnant women and vitamin A post partum with at least 30% of targeted beneficiaries receiving adequate supplementation.

2.1.1 - Mass supplementation of children with Vitamin A, provision of de-worming tablets every six months and provision of de-worming to pregnant women with at least 90% of targeted beneficiaries receiving adequate supplementation every six months.

2.1.2 - Promotion of exclusive breastfeeding 0-5 m conducted through the PCNB network aiming to increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding from 24% to 40% in targeted areas.

2.1.3 - Promotion of household dietary diversity and in particular of complementary food for children 6-23 months of age to all targeted communities aiming for at least 50% of children 6-23m to receive adequate complementary food in addition to breastfeeding.

2.1.4 - In areas of high vulnerability, distribution of a lipid based micronutrient supplement to at least 70% of children aged 6-23 months.

Outcome 2.2

Improve infant and young child feeding, trough behaviour change and communication and psycho-social support.

Outputs

2.2.1 - Conduct a follow up training of all pediatric services staff, and support re-certification of facilities to strengthen the Initiative Hopitaux Amis des Bebes with follow-up training and cascade to all health facilities.

2.2.2 - Monitoring of the adherence to the International Code of the marketing of breast-milk substitutes in place in al targeted areas.

Outcome 2.3

Supported needs of vulnerable groups like PLW and more specifically people living with HIV/AIDS and TB.

Outputs

2.3.1 - Contribute to the nutrition and food security of 10,000 vulnerable women and their households through support of livelihoods, cash grants or food in close collaborations with the agriculture and food clusters.

2.3.2 - Nutritional support to 12,000 HIV/TB patients and their families (60,000 beneficiaries) in collaboration with the food cluster following the national protocol.

Cluster Objective 3

Strengthening of national capacity to respond to the current needs and recurring natural emergencies.

Outcomes 3.1

Increased national capacity both in terms of human resources, materials and infrastructures, with dedicated positions for nutrition focal points at the national and department levels with adequate monitoring and evaluation, guiding programming strategies and evaluating impact.

Outputs

3.1.1 - Strengthened technical capacity of MSPP health staff trough on-site technical coaching and mentoring on the management of sever and acute malnutrition every 4 months to at least two health staff at every USN, and PTA.

3.1.2 - 75% of nutritional care currently being provided to settlement camps trough mobile clinics or from tents in the camps transferred to a suitable MSPP facility serving the wider community hosting the settlement camps to expand the coverage of essential nutrition services to vulnerable groups and increase equity, following needs identified in collaboration with the health authorities.

3.1.3 - Placement of 4 focal points at the national level with specific responsibility for the technical areas of CMAM, IYCF, Micronutrients and M&E and two in each Department, covering respectively the curative and preventive aspects of the nutrition programme.

3.1.4 - Setting up and maintenance of a database of programmatic data from feeding centres by January 2011 and covering 70% of relevant programmatic data by June 2011.

3.1.5 - Conduct a National Nutrition survey using SMART methodology.

3.1.6 - Develop an emergency nutrition response plan by April 2011.

3.1.6 - Support the establishment of in-patient care for all severely malnourished children with medical complications in all hospital with pediatric services by August 2011.


Table - Sectoral monitoring plan

Cluster Objective 1 - In 2011, Assure at least 70% of coverage of acute malnutrition care of children U5, pregnant and lactating women and other vulnerable groups, in areas directly and indirectly affected by the emergency.

Outcomes

Indicators

Data Source & measure of outcome

1.1 - At least 70% coverage of acute malnutrition care of children under five, PLW and other vulnerable groups, in areas directly and indirectly affected by the emergency.

1.1: Number of severely malnourished children admitted into the appropriate selective feeding centre.

Target: 10,000



Monthly report compiled by health facilities and collated by the national M&E focal point for analysis and dissemination

1.2: Number of moderately malnourished children admitted into the appropriate selective feeding centre.

Target 75,000



Monthly report compiled by health facilities and collated by the national M&E focal point for analysis and dissemination

1.2 - Mobilization and sensitization of communities facilitated by partners.

1.3: Number of children 6-59 months and PLW screened at least every three months

Target: 353,500



Monthly report compiled by health facilities and collated by the national M&E focal point for analysis and dissemination

Percentage of defaulters from selective feeding programmes being followed-up by the community health volunteers in the community.

Target: 50%



Partners monthly report

1.4: Number of children 6-59 months receiving diarrheal treatment with ORS and zinc.

Target: 50%



Partners monthly report

Cluster Objective 2 - In 2011, prevent any deterioration of current levels of acute malnutrition care of children U5, pregnant and lactating women and other vulnerable groups, in areas directly and indirectly affected by the emergency.

Outcomes

Indicators

Data Source and measure of outcome

2.1 - Prevention and care of micronutrient deficiencies.

Percentage of targeted beneficiaries receiving adequate routine supplementation.

Target: 30%



HSI/MESI

Percentage of targeted beneficiaries receiving adequate mass supplementation

Target: 90% of children under five in targeted areas.



Child health day’s implementation reports from campaigns conducted every six months in November and May

Exclusive breastfeeding rate

Target: increased from 24% to 40% in targeted areas



Nutrition survey reports

Percentage of children 6-23m receiving adequate complementary food in addition to breastfeeding

Target: 70%



Nutrition survey reports

Percentage of children aged 6-23m in targeted areas receiving a lipid based micronutrient supplement.

Target: 70%



Partner reports

2.2 – Improve infant and young child feeding, including behaviour change and communication and psycho-social support.

Follow-up training on the Initiative Hopitaux Amis des Bebes conducted for all pediatric services staff, and re-certification of facilities supported.

Partner reports, MSPP reports

Monitoring of the breaches of international code of Marketing of Breast milk Substitutes carried out and number of eventual breaches reported.

Partner reports, MSPP reports

2.3 - Support the needs of vulnerable groups like PLW and more specifically people living with HIV/AIDS and TB.

Definition of vulnerable households agreed.

Number of vulnerable households targeted with

conditional cash transfers and fresh food vouchers to promote food security and micro-credit linked with alternative fuel use and kitchen gardens in collaboration with the agriculture and Food Clusters.


Partner monthly reports

Number of HIV/ TB patients and their families receiving nutritional assistance, provided in collaboration with the Food Cluster.

Partner monthly reports

Cluster Objective 3 - Strengthening of national capacity to respond to the current needs and recurring natural emergencies

Outcome

Indicators

Data Source and measure of outcome

3.1 Strengthening of national capacity to respond to the current needs and recurring natural emergencies.

Number and frequency of health staff at United States navy, physical therapist assistant and PNSs receiving on-site technical coaching and mentoring on the management of SAM.

Partner reports, MSPP reports

Percentage of feeding centres currently being provided trough mobile clinics or from tents in the camps transferred to a suitable MSPP facility serving the wider community hosting the camps.

Target:75% by December 2011



Partner reports, MSPP reports

Number of national focal points and departmental focal points in place.

Target: 4 national focal points and 2 focal points for each department in place by end of January 2011.



Staff being recruited by UNICEF for the period of one year while the positions are included in the national plan and budget for 2012.

Revision of database.

Percentage of coverage of relevant programmatic data of feeding centres and PCNB points to monitor monthly selective feeding canter admissions and performance indicators.

Target: database revised by January 2011, covering at least 70% of relevant programmatic data by June 2011.


Partner reports, MSPP reports

One national nutrition survey using SMART methodology conducted by MSPP.

MSPP reports

National emergency nutrition response plan prepared and adopted by the MSPP to respond to recurring natural and other sudden emergencies target: plan developed by April 2011.

MSPP reports

Number of hospitals having United States navy capacity.

Target all hospitals with pediatric services to have United States navy capacity by August 2011.



Partner reports, MSPP reports


Coordination

Effective coordination of Nutrition Cluster activities is crucial to identify, address and monitor the humanitarian needs. The effectiveness of Nutrition Cluster coordination will be increased through:



      1. timely sharing of Nutrition Cluster activities through the Nutrition Cluster activity map (Who, What, Where).

      2. timely sharing of Nutrition Cluster activities, lessons learned, project evaluations and surveys through Nutrition Cluster coordination fora.

      3. participation to field level coordination meetings held in Léogâne, Jacmel and Gonaïves at least quarterly.

      4. increased coordination with government institutions where possible, to integrate Nutrition Cluster activities with institutional plans, policy and standards.

      5. increased coordination with other sectors e.g. agriculture, WASH, health and CP on assessments, strategies, and results, particularly where activities may overlap with other sectors e.g. contribution to favourable conditions for the return and relocation of affected populations, child health days etc.

      6. joint assessments undertaken by Nutrition Cluster organizations to identify needs and gaps in the provision of service to areas directly or indirectly affected.

      7. effective monitoring of Nutrition Cluster activities is essential to establish a common frame of reference for effective coordination.

The Cluster’s ability to effectively monitor its activities will be achieved through:



  1. the adoption and implementation of Nutrition Cluster monitoring tools and indicators, as a common approach to monitoring project activities and results.

  2. the use of standard beneficiary numbers for Nutrition Cluster systems.

  3. the dissemination of findings from monitoring activities to the Cluste.r

  4. ensure Gender-mainstreaming checklist is actively monitored and reported by the Cluster.

  5. use of nutrition indicators in Nutrition Cluster programmes development and reporting

  6. gender mainstreaming.

Gender mainstreaming is a globally recognized strategy for achieving gender equality. It is a strategy for making women’s and men’s concerns and experiences an integral dimension of the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of Nutrition Cluster programmes, so that women and men benefit equally, and inequality is not perpetuated. To integrate a gender perspective into Nutrition Cluster programmes, organizations will endeavour to:



  1. disaggregate data by sex.

  2. seek gender balanced Nutrition Cluster staff.

  3. analyse gender differences.

  4. design Nutrition Cluster systems to meet needs of all and ensure equal access for women, girls, boys and men.

  5. ensure equal participation of women and men in the design, implementation and evaluation of Nutrition Cluster programmes.

  6. train women and men equally.


Capacity-building of Local NGO and Government Institutions

Capacity-building of Government institutions and communities is inherent in all three Nutrition Cluster strategic objectives; however, Nutrition Cluster organizations must give increased consideration to the capacity-building of partner NGOs. Partner NGOs should be seen as an opportunity to increase humanitarian assistance rather than sub-contractors. Nutrition Cluster organizations will increase the capacity of partner NGOs by:



  1. building the capacity of local NGOs and government institutions with whom there is no agreed formal partnership to implement programmes.

  2. developing the technical skills and knowledge of partner NGOs staff through trainings and secondments.

  3. developing the organizational capacity of partner NGOs through management training, and the provision of assets.


HIV/AIDS

People suffering with HIV/AIDS represent a particularly vulnerable group that requires special attention if their needs are to be addressed in a manner that does not expose them to stigma and further discrimination. As a result of this the Nutrition Cluster will increase awareness on HIV/AIDS and the implementation of programmes that target HIV/AIDS sufferers in a non-discriminatory way.



Protection


Cluster Lead

Sub-cluster Leads

MINUSTAH Human Rights Section of the OHCHR

UNICEF (Child protection); UNFPA (Prevention and Response to GBV)

Cluster Members

CHAP 2011 implementing partners: OHCHR/MINUSTAH, UNHCR, UNICEF, UNFPA

Number of Projects

  • 30 (including projects for the sub-clusters on CP and Prevention and Response to GBV)

Cluster Objectives

  • Identify security concerns with implications for Human Rights and protection, with particular attention to SGBV, CP, forced evictions and access to minimum services and support the response of relevant actors. CP: See separate Sub-Cluster Response Plan.

  • Ensure non-discrimination of vulnerable groups and attention to their specific needs in the delivery of protection and assistance, with particular focus on people with disabilities, the elderly, children, women at risk and people with chronic illnesses.

  • Promote respect for dignity and human rights in the process of return/reintegration, relocation and local integration

  • Support the Haitian Government in meeting its human rights/protection obligations on issues such as evictions, documentation.

  • Strengthen the capacity of communities and civil society organizations to respond to protection challenges both in PaP and the regions.

  • Mainstream human rights and protection in all areas of intervention.

Beneficiaries

Three million people. Primary beneficiaries are IDPs in settlements and host families, separated children, survivors of GBV and people with special needs (e.g. people living with disabilities and older people). Secondary beneficiaries: the wider Haitian population that will benefit from a rights-based implementation of the reconstruction process and strengthening of the rule of law and equitable durable solutions.

Funds Requested

$60,751,529

Contact Information

Ben MAJEKODUNMI majekodunmi-minustah@un.org+ 509 37477448


Table: Number of affected population and beneficiaries

Category

Affected Population

Beneficiaries

IDPs in camps

1.5 million

1.5 million

IDPs outside camps

7.0 million

7.0 million

Indirectly affected

8.5 million

8.5 million



Response to date

Although achievements inevitably overlap with each other, a break down has been provided here to help quickly highlight those areas where progress has been made.


Examples of action directly by the Cluster

  1. implementation of a Protection Cluster recommendation (made under the Joint Security Assessment) to design and launch an IDP Camp Strategic Policing Plan with combined Haitian national police (HNP) and MINUSTAH conducting much increased night patrols in camps and on foot, pursuant to requests from IDPs themselves, especially women.

  2. individual responses to protection concerns identified during monitoring of IDP camps, including: individual responses to as many cases of forced closure of IDP camps as possible (on site visits, meetings with camp committee members, meeting with local authorities and mediation toward an appropriate solution); deployment of Haitian Police and United Nations Police (UNPOL) on site to reduce security risks; individual response to reports of GBV emblematic cases (meetings with survivors, referral to entities that can provide assistance, liaison with police authorities for investigative follow-up, support regarding future protection); reports of killings or beatings (on site visits, visits to morgue and hospitals, investigation of circumstances of the violence, request for appropriate police and judicial action).

  3. regular and ongoing interventions with national authorities and humanitarian actors on the overall response to protection issues (for example, forced camp closures, relocations of IDPs, security issues, GBV cases and CP concerns).

  4. functioning of six regional protection clusters.

  5. support to HNP on SGBV emblematic cases to ensure investigations are conducted in a sensitive approach.

  6. six ongoing trainings for camp managers on protection and legal process for evictions.

  7. appointment of a human rights/ protection focal point working with UNPOL/HNP on SGBV and other violence.

  8. establishment of a working group on documentation to identify core issues, finalization of a paper proposing solutions and distribution of posters in camps to inform populations on procedure to retrieve/obtain documentation.

  9. policy proposal drafted on a model on return and relocation with protection concerned mainstreamed

  10. design and coordination of two Joint Security Assessments (March and May 2010), follow up of recommendations including strategic policing plan to prevent SGBV

  11. quick-impact projects implemented in consultation


Monitoring to identify general protection gaps, individual cases requiring action, and as a preventive measure:

  • joint security assessment on the protection of IDPs in camps (completed March 2010) conducted by “joint” teams led by the Protection Cluster and bringing together a combination of humanitarian actors (including UNICEF and UNFPA), MINUSTAH (including analytical team members UNPOL, UN military), Haitian Police, with a particular emphasis on ensuring presence on women team members.

  • protection assessment of IDPs in host communities (completed May 2010).

  • ongoing monitoring of IDP camps, including through visits by Cluster members to specific camps, reviews by the Cluster lead of reports from humanitarian organizations, MINUSTAH civilian sections (such as Civil Affairs and Community Violence Reduction, JOTC) and UNPOL, and individual responses to protection concerns (see below)

  • ongoing monitoring of forced returns of Haitians back to Haiti and interventions made to uphold the rights of all involved.

  • identification of some partners working on providing legal services to affected population.


Proposals and guidance to the State, UN and wider international community on policies to meet international standards

  • Establishment of a Working Group on Housing Law Property and finalization of a paper identifying core issues and key solutions, which has served as an advocacy tool towards the UN and government to ensure adequate response.

  • Protection principles are taken in consideration in the UN’s IDP strategy, and in relocation and evacuation procedures.

  • Protection guidance and SOPs on humanitarian evacuations drafted for inclusion in possible humanitarian evacuations of IDPs from camps at risk of flooding.

  • Proposal submitted to the Government (March 2007) on a State policy on the governance of IDP camps and on the relocation of IDPs that would meet international human rights and protection standards.

  • Proposal submitted to the Government for a State policy that would meet international human rights and protection standards in the context of increasing efforts to close IDP camps.

  • SOPs on GBV referral and reporting systems are in place.

  • Training and sensitization on GBV conducted.

  • PEPS kits distributed to 40 institutions.

  • Working Groups on Communications and Referrals continue to meet.

  • Approximately 30,000 referral cards are being distributed in French and Kreyol.

  • Action sheets on GBV integration for clusters are available in French, English and Kreyol .

  • April-December 2010 GBV Strategy and Action Plan prepared in line with the National Plan to end volence Against Women, is nearing completion.

  • training on IDP protection to over 200 human rights monitors, camp managers and national authorities – Haitian National Police, DPC, etc.)

  • proposals to national authorities (for example, the OPC) and to national NGOs on strengthening public policy at local and national levels in the context of the National Plan of Action on the reconstruction process, toward ensuring the inclusion of human rights and protection perspectives in all public policy and ensuring transparency and efficiency in implementation.


Key challenges and constraints

The Protection Cluster has faced major challenges and constraints. Progress over the past three months has allowed some of these to be partially overcome, while others remain significant.
The definition or articulation of “protection” and its consequences

In many humanitarian situations “protection” is articulated in a holistic manner that extends from access to services to protection from physical harm on behalf of “affected” populations. This definition essentially covers the entirety of an affected population and covers, to some degree, all aspects of the assistance to an affected population, including inevitably all the assistance (shelter, WASH, etc) provided by other clusters. Projects and activities initially submitted to the Protection Cluster for the 2010 CAP included projects focusing on assistance as diverse as Community Information Centres, psycho-social assistance, provision of PEP kits to victims of GBV, legal advice, provision of comprehensive pediatric amputee support, and concerns with the HNP follow-up on rape cases. With such a broad definition of “protection” it becomes very challenging for the Cluster to develop a coherent and targeted focus on specific issues of concern. The membership of the Cluster reflects the diversity of the projects. While this diversity brings together a rich panorama of experience, the expertise is so diverse that there is insufficient density on any given subject to allow the Cluster to deploy as a cluster of organizations to target a particular concern. The broad definition of protection also leads to a high degree of overlap with other clusters. A high turn-over of staff during 2010 has slowed to a more manageable level, with longer-term staff increasing in place, including staff who almost all speak French.
Affected” population

Affected populations” are traditionally those affected by the humanitarian situation. In Haiti, however, the term is a complex one. At its most basic, an “affected” population is a population that as been left homeless by the earthquake and is now living in an IDP camp or in host communities in province and border regions with the Dominican Republic. However, many of those left homeless were living in concrete houses with more than one floor, were middle class and in a better financial situation than non-affected populations living close by in slums where earthquake destruction was less, because structures were made from wood and corrugated iron. In the PaP urban environment, it quickly becomes nonsensical to conduct protection work only with classic “affected” populations and not with other populations. GBV incidents, for example, do not recognize IDP camp boundaries but occur throughout certain areas of the capital city. Weaknesses in the State response to GBV crimes are not limited to GBV crimes committed against IDPs but instead affect all survivors of GBV. This contrasts with “Shelter” for example, which can fairly and appropriately be focused on people who lack shelter because of the earthquake. Thus, while the definition of “protection” (above) is exceptionally broad, the definition of populations requiring protection frequently extends to large swathes of the entire population of Haiti located in PaP but also in the province and border regions, and post-earthquake protection problems are intricately linked to long-standing problems such as the weakness of the judiciary and the penal system, under-development and poverty.


A major challenge in 2010 was to re-articulate protection in a manner that minimized duplication with other clusters, that was coherent given the situation of both earthquake and non-earthquake-affected populations, and that responded to specific protection priorities. The Protection Cluster lead, during late February, March and April 2010, worked with cluster members to agree on a more refined version of the Cluster’s ToRs and strategy, which was adopted by consensus in April. The new ToRs and strategy helped significantly in focusing the discussions and the work of the Cluster although the more human rights focused approach revealed that only a limited number of organizations within the cluster brought this particular type of expertise, with the result that discussions and implementation are led by a very small number of cluster members.
The articulation of protection will remain a key issue for the 2011 CHAP. In October 2010, the representative of the Secretary-General on the human rights of IDPs called for a shift in the focus of humanitarian operations stating specifically “People in the camps have specific needs, especially relating to shelter, which need to be addressed at the camp level. However, other urgent needs such as access to health and water services and to education are faced not only by camp populations but also by Haiti’s poor, and should be addressed through a neighbourhood approach”. Protection in Haiti must follow a similar trajectory and, within the limits of a humanitarian framework, address elements of State rule of law capacity and community-based protection that will protect both camp inhabitants and wider communities in PaP, in province and border regions with The Dominican Republic.
Political context

Elections beginning in late November 2010, and which may continue to a second tour in February 2011 create both opportunities and challenges. A new Government will need time to settle into its role and establish relationships with humanitarian partners. The humanitarian situation, however, requires urgent and sustained action consistent across both the outgoing and incoming governments.
Participation in the Cluster

The Cluster lead maintains very regular bilateral contacts with relevant authorities, including at ministerial levels. However, State authorities participate only very occasionally in Protection Cluster meetings and have informally indicated their lack of enthusiasm for the Cluster process, preferring to engage with organizations bilaterally or through an alternative State structure. The Cluster functioned for three months in early 2010 in both English and French. However, to increase meeting efficiency and encourage greater national participation, the lead chose to use French only as of early May, and to encourage side-simultaneous French-English interpretation for those who required it. Numbers of participants in the Cluster fell in February, but rose significantly through March and April to an average of about 50 people, representing 42 organizations per meeting. The numbers remained consistent through most of 2010.
Needs Analysis

Prior to 12 January, Haiti was marked by: deep poverty and under-development; up to 80% unemployment; inadequate to acceptable and affordable food, housing, education, and healthcare; weak rule of law institutions; impunity; rights violations in the context of the judicial process including in the context of arbitrary arrest and detention, ill-treatment during detention, long periods of pre-trial detention, prison overcrowding and abuse of authority; gender-based violence, trafficking for sexual and other economic exploitation, and domestic service. Most basic services were run by private actors.


The earthquake has compounded these pre-existing problems. State protection institutions such as the Département de la Protection Civile, the justice system and the OPC suffered serious damage: prisons, courts and police stations have collapsed for example, leading to even greater overcrowding in detention facilities and police and OPC personnel were killed.
In the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, there was an urgent need to assess protection gaps in the light of the humanitarian situation, new priorities and vulnerable groups, and the capacity of State’s protection infrastructure in PaP, provinces and border regions with the Dominican Republic, while also taking into consideration pre-existing human rights and protection problems. Four months on, a series of points can be identified which trace a pattern of the needs within which protection objectives and strategies must now be defined:


  • An estimated 1.3 million IDPs (according to Government figures), most of whom are in camps whereas a important number is located in host communities in province and border regions (an estimated 160,000 IDPs along the border with the Dominican Republic), require protection in the context of their temporary presence in camps and host communities and long-term move to permanent housing (either a return home or a new option such as local integration). The short-term protection of IDPs and the provision of durable solutions are a core protection responsibility

  • Many people from the urban poor have moved into IDP camps, and many people are maintaining a presence both in IDP camps and in a home, emphasizing the impossibility, and perhaps the futility of trying to distinguish completely between IDP populations and other populations, given that in some situations IDPs are in a better humanitarian and economic situation than non-IDPs.

-the protection of IDPs must go hand in hand with the socio-economic and at times physical protection of other vulnerable people

  • The Haiti reconstruction process, and the associated pledges of assistance from the international community, the initial post disaster needs assessment and the subsequent National Plan of Action offer an opportunity for protection to be inserted throughout State and donor action in Haiti, and including toward achieving durable solutions. Creating opportunities to include protection within the process, in an effective and lasting manner is complex but essential

  • Efforts to move camps out of private land before alternatives are available, security in camps and in surrounding neighbourhoods and the prevention of GBV, identification papers, land tenure issues, the rights of people with disabilities, employment and the reopening of schools and other education establishments, the impact of rain on existing IDP camps, the impact of the situation at the border regions with the Dominican Republic with the increase of human trafficking and Government efforts to end food and water distribution as a means of reducing camp populations and stimulating the economy, have all emerged as issues with key protection aspects. In the latter half of 2010, the role and responsibility of the State in leading on key issues requiring State action – such as evictions and a return and resettlement Plan – became fundamental.


Objectives

The objectives listed below reflect a narrowing in the range of issues examined by the Protection Cluster, but also a widening to focus increasingly on protection though community-based structures rather than camp-based activities.


1) Identify security concerns with implications for Human Rights and protection, with particular attention to SGBV, CP, forced evictions and access to minimum services and support the response of relevant actors.

2) Ensure non-discrimination of vulnerable groups and attention to their specific needs in the delivery of protection and assistance, with particular focus on people with disabilities, the elderly, children, women at risk and people with chronic illnesses. CP and SGBV-related actions will be primarily pursued under separate Response Plans for each sector.

3) Promote respect for dignity and human rights in the process of return/reintegration, relocation and local integration including issues of civil registration and documentation.

4) Support the Haitian government in meeting its human rights/protection obligations on issues such as evictions, documentation.

5) Strengthen the capacity of communities and civil society organizations to respond to protection challenges both in PaP and the regions.
Cluster monitoring plan

Strategic objectives

Activities

Outputs

Indicators

  1. Identify security concerns with implications for human rights and protection - with particular attention to SGBV, CP, forced evictions and access to minimum services - and support the response of relevant actors.

Support to National Police

(HNP/UNPOL) on patrolling activities.



  • Training on SGBV.

  • Implementation of walking patrol in the IDPs camps.

  • Implementation of motorized patrol in host communities.

  • Daily contacts between the Police and beneficiaries.

  • Monitoring and recording of all data of the police.

Number of training and participants.

Percentage of participants with increase knowledge of SGBV.

% camps population reached by HNP.


Support to judicial system actions in conformity with law and practices.

  • Support to national police (HNP) for case works in particular in SGBV and violence against children and people with disabilities (follow up of individual cases, training and counselling on HR bases approach).

Number of cases identified.

Number of investigation fully conducted.



Protection monitoring and reporting.

  • Strengthen of referral system in case of human rights violations.



Percentage of camp visits and frequency.

Number of camp visits with follow up.

Number of cases followed up.


Communication to communities on available services, with particular attention to vulnerable people.

  • Information campaigns through media, outreach activities, etc.

Number of people reached.

Number of media tools used.



SGBV

  • Please see below in separate table




CP

  • Please see below in separate table




  1. Ensure non-discrimination of vulnerable groups and attention to their specific needs in the delivery of protection and assistance - with particular focus on people with disabilities, the elderly, children, women at risk and people with chronic illnesses.

Support by the Protection Cluster to other clusters.

  • Systemic approach by Protection cluster to other cluster in order to spread protection guidelines in other clusters activities (sharing information and trainings).

  • Deploy protection staff to support the other clusters in strengthening their protection approach.

Number of guidance papers shared with other clusters.

Number of people trained.

Number of staff deployed.


Thematic capacity-building on vulnerabilities.

  • Government.

  • local and international NGOs

  • cluster systems

Number of people trained.

Number of organizations including vulnerability criteria in their programming.



Awareness raising on vulnerabilities.

  • Awareness raising.

  • Design and implementation of media communication strategy.

Number of awareness raising campaigns.

Monitoring and reporting.

  • Qualitative mapping of vulnerabilities.

  • Assessment/evaluations of services provided to vulnerable groups.

Vulnerability assessment carried out in PaP area and provinces with a particular focus in border regions to the Dominican Republic.

Assistance to vulnerable groups in IDP camps and in host communities in PaP, province and border regions.

  • Support and protection projects for women at risk, people with disabilities, children and adolescents at risk and elderly people.

  • Support and protection projects to respond to human trafficking and exploitation of women and children in border regions.

Number of protection projects undertaken and number of beneficiaries per categories and per area of operation.




Strategic objectives

Activities

Outputs

Indicators

  1. Promote respect for dignity and Human Rights in the process of return/reintegration, relocation and local integration.

Monitoring and reporting of return and relocation movements.

  • Monitoring and reporting of return and relocation movements.

Comprehensive survey of trends

% of organized relocation/return movement monitored.



Providing guidance and training on minimum standards and best practices on return and reintegration.

  • Distribution of a guide book of the returnees.

  • Information campaign via radio, newspaper and community mobilizes.

  • Training for communities with focus on specific vulnerable groups such as disabled people and women at risk.

Number of return packages delivered.

Number of training conducted and number of beneficiaries.



Support consultations with IDPs on their durable solutions options.

  • Intention surveys, participatory assessment/focus groups (age, gender and diversity mainstreaming) conducted in IDP camps and in host communities in PaP and regions outside of PaP (particular focus on Gonaïves and border regions with The Dominican Republic).

Number of individuals interviewed.

Number of participatory surveys conducted including host communities.



Identify and strengthen existing protection structures.

  • Community structures including civil societies.

Number of community leaders identified.

Number and diversity of trainings.



Support and assistance to local integration of displaced people in PaP, province and border regions with the Dominican Republic-

  • Strengthen host communities structures to receive and integrate locally IDPs in PaP, provinces and border regions (increase and improvement of local transitory capacities, specific support to education and health facilities including CP services.

  • Advocacy for the implementation of national mechanisms to support local integration (i.e. policy on territory presence and deployment of national Police, of social services etc...) in and outside PaP.

Number of existing structures supported

% of relocation sites with minimum services.

Number of beneficiaries.

Number of area of operation (Percentage of territory covered).



Promotion of protection approach during reintegration and return process (i.e. “Returnees kits”).

  • Ensure in collaboration with other cluster that returnees kits are implemented with a protection background.

  • Ensure that protection guidelines are widespread shared amongst clusters members for returnees and reintegration operation.

Protection concerns reflected in activities and projects of other clusters.

Number of organization implemented a protection-based approach during returnees and reintegration operation.



Promotion of legal clinics.

  • Implement legal clinics to support legal issues (such as documentation or financial bargains) in PAP and also in province and remote area such as border regions.

Number of operational legal clinics.

Number of legal clinics covering remote areas

Number of beneficiaries.


  1. Support the Haitian State authorities in meeting the State’s human rights and protection obligations, including on documentation and secondary forced displacement (evictions).

Advocacy and support on access to documentation.

  • Example of essential documentation missing: birth certificate, marriage documents, passport, identity cards etc.

  • Example of constraints to access to documentation: lack of information about procedures, bureaucratic constraints, cost and delay of procedure, low rate of alphabetization of Haitian population, state structures damaged and difficulties to access to.

  • Support to Government to improve its capacities to deliver in timely and efficient manners missing documentation for people of concern.

Number of people having retrieved documentation.

Number of documentation delivered and type of documentation.

Number of state structures supported-

% of territory with documentation based activities undertaken (focus on remote and border regions).



Advocacy and support to the Government in addressing secondary forced displacement (eviction).

  • Elaboration and implementation of SOPs for identification, referral and reporting.

  • Database management.

  • Mediation and facilitation.

  • Support and assistance in case of secondary forced displacement to vulnerable people such as women at risk (pregnant women, women single head of household), people with disabilities, child/adolescent at risk and elderly people.

% of camps with eviction cases addressed.

Numbers of vulnerable people assisted.



Advocacy and support regarding application of human rights standards in the context of design and implementation of durable solutions.

  • Identification of potential human rights and protection concerns in the context of durable solutions.

  • Advocacy toward the ideal implementation of durable solutions.

Number of instances at which the Cluster has provided advocacy and recommendations.

Advocacy and support regarding the response of national judicial authorities to violence committed against IDPs and other vulnerable people.

  • Monitoring of incidents.

  • Identification and follow up on the State response to emblematic cases.

  • Advocacy regarding the quality of follow-up.

Number of cases on which the Cluster has provided advocacy and recommended solutions.

Support linkages between the work of the Office de la Protectrice du Citoyen and the Protection Cluster.

  • Create opportunities for the OPC to work with the Protection Cluster.

  • Share Protection Cluster analyses of concerns and recommended solutions..

Number of Protection Cluster documents shared with the OPC.

Number of meetings between the OPC and the Cluster.






Strategic objectives

Activities

Outputs

Indicators

  1. Strengthen the capacity of communities and civil society organizations to respond to protection challenges in PaP, province and border regions with the Dominican Republic

Integration of protection into the work of civil society organizations.

  • n/a

Number of meetings held in governmental institutions.

Number of civil society organizations participating in the Cluster.



Capacity-building in French and Creole.

  • community leaders

  • camp committees

  • civil society

Number of people trained.

Number of camp committees trained.

Number of organizations trained.


Implementation of Quick Impact Project (QIP)s.

  • Including communities hosting IDPs in PaP, regions outside PaP including the border area with the Dominican Republic.

  • Special focus on QIPs for vulnerable people such as women at risk, person with disabilities, child at risk and elderly people.

  • Protection QIPs to strengthen civil societies in border regions to respond to Human trafficking and exploitation of women and children.

Number of QIPs implemented.

Number of direct and indirect beneficiaries and area of operation (percentage of territory covered by QIPs implementation).



Promotion of dialogue between IDPs and host communities in PaP and province.

  • Promotion and support to local and participatory exchange between communities.

  • Promotion and support to dialogue between IDPs, host communities and local authorities.

Number of local activities undertaken to strengthen links between IDPs, host communities and local authorities and percentage of territory covered.

  1. Support the Cluster system to integrate protection and human rights

Sensitization about sexual exploitation by humanitarian actors.

  • code of conduct

  • training for UNPOL

Number of training and beneficiaries.

Number of code of conduct distributed and number of organization involved.



Sensitization on concerns of human trafficking.

  • Training on Human trafficking.

  • Frequent information sharing about human trafficking with Haiti and the Dominican Republic (border regions).

Number of trainings and organization participating.



Table of proposed coverage per site

Regions

Organizations

Port-au-Prince/Ouest

Department



OHCHR/MINUSTAH, UNICEF, UNFPA, AVSI, UNHCR, Heartland, IMC, IOM, Project K.I.D, CESVI, IAHV, IMS, HI, UNIFEM, Plan, SC, IRC, ADRA-Haiti, Mercy Corps, ARC, UNDP, Internews, PESADEV, USCRI, CECOSIDA, WCC, EMDH, Terre Des Hommes, UNAIDS, CISP, Mercy Corps, World YWCA, ILO

Léogâne area

OHCHR/MINUSTAH

Petit Goâve/Grand Goâve




Jacmel/South Dept

OHCHR/MINUSTAH

Gonaïves/Artibonite

OHCHR/MINUSTAH

Cap Haïtien

OHCHR/MINUSTAH

Centre

OHCHR/MINUSTAH

Les Cayes/South Dept.

OHCHR/MINUSTAH

Jeremie/Grand-Anse

OHCHR/MINUSTAH

Border areas

OHCHR/MINUSTAH (Quanaminthe), UNHCR (Jimani-Fond Parisien; Ouanaminthe-Dajabon)

Dominican Republic

UNHCR, UNFPA, UNICEF


Protection Sub-Cluster: Child Protection


Sub-cluster Leads

UNICEF/MAST

Cluster Members

MAST (GoH), ADRA, AMI, ARC , American Red Cross, ASR, ARC, AVSI, CAD, CW, CRS, CECOSIDA, CESVI-Haiti, CISP, CISP, COHAN, , CRC, FRC, Haiti Red Cross, FHI, Fondation Dorcely, Foundation Juvens, FH, Giare, HRC,HI, HA, Holt Fontana, Hope Worldwide, HI, IDEJEN, IEDA Relief, IMC, IRC, IOM , JCICS, MAEC, MERCY Corps, MINUSTAH, NCA, PIN, Plan International, Project KID, REDEE, RI, RSE , SC, SIF, SOS Canada, Tearfund, Terre des hommes, UNICEF, Union des femmes pour le développement, USAID, War Child Canada, WC, WHI, WV

Cluster Objectives

Ensure the protection of 1.4 million vulnerable children affected by the earthquake, both in areas directly affected (PaP, Petit Goâve and Jacmel) and those affected by displacement or other secondary effects by:

  1. preventing and responding to separated and unaccompanied children

  2. strengthening Government, civil society and local authorities’ skills and capacity to respond to CP needs

  3. promoting community-based mechanisms that provide psycho-social support and protect children from risks of increased exposure to violence, trafficking, abuse, neglect and exploitation

Beneficiaries

1.4 million children affected by the earthquake (direct and indirect) and in particular 500,000 vulnerable children through the provision of a range of CP services.

Contact Information

Jorge Vallès, jvalles@unicef.org


Detailed beneficiary breakdown of “affected children”

Category

Affected Children Beneficiaries

Female

Male

Total

IDPs

285,000

285,000

570,000

Host communities

415,000

415,000

830,000

Totals

700,000

700,000

1,400,000


Needs Analysis

On the eve of 12 January children in Haiti were already facing tremendous threats of violence, sexual abuse, trafficking, exploitation and abandonment.



  • Up to 173,000 children were reportedly exploited as domestic workers.

  • 50,000 children were separated from their families in institutions.

  • Up to 4,000 children were living on the streets.

  • At least 2,000 children were trafficked annually through and to the Dominican Republic.

Those risks have increased manifold as the earthquake exacerbated a pre-existent vulnerability and brought multi-dimensional protection risks for hundreds of thousands of children in Haiti. Nine months in, and with 1.3 million people homeless in camps, security and finding sustainable solutions for return are of utmost priority, along with strengthening community responses. The security situation in Haiti IDP camps and towns remains precarious for the most vulnerable, especially for children and women. The current estimation of IDPs stands at 1,300,000 located in the capital, PaP, and in lesser extent in Léogâne, Jacmel and Petit-Goâve.


NGO, inter-agency and UNICEF missions have continuously assessed the situation of IDPs in PaP and in the most affected areas of the country. One main conclusion has been that their needs are far to be fully addressed. IDP children and women in Haiti face a serious protection crisis caused by violence, abuse and exploitation. They do not feel safe in the areas where they are displaced or at home.
GBV affecting the most vulnerable sectors of the population has been identified as a problem area, together with the sexual exploitation of children, mainly girls, and separated, abandoned and unaccompanied children. Child trafficking continues as an issue of major concern that has been exacerbated by the consequences of the earthquake catastrophe.
A primary risk facing children immediately after the earthquake was separation from family care. The already weak systems in place to protect children have been further depleted by the loss of social work personnel, logistics and office space of the (Ministère des Affaires Sociales et du Travail (Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour, MAST) and IBESR. While some children found temporary care with families and institutions that are protective, many others are still at risk of trafficking, abuse and exploitation. In addition, children currently with families living in extreme poverty exacerbated by the consequences of the disaster are more vulnerable to abandonment, raising the risk of a second phase of separation and increased vulnerability to sexual abuse and violence. As a matter of a fact, the practice of children being separated from their families, either to be placed in institutional residential care within ‘orphanages’ and crêches, or to serve as restavec,29 is believed to have increased since the earthquake, especially in rural areas.
Reports of sexual violence are increasing from the spontaneous settlement areas in PaP and across the country. Reports of trafficking and illegal international adoption of minors have dominated the international press in recent months. The practice of children being separated from their families, either to be placed in institutional residential care within ‘orphanages’ and crêches, or to serve as restavec, is believed to have increased since the earthquake, especially in rural areas.
The earthquake also exacerbated the trend of illegal and premature adoption and trafficking of children due to the inadequate legal framework and institutional structure to prevent and detect these phenomena. There are also reports of higher threats of adolescents and youth involvement in gang activity, urban armed violence and other risky behaviour such as substance abuse. At the same time, more than 4,000 street children are currently living in PaP metropolitan area. These are particularly at risk of being abused and exploited, and used and enrolled by gangs.
Today more international NGOs are providing services for children in Haiti since the earthquake and some local NGOs have changed their mandate to meet children’s protection needs – but these remain huge and much remains to be done for the fulfilment of children’s rights in Haiti. Developing local capacity is critical to ensure that local NGOs have the means to respond to CP concerns. Needs assessment, mapping, technical support and working in partnership for leveraging expertise and resources is a key aspect of strong CP strategy. These efforts to build a protective environment are being done in partnership between Government counterparts and civil society. This includes training for both government and NGO case workers, but also reinforcing referral mechanisms, social work systems, and CP committees.
Continued work is needed to ensure that effective patrols occur in camps and that proper follow up is provided to victims by bridging the gap between humanitarian actors and armed authorities to enhance information flow and provide follow up to cases involving young women and children. Referral mechanisms need to be strengthened, as well as advocacy to ensure camp managers/committees are involved in monitoring patrols and trained on CP standards.
While patrols are necessary, strengthening the community response remains a priority, both in establishing CP committees, with proper monitoring and support, and working with parents and caregivers of children. Child and youth consultations are also fundamental element in this response, and in gaining legitimacy and efficacy for future strategy and direction for policy related to CP. As part of the “neighbourhood” approach to returns, CP assessment and services need to be mapped out and integrated in the over-all approach.
Regarding the ongoing cholera outbreak, children in temporary settlement sites and residential care facilities are at particular risk due to overcrowding and/or communal living conditions. In both settings, sleeping areas, water schemes, sanitation facilities and cooking areas are shared. Many children have lost primary care-givers, thereby elevating their risk of exposure to violence, abuse and exploitation. Community-based CP mechanisms must be supported.
Objectives

The CP partners individually and its Cluster collectively address the specific protection needs of and threats to children in the immediate phase, particularly those concerning:



  • separated and unaccompanied children, with particular attention to the youngest

  • children vulnerable to violence, abuse and exploitation, including GBV and sexual exploitation of children

  • children at risk of being trafficked or recruited by gangs

The CP Sub-cluster, leaded by UNICEF and the MAST, will facilitate coordination in the implementation of programmes providing protection to an estimated 500,000 extremely vulnerable and displaced children and young women affected by the earthquake in Haiti. It will continue to coordinate activities that prevent and respond to psycho-social distress and violence, abuse, exploitation, discrimination and neglect of the most affected children — both in areas directly affected and those affected by displacement or other secondary effects — by strengthening and improving the national CP system and through CP humanitarian response.


The current situation is one of pivotal opportunity to scale up both the GoH’s as well as community-based CP systems. Key priorities include the establishment of CP committees, and strengthening national response by reinforcing the links between IBESR and BPM notably in the camps. Similarly the work for and with adolescents and youth at risk must be harnessed
The work of the CP Sub-cluster should be developed to scale. There are less CP actors outside of PaP, and both local and international NGOs are in need of further support on co-ordination and technical expertise. Similarly Sectoral Working Groups on CP are to be continued the national level, with plans for such Sectoral Working Groups also at the Departmental level. Cluster activities focus on the emergency/humanitarian response, whereas the Sectoral Working Group would facilitate broader discussions.
The specific objectives for 2011 are to:

  1. prevent and respond to separated and unaccompanied children

  2. strengthen Government, civil society and local authorities’ skills and capacity to respond to CP needs in order to create a protective environment for children

  3. ensure emergency-affected children have access to community-based mechanisms that provide psycho-social support and protect them from risks of increased exposure to violence, trafficking, abuse, neglect and exploitation

Regarding the cholera outbreak/epidemic response, two urgent categories of action are foreseen by CP agencies:



    1. outreach to vulnerable groups: in partnership with child protection partner networks including those managing CFS, residential child care centres and the Interagency Network for Separated Children have been activated to conduct awareness raising and support to affected children and children at risk.

    2. Technical assistance/sustained support: child protection agencies will continue to support MAST, including IBERS and implementing partners with technical assistance to ensure the proper health and hygiene messages are transmitted through appropriate networks and residential care facilities and that vulnerable children are identified, registered, referred and/or cared for through partners.

    3. all these activities will be closely coordinated with and in support to the relevant sectors and national authorities in the implementation of the cholera outbreak/epidemic response and its set of comprehensive preventive measures, namely Health and WASH Clusters


Sectoral monitoring plan

Individual agencies and organizations will monitor project-specific indicators, disaggregated by sex and age and will conduct regular evaluations and assessments of their project objectives. The CP Cluster will provide technical support and guidance to organizations to promote effectiveness and harmonization of monitoring approaches among partners.


The Cluster will regularly monitor the overall performance of the sector by tracking progress of cluster partner’s activities through bimonthly activity reports.
The Cluster lead will also be responsible for tracking the implementation of the CP Sub-Cluster Annual Work Plan agreed by the cluster members in September 2010.
Table of proposed coverage per site

SITE / AREA

ORGANIZATIONS




Cap Haïtien

Plan International, World Vision




Carrefour

OJFA, Ami, ADRA, ODEMAH, Heartland Alliance (HA), Parole-Action, ARC, Pan-American Development Foundation (PADF), Consortium for Reinforcement of Christian Education (CRECH), Joint Council on International Children’s Services (JCICS)




Cayes-Jacmel

Plan International (PI), BB, Save the Children




Choscal Cité soleil

HCR, PADF, Food for the Hungry, MDM Canada




Cornillon/Grd bois

OCCED’H




Croix des Bouquets

HA, PI, ADF




Delmas

CRS, EMDH, AMI, HA, Parole-Action, OCCED’H, AMURT, BB, Consortium for re-enforcements of C Education




Ganthier

HA, Parole-Action, OCCED’H




Gonaïves

Save the Children, WV




Grand Goâve

TDH




Hinche

CRS




Jacmel

PI, BB, Consortium, Save the Children




Kenscoff

CRS, OCCED’H, HCR, AMURT




Vallee de Jacmel

PI




Léogâne

Parole-Action, Tear Fund, Tout n’est pas perdu, PADF, BB, TDH, Save the Children




Les Cayes

TDH




Marigot

PI




Martissant

Aide Médicale Internationale, AVSI




Petit Goâve

TDH, PADF, People in Need, Save the Children, IRC, Handicap International, French Red Cross




Port-au-Prince

AVSI, MAEC, CRS, HA, HCR, CEMEAH, PADF, Food for the Hungry, JCICS, IRC, NCA, Save the Children, MSF Belgium, IFRC, MDM-Canada, MDM-Spain




Petion Ville

CRS, HA, Parole-Action, OCCED’H, ADF, JCICS, IRC, Mercy Corps, Save the Children, IFRC




Tabarre

OCCED’H, PADF, Mercy Corps




Thomaszeau

Ami, HA, OCCED’H




Martissant

Aide Médicale Internationale, AVSI

Petit Goâve

TDH, PADF, People in Need, Save the Children, IRC, Handicap International, French Red Cross

Port-au-Prince

AVSI, MAEC, CRS, HA, HCR, CEMEAH, PADF, Food for the Hungry, JCICS, IRC, NCA, Save the Children, MSF Belgium, IFRC, MDM-Canada, MDM-Spain

Petion Ville

CRS, HA, Parole-Action, OCCED’H, ADF, JCICS, IRC, Mercy Corps, SC, IFRC

Tabarre

OCCED’H, PADF, Mercy Corps

Thomaszeau

Ami, HA, OCCED’H


Activities

Indicators

Data sources

Target 2011

OBJECTIVE 1) Prevent and respond to separated and unaccompanied children

1.1 Training on register, trace and follow up with separated children.

Number of caseworkers trained on registration and tracing.

HUB FTR

250

1.2 Prevention and response systems in place for family separation, trafficking, smuggling and illegal movement.

Number of separated children registered in 2011.

HUB FTR

2000

Percentage of families actively traced in 2011.

HUB FTR

2000

Percentage of children who have been reunified with their families.

HUB FTR

50%

Number of child trafficking victims reunified with their families through the Family Tracing and Reunification Programme.

HUB FTR

200

1.3 Improved care giving interventions for orphans, separated, and unaccompanied children.

Number of vulnerable children (including street children) with access to services.

3W mapping

50,000

Number of residential childcare centres where conditions have improved.

MAST/ IBESR

200

OBJECTIVE 2) Strengthen Government, civil society and local authorities’ skills and capacity to respond to child protection needs in order to create a protective environment for children

2.1 Advocacy with GoH on protection standards and guidelines and durable solutions for vulnerable children.

GoH CP strategy issued and implemented (yes/no)

MAST/ IBESR

yes

2.2- Strengthen and establish monitoring and referral mechanism to child rights violations.

Referral and Case Management Surveillance System is rolled out (yes/No)

MAST/ IBESR

yes

Number of people trained on data collection and data management.

activity report

200

Number of child rights violations properly referred.

surveillance system

1000

2.3- Support to government structures and institutions responsible for key aspects of CP.

Number of IBERS offices set up and fully operational (working in collaboration with other GoH counterparts and civil society).

IBESR

5

Number of GoH staff trained on temporary care and psycho-social support.

MAST, clusters members

140

Number of national police (HNP/UNPOL) trained on CP issues.

custers members

200

Number of CP cases identified by HNP/UNPOL.

HNP/UNPOL

100

Number of BPM (CP Brigades) antennae (operational sites).

BPM

5

Number of BPM agents in border areas

BPM

8

Number of child verified at the border area (RD, airport) to prevent trafficking of children by BPM.

BPM

3000

Number of child trafficking victims intercepted and provided with necessary support .

BPM

200

2.4 Continue the registration process to provide documentation for all children (focusing on most vulnerable children in residential care centres and IDPs camps.

Number of children documented.

UNICEF/ sub-cluster members

500,000

2.5 Ensure effective coordination among CP partners and among CP, GBV and Mental Health and Policy Services Working Group.

Number of active CP sub-cluster members / number of active members to cluster working groups.

sub-cluster bi-monthly report

60

2.6 Promote the respect to children rights during the return/ relocalization, preventing family separation.

Percentage of returns and reintegration operations addressing CP concerns.

sub-cluster bi-monthly report

80%

OBJECTIVE 3) Ensure emergency-affected children have access to community-based mechanisms that provide psycho-social support and protect them from risks of increased exposure to violence, trafficking, abuse, neglect and exploitation

3.1) Strengthen community structures to protect children from violence, abuse, exploitation and neglect.

Number of active community-based CFS.

Number of children referred to HIV-related prevention,care, support and treatment services.



3W mapping

450

Number of children who benefit from psycho-social activities.

3W mapping

75,000

Number of trainings conducted with relevant staff working on community-based CFS.

Number of trainings conducted with relevant staff working with CFS on life skills including HIV-related life skills.



Sub-cluster members

10

Number of recreational kits distributed.

Sub-cluster members

n.a

3.2) Most vulnerable children and women have better access to social and judicial services in all departments improved through better community-based CP system.

Functional referral network in place.

IBERS

yes

Number of CP committees established.

3W mapping

175

Number of protection cases identified and referred to relevant authorities/ services.

UNICEF/ IBERS

200

Number of women and girls trained on life-skills issues.

3W mapping

tbd

Protection Sub-Cluster: Gender-based Violence


Cluster Lead Agencies

UNFPA

Cluster Members

ACF, ACTIONAID/HPC, ADRA, AECID, AI, Armut Suisse, ANAPFEH, Antenne Santé/FONHSAD, ARC, ADS, BAI, Beyond Borders, CARE, CDAC, CECI, COFEDES, COHI, CW, Concertation Nationale/VF, CPFO, Croix Rouge, CRS, DD, Earthspark International, EMDH, FANM DESIDE, FONOX, FH, FRADES, GCST, Global Grassroots, Global Rights, GOAL, HI, HHI-LAC-DRC, Hilfswerk Austria International, HFC, ICVA, IEC, IFRC, IJDH, IJM, IMC, Institut Haitien De La Paix, ICWA, Internews, IOM, IPPFWHR, IRC, LERN, MADRE, MCFDF, MDM France, MERLIN, MFA/Norway, MINUSTAH, MSF-Spain, MSF-Holland, MSF-Switzerland, MUH, NCA, OHCHR, UNAIDS, PAHO/WHO, OXFAM, PADESS/ACDI, PADF/PHR, PAHO, Peace Operations, PESADEV, Plan International, UNDP, Progressio, SC, SOFA, SSF, UNICEF, UNIFEM, UNFPA

Cluster Objectives

  1. Preventing GBV through work with security and other sectors

  2. Ensuring women, girls and boys survivors of GBV have access to essential services including HIV-related services

  3. Ensuring the coordination and the monitoring of GBV activities

Contact Information

Sian Evans (Coordinator) evans@unfpa.org


Response to date

GBV was already extremely problematic before the earthquake, compounded by multiple humanitarian crises over many years. There is no doubt that incident of rape and sexual exploitation increased in the context of the January 12 earthquake, especially within the overcrowded and under-resourced camp environments. Though efforts to prevent and respond to GBV were initiated within days of the earthquake and have grown in number and breadth since then, even more involvement of the government, the international community and civil society is needed to effectively respond to the scale of the problem.


The GBV Sub-Cluster is an inter-agency body that has been coordinating inter-agency GBV interventions since the start of the response. Since its inception, the Sub-Cluster has grown to over 400 members representing over 100 different organizations including the Haitian Government, NGOs and civil society, and UN. The Sub-Cluster is now co-chaired by UNFPA and the Women's Ministry. The sub-cluster also strengthens the national response by aligning its work directly with the 5 year “National Plan to End Violence Against Women” validated in 2005 by the Concertation Nationale. In order to further strengthen coordination of GBV prevention and response, UNFPA organized a National Workshop in August enabling sharing of experiences and information between government institutions, NGOs and grassroots organizations.
As a result of coordination efforts, there is now increased patrolling, additional lighting in camps, and a referral system for survivors. In terms of prevention and protection, coordination is being fine tuned with UNPOL and HNP to ensure that patrols are ensured and more responsive to women’s needs. Problematic areas have been identified and training with the UNPOL on GBV and the referral mechanisms are being conducted. Sub-cluster members liaise with other clusters to improve the layout of camps to reduce women’s, girls’ and boys’ exposure to GBV. Several agencies in the Sub- Cluster have been specifically active in improving the lighting in camps through the placement of solar lights in areas with high reports of GBV cases. These interventions are coordinated with the camp management and the Protection Cluster.
The Sub-cluster works to increase response activities to ensure survivors access to services. This is done through the distribution of over 50.000 referral cards and leaflets in French and in Creole that list most available services. The GBV referral working group leads this effort.
Monitoring and reporting is also a priority of the GBV Sub-Cluster, with the reactivation of the national database. The Sub-Cluster is supporting the Women’s Ministry with staff and equipment to reactivate the national database that was destroyed during the earthquake. The use of the national form to register cases of GBV is promoted within the sub-cluster and training provided for partners to fill it in adequately. However the activation of the national database is a lengthy task.

Needs analysis

In the ever-evolving context of post-earthquake Haiti, the GBV Sub-Cluster has also faced challenges:


Mapping

In the aftermath of the earthquake, immediate efforts were focused on responding to incidents of violence against women by increasing women, girls and boys’ access to existing medical, police, legal, and psycho-social services. Very few services were available to survivors prior to the earthquake and many of those that did exist were destroyed, overwhelming available services. Mapping of all actors working on GBV was a challenge from the onset of the earthquake because many organizations did not have a clear view of their available funding or duration of their GBV programming in Haiti. As the reconstruction efforts transition to longer-term planning and there is greater clarity of which actors will remain in place to provide essential services to survivors. A team of experts (sub contracted from International Rescue Committee) is working with the Sub-Cluster to identify high-quality services offered by international NGOS that can included in the referral mechanism, thereby helping to relieve overwhelmed services. The results of this mapping exercise will be available by mid November and shared with the Sub-Cluster for discussion and possible inclusion on the referral card.


Data collection

Data collection also remains a challenge. Due to the earthquake the system in place has been weakened (through loss of both personnel and data) and many new partners have been using their own ad hoc information management systems. Also, as in most countries, GBV cases are underreported. In Haiti, where survivors often have to return to their camps where perpetrators are living, this is especially true. The Sub-Cluster is supporting the Women’s Ministry to revive the national data collection system and to promote the use of a standardized national form by partners to register cases of GBV. As with any new international media support, this process will take time to become fully operational.


Involving grassroots organizations and public institutions

Coordination with grassroots organizations and Government institutions needs to be strengthened in order to more effectively prevent and respond to GBV. UNFPA, the Women's Ministry and the Sub-Cluster members are working on linking up active grassroots organizations working on GBV and important government institutions such as the MoH and MOJ who can add their voice and experience to GBV work. In turn, grassroots organizations can benefit from support, networking and capacity development opportunities provided in the context of the Sub-Cluster that can support them to act as "case managers" within the community to provide education and support and refer survivors to appropriate services including HIV-related prevention, care support and treatment services.



Capacity development

Training remains a key activity for preventing and responding to GBV. Training of camps managers, UNPOL and the national police has been ongoing however there is a need to increase the number of key actors trained on general issues on GBV and the referral mechanism.


Objectives:

Preventing GBV through work with security and other sectors



  • Preventing incidents by ensuring that women, girls and boys are not at risk because of the layout by supporting other clusters, such as CCM, Shelter, WASH.

  • Improving quality and adequate security and protection services in camps and communities with UNPOL and the HNP. This includes ensuring the efficiency of patrolling.

  • Strengthening the resilience of families and communities can be the best form of prevention and protection, through support to livelihoods and opportunities to decrease vulnerability.

  • Conducting information, education and communication campaign that include radio, television, theatre to prevent GBV with appropriate messages that promote women’s rights to dignity.

  • Ensuring women and girl survivors of GBV have access to essential services

  • Working with partners to support a system of referral and care to ensure survivors have knowledge and access to health care, psycho-social support and legal aid.

  • Dissemination of information on the referral card through radio message.

  • Continuous training of UNPOL and the HNP on dealing with GBV survivors and the referral mechanism.

  • ensuring monitoring, reporting and coordination mechanisms

  • Ensure that all partners working on GBV are coordinated and share information on the national plan, national protocols and tools with these partners.

  • Mapping of existing partners working on GBV and encourage regular feedback on activities of these organizations to the Sub-Cluster.

  • Support the Ministère à la Condition Féminine et aux Droits des Femmes (MCFDF) (Women’s Ministry) to ensure coordination outside PaP.


Sector Monitoring Plan

The monitoring action plan will fall under the responsibility of the GBV Sub-Cluster lead in coordination with the MCFDF (Women‘s Ministry).


The indicators proposed have been set as a mix of quantitative and qualitative process indicators in order to efficiently track progress and attest achievements on the three specific objectives retained by the GBV response in this CAP. During trainings, for example, standardized training participant registration forms and pre-/post-tests will be used to verify both the number and type of people trained and the immediate effectiveness of the trainings on knowledge and attitudes. Other indicators will be monitored through reports from partners, such as on the distribution of NFIs and referral cards and projects with women’s organizations. Additionally, the GBV Sub-Cluster and contributing member organizations will engage in evaluating specific activities, including verification of a random selection of sites where lighting is installed in camps, mapping of partners with communications campaigns, regular review of the GBV mailing list and coordination meetings for content and relevance, and an assessment of departmental coordination structures.
The means of verification for each of the indicators selected for the GBV response to the CAP are as follows:

Indicator

Means of verification

Number of trainings on security issues

Training registration forms

200 lamps installed in camps with high incidence of GBV.

Number of NFIs distributed.



Verification of random selection of 10% of sites, at 3- and 6-months after installation.

Reports from partners distributing NFIs.



UNPOL/HNP patrols trained on GBV and referral mechanism.

Training registration forms, pre-test, post-test.

Messages on GBV disseminated throughout the country.

Mapping of partners with communications campaigns.

List of referral services updated.

50,000 referral cards distributed.



Updated referrals list-

Reports from partners distributing cards.



At least five women’s organizations supported in reinforcing case management for survivors of GBV.

Projects with five women’s organizations implemented.

All partners and actors working on GBV are coordinated and informed about tools, protocols, and existing national plans.

Review of updates sent through the GBV mailing list and participation and presentations during GBV sub-cluster meetings.

Coordination structures are activated at departmental level.

Review of department level coordination structures.

These indicators have been discussed and agreed upon by all partners and will be measured at the end of the period covered by the CAP. The Cluster will organize regular programme implementation sessions to address delays or implementation bottlenecks and act as a referee to take implementation enhancement measures whenever indicated and feasible.


Donors will be informed of the situation as the operation progresses along this CAP through their active participation in the Cluster’s work, through the various Cluster’s reporting instruments and through the financial and technical reports of each implementing partner due to them.
The cluster coordination will act as a facilitator for dispatching all monitoring and evaluation information associated with this plan in a transparent and timely manner.
Table of proposed coverage per site

SITE/AREA

Organizations

Artibonite

PADF/PHR, UNFPA, UNICEF, UNIFEM

Centre

UNFPA, UNIFEM

Grande-Anse

UNFPA, UNICEF

Nippes

UNFPA, UNICEF

North

UNFPA, UNICEF, UNIFEM

North-East

CRS, Plan International, UNFPA, UNICEF

West

GOAL, IMC, IRC, MSF Belgique, SOFA, Kay Fanm, PADF/PHR, URAMEL, AA, MUH, Global Grassroots, PADESS/ACDI, NCA, TdH, UNDP, Plan International, ARC, COHI, WCC, IOM, UNFPA, UNICEF

South

Tdh, UNFPA, UNICEF

South-East

PADF/PHR, WCC, Plan International, UNFPA, UNICEF, UNIFEM



Shelter & Non-Food Items


Cluster Lead Agency

THE INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF THE RED CROSS (IFRC)

UNITED NATIONS HUMAN SETTLEMENTS PROGRAMME (UN-HABITAT)

Cluster Members

ACF, ACT Alliance, ACTED, ADRA, America Continental, AMI, ARC, AVSI, CARE, CECI, CESAL, CW, CRS/Caritas, CVM, EPER/HEKS, European Civil Protection Team, FH, GOAL, Haven, IOM, IR, JRS, LWF, Mercy Corps, MSF, MSF-Belgium, MSF-France, MSF-Holland, Nippon International Cooperation, OXFAM, Oxfam Quebec, PI, Project Concern, SA, SP, SC, SIF, Shelter Box, UNHCR, WC, World Relief, WV, United Sikhs, Solidarités International, ERA Police, Loving Hands for the Needy, Loving Family Care Association, AA, IFRC, Seven, Caritas, CROSE, IFRC, ACDI VOCA, Medair, WFP, MSF Spain, HI, TdH, Caritas Swiss, Christianville, Intersos, Tearfund, FRC, IRD, Mission E4, MSF CH, The Deleaney Bay Fund, Welthungerhilfe, Civil Society, Cooperation Suisse, JEN, SASH, CARITAS Suisse, ADF

Number of Projects

23

Cluster Objectives

The Shelter/NFI Cluster’s overall objective is to achieve safe and dignified shelter for families affected both directly and indirectly by the earthquake. The provision of shelter assistance to the earthquake-affected population includes:

Objective 1: Provide tents/tarpaulins as emergency shelter assistance.

Objective 2: Provide transitional shelter as an interim solution to long-term shelter assistance.

Beneficiaries

1,300,000

Funds Requested

$91,835,715

Contact Information

Shelterhaiti2010@gmail.com


Response to Date

The Shelter and NFI Cluster’s overall objective in Haiti is to achieve safe and dignified shelter for families affected both directly and indirectly by the earthquake. Providing shelter to survivors of a natural disaster includes the provision of emergency shelter, specifically tents and tarpaulins, followed by transitional shelter.


As of 27 October 2010, Shelter/NFI Cluster agencies distributed 97,692 tents and 748,919 tarpaulins, and provided over 2.5 million household NFIs such as blankets, sleeping mats and kitchen sets. Based upon the GoH’s estimate of 1.5 million in need of shelter assistance30, these figures indicate that Shelter/NFI Cluster agencies have successfully provided enough support to cover the initial emergency shelter needs of the population affected by the earthquake.
Currently in the second level of the response, shelter agencies have completed the construction of 18,872 transitional shelters.31 The target remains 125,000 transitional shelters by the end of 2011, and agencies are putting in full efforts to make progress as quickly as possible despite continuing challenges.
The key obstacles to shelter construction remain land tenure, with many IDPs living in densely populated areas of private land, and rubble clearance especially in PaP. In efforts to address these issues, the Shelter/NFI Cluster has sought to strengthen its capacity to provide technical support and recruited, among others, a land, housing and property Advisor. Additionally, the Shelter/NFI Cluster has been actively investigating alternative usages of rubble, such as creating foundations, walling systems, production of sand for plaster and aggregate for concrete and concrete blocks, as well as the construction of a Gabion house.32
Needs Analysis

The earthquake in Haiti generated a disaster in a country already deep in a humanitarian crisis. According to UNDP’s Human Development Index 2009, Haiti was listed 140 out of 182 countries, making it the poorest country in the western hemisphere and ranking amongst the least developed countries. In 2009, approximately 58% of the population lacked access to clean water, 40% of households did not have reliable access to adequate food33, and over 90% of the informal settlements in PaP were in ravines or on hillsides, with almost 40% in the latter category.34


In terms of the needs figures for shelter, in February 2010 the Government’s baseline figures indicated that over 1.5 million individuals required assistance due to the earthquake. The needs for shelter can be divided into IDPs and non-displaced people: the substantive categories of displacement focus on urban self-settlement, host families, planned sites and self-settled sites. Non-displaced people are living in damaged houses and apartments, while others live in houses and apartments undamaged but vulnerable to damage in the event of subsequent earthquakes.
Based upon the fact agencies provided shelter assistance for more than 2.2 million individuals, it can be concluded that the initial shelter needs of the population have been met by Shelter/NFI cluster agencies. However this does not indicate that the emergency shelter response is completed.
The timely replacement of emergency shelter materials is critical for the affected population as transitional and permanent shelter housing provisions are being developed. The average lifespan of tents and tarpaulins is 6 months. The materials must be continuously replaced until beneficiaries are provided with a more sustainable shelter alternative. The large scale of the disaster and its affected population, coupled with present challenges such as land tenure, rubble and other urban complexities means that a significant percentage of the affected population will remain in camps for at least another year.
In an attempt to aid the needs analysis for transitional shelter which is essential to a targeted and efficient response, the Shelter/NFI Cluster went through a process of analyzing a range of datasets as follows:

  • results of a satellite imagery analysis of building damage

  • results of a survey conducted across many camps in the affected area which focused on camp residents’ original housing

  • results of building assessments conducted by the MTPTC

Though all data sets came with caveats, triangulating between these analyses allowed the Shelter/NFI Cluster to develop an estimate of transitional shelter needs. Results indicated that agencies were generally aligned with the transitional shelter needs with the exception of Léogâne where the planned figure was higher than the needs. Consequently the Shelter/NFI Cluster has encouraged agencies to re-focus on permanent housing or yellow house repair in place of transitional shelter construction.


Objectives

The Shelter/NFI Cluster’s overall objective is to achieve safe and dignified shelter for those families affected both directly and indirectly by the earthquake. Specific objectives can be identified as follows:


Objective 1: Provide tents/tarpaulins and reinforcement materials as emergency shelter assistance

  • The provision of emergency shelter assistance was critical before the arrival of hurricane season and although agencies successfully met this initial need, assistance must continue for at least another 12 months while transitional and permanent shelter solutions progress.


Objective 2: Provide transitional shelter as an interim solution to long-term shelter assistance

  • Transitional shelter is an interim solution for families until longer term shelter provisions are available. They provide a measure of greater protection and security than emergency shelter. The overall goal is to build a total of 125,000 transitional shelters by end of 2011.


Specific objectives:

  • ensure access to safe shelter before the 2011 hurricane season in areas of return

  • ensure access to emergency shelter for the population unable to find transitional shelter solutions

  • ensure the availability and distribution capacity of stocks of emergency shelter and NFIs for an emergency response

  • strengthen the capacity of local authorities and national governmental housing counterparts

In support of objectives outlined above, shelter programming will increasingly target and consider health, protection, WASH and livelihoods. This will not only ensure the comprehensiveness of shelter programmes, which are aimed at supporting transition to durable solutions, but also provide incentives for the safe return of beneficiaries to their neighbourhoods of origin. It includes continued collaboration with other cluster partners to maintain a holistic and sustainable response for shelter, i.e. support initiatives by the Recovery Cluster on rubble clearance.


Agencies will continue initiatives to deliver accurate public information on shelter-related issues for both beneficiaries, local and international community. In the aim to reduce vulnerability, shelter agencies will carry out risk mapping, vulnerability and capacity analysis completed for all construction sites. Key groups, including the most vulnerable, are consulted in the analysis and design of shelter and NFI response, and the findings are used to ensure the design of equitably accessible, targeted and culturally appropriate services. Women, and adolescent girls and boys are included in reconstruction teams, committees. Those participating in related training opportunities include a diverse range of groups.



Specific objectives

Activities

Indicators

Ensure access to safe shelter before the 2011 hurricane season in areas of return.

Transitional shelter

  • Build an additional 15,000 transitional shelter to cover the identified gaps in the existing programmes in the metropolitan area and in remote rural areas.

  • Retrofit 30,000 plastic-sheeting sided shelter, up to the minimum standards identified by the Shelter Cluster.

  • Number of transitional shelters built.

  • Percentage of transitional shelters occupied two weeks after the handover to beneficiaries.

  • Number of transitional shelters retrofitted.




Yellow house repairs

  • Advocate and distribute MTPTC house repair guidelines.

  • Repair 100,000 yellow houses in accordance to MTPTC guidelines, including seismic and hurricane resistance practices.

  • Provide training in house repairs to skilled labourers, including the communities if possible.

  • Number of yellow houses repaired.

  • Percentage of repaired houses occupied two weeks after the handover to beneficiaries.

  • Number of skilled and unskilled labourers trained in housing repair best practices.

  • Percentage of trained skilled and unskilled labourers used in yellow house repair programmes.

Host families

  • Provide livelihood support to 50,000 host families in the provinces.

  • Number of host families and hosted families that receive livelihood support

  • Percentage of host families receiving livelihood support that allow their hosted family to remain living with them.

Ensure access to emergency shelter* for the population unable to return.

  • Provide timely replacement of emergency shelter for families without an option of return (Raul).

  • Number of tarps distributed.

  • Number of tool/repair kits distributed.

  • Number tarps distributed with timber.

Ensure the availability and distribution capacity of stocks of emergency shelter and NFIs for an emergency response.

Provide timely and coordinated assessments in the event of a sudden onset emergency.

  • Adoption of a common assessment form for shelter damage in camps following a sudden onset emergency.

  • Number of camps assessed within 72 hours Number of camps assessed by multiple agencies in the aftermath of a sudden onset emergency.

  • Stock in country emergency shelter and NFIs for 50,000 families for a response to a sudden onset emergency.

  • Number of families covered by the stock of emergency shelter in country.

  • Identify capacity and ensure coordination for an eventual emergency distribution.

  • Number of families receiving emergency shelter support within 72 hours of a sudden onset emergency.

Strengthen the capacity of local and national governmental housing counterparts.

  • Provide training to governmental housing counterparts.

  • Number of government housing personnel trained.

  • Establish effective coordination mechanisms between government housing counterparts and the humanitarian community.

  • Government counterparts participating in coordination mechanisms for the shelter sector-

  • Work with the government counterparts to identify principles and guidelines on shelter/housing.

  • Adoption of a legal framework for housing reconstruction.

WASH


Cluster Lead Agency

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF)

in support of the Direction Nationale de l’Eau Potable et Assainissement (National Directorate of Potable Water and Sanitation, DINEPA)

Cluster Members

ACF, ACTED, Allied Relief International, Ambassade de France, AMURTEL, AMI-Portugaz, Arche Nova, BUSF, Calistas Haiti, CARE, CARE Haiti, CEFED, CESVI, CHF International, CONCERN, COOPI, Cordaid Haiti, CRS, CRE, CRF, CRH, CRA, CRN, DSI, Eau Pure PWW, Edge Outreach, FOCIDES, GOAL, HAVEN, IFRC, IMC, INHPACTS, INTERSOS, IRC, IRD, Mercy Corps, Merlin, MHD/IOM, MOFECS/NCA, MSF-B, MSF-CH, MSF-E, MSF-H, MSPP/DPSPE, OXFAM GB, OXFAM Intermon, Oxfam Quebec, PSF, Project Concern International, SP, SAS Haiti, SC, SDC, SIF, TDH, THW Léogâne, The Mentor Initiative, SA, UMCOR, UNEP, UNICEF, UNICEF WASH, UNDP, Village-Planet, Viva Rio/NCA, WHO, and WV

Number of Projects

68

Cluster Objectives

  • Facilitate return and reintegration of displaced populations by improving access to minimum levels of safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene promotion in areas directly and indirectly affected by the 12 January 2010 earthquake (for example host communities or large towns inundated by displaced populations).

  • Maintain a basic level of life-saving WASH assistance in the areas affected by the 12 January 2010 earthquake, notably camps of displaced people and neighbourhoods around camps of displaced people, with a focus on the most vulnerable groups.

  • Reinforce the capacity of WASH actors to prepare and react to disasters.

  • Reinforce the capacity of national WASH authorities at different levels to manage, coordinate and respond to needs in affected areas of earthquake and cholera.

  • WASH Cluster will ensure that WASH in health facilities (including CTCs) is properly addressed and provide technical guidance or materials

  • Ensuring/providing sufficient clean, safe water at community level, specially densely populated high-risk population such as IDP camps, settlements or slums as both preventive and curative measures for the cholera response

  • Provide support in solid waste management and disinfection at high-risk locations such as markets or dumping sites;

  • Ensuring that men, women and children are mobilized and enabled to take actions to prevent/mitigate cholera outbreak risks by adhering to safe hygiene practices

  • Ensure continuous monitoring of the WASH interventions and in particular of water quality

Funds Requested

$170,976,975

Contact Information

hschembri@unicef.org


Needs Analysis: Water

Despite considerable efforts over the last 10 months, there are still enormous needs for emergency water assistance both in camps, neighbourhoods around camps, communities hosting displaced people, and areas of return and reintegration.


In spontaneous camps, recent surveys have shown that 33% (297/900) of the households drink tankered water, 27.2% (245/900) of the households drink kiosk water and 17.3% (155/900) drink tap water from the Centrale Métropolitaine d'Eau Portable (CAMEP) network.35 Currently, WASH Cluster partner’s critical interventions are ensuring a basic emergency water supply of at least 6.4 litres of safe water per person per day for approximately 1.1 million people. This involves daily tankering of almost 7,000 m³ of water. Phasing out of direct water supply in a sustainable way is still a challenge. The aptly named “beyond water trucking” strategy is steadily taking traction as agencies transition into sustainable means of water provision for displaced populations. One of the principal strategies is, where possible, to target water improvements at the neighbourhood surrounding camps rather than directly in camps, in an effort to reduce migration. To date ten major repairs have been made to the water network close to camps; 40 water kiosks have been rehabilitated close to camps, and 40 new boreholes have been drilled close to camps. Despite have these strategies in place, the WASH Cluster still estimates that at least 100 of the larger sites during 2011 will still require permanent water tankering during 2011.
In neighbourhoods and rural communities hosting displaced people, the problems of access to water supply are just as bad as in the camps. A study carried out by the Groupe de Recherche et d'Echanges Technologiques in June estimates that 1,700 cubic meters (40%) of the water storage capacity in the PaP CAMEP network has been damaged. The resulting low flow rates from CAMEP water-points were reportedly leading to waiting times of up to 30 minutes. An Oxfam Great Britain (Oxfam GB) survey from April and May showed that the average family was spending about 22 gourdes a day on water. Based on unemployment rates and average earnings, Oxfam GB estimates that up to 80% of Haitian households could be spending as much as one third of their income on water. In addition to targeting neighbourhoods surrounding camps, the WASH Cluster’s water strategy targets needs in neighbourhoods where transitional shelter is being implemented. Outside of PaP, many protected springs, hand pumps and small water supply systems have been affected by the earthquake.
The quality of available water in Haiti remains as great an issue as access. The water quality control group, under the leadership of the WHO has established water quality standards, including notably minimum residual chlorine levels at household level, rather than just at distribution points. The Oxfam GB survey found that 20% of IDPs treated their drinking water with Chlorox, 6% used Jif and a total of 42% used Aquatabs.


In 2011, members of the WASH Cluster will improve access to water quantity and quality by:

  • continuing water trucking for extremely vulnerable populations in 100 large camps where return is not foreseen in the immediate future

  • drilling 250 new boreholes in return and affected neighbourhoods in collaboration with the transitional shelter programme (equipped with hand pumps or possibly submersible pumps feeding small distribution networks).

  • installing / repairing 450 communal water points (water networks, springs, wells, hand pumps).

  • creating / restructuring / training / reinforcing 750 WASH committees and Community Agriculture and Environmental Protection Project International

  • establishing three water quality testing laboratories with the necessary equipment and personnel

  • completing one national emergency water and sanitation safety plan


Needs Analysis: Sanitation

Sanitation continuously emerges as a dire problem in Haiti which threatens the public health situation in camps and beyond. Haiti is the only country in which access to improved sanitation has significantly decreased over the past decade as indicated by the sanitation report by The WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. According to International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) special report, “Haiti: from sustaining lives to sustainable solutions”, if the immediate sanitation crisis is not addressed, there will be a second disaster in Haiti. No existing sewer systems or sewage treatment facilities have been built anywhere in the country, which is of particular concern for the 3 million inhabitants of PaP. Outside the capital, regular flooding of unimproved latrines (in close proximity to unprotected wells) creates a precarious public health situation.


In the last 10 months since the earthquake, the WASH Cluster has constructed over 14,400 emergency toilets. Despite extremely challenging circumstances with land ownership, lack of space and hard ground, the current reported average sanitation coverage is 117 people per toilet, which is well short of the Cluster target of 1:50. This figure may look bad, however, it may not accurately reflect the true coverage as it does not take into account toilets in former homes or in neighbourhoods near the camps. There is evidence (WASH Cluster survey, June 2010) to suggest that many people return home to use their own or their neighbours’ facilities (20%), as well as use other means such as plastic bags (7%), which are deposited in solid waste receptacles. Open defecation in camps is estimated to be around 5%.
Following the achievement of the phase I target of 11,000 toilets, the WASH Cluster consolidated their sanitation efforts in camps. On reaching the phase I target it was generally agreed that agencies should not try to build more and more toilets until they were able to adequately maintain, manage and monitor their existing infrastructure. In addition, many of the early emergency toilets needed significant upgrading (more durable infrastructure, lockable doors, roofs, adequate drainage, ventilation and lined pits to facilitate de-sludging). Major gaps still exist to meet sanitation coverage targets (one toilet and shower for every 50 people) there is the need for an additional 6,000 new camp toilets and 6,500 new camp showers along with upgrades/repairs to 5,000 toilets and 2,000 showers.
The WASH Cluster strategy focuses on improving sanitation coverage in neighbourhoods surrounding the camps, in return areas, and in vulnerable communities hosting displaced people, with the aim of reducing the pull effect of camps. As of 30 October, around 1,700 household toilets had been constructed. An aggressive strategy of material assistance and technical support to 150,000 households is envisioned in 2011 that includes support to the Shelter Cluster’s transitional shelter programme.
The WASH Cluster has experienced a large demand for excreta de-sludging mainly due to the fact that most toilets (especially in urban camps) are constructed using sealed above-ground pits as many locations are on private lands or hard urban surfaces where it is not possible to excavate. A total of 43 de-sludging trucks are managed by a variety of agencies and up to 47 private trucks are also under private contract with agencies. It is estimated that up to 600 cubic meters of excreta is collected daily. Emergency works on temporary waste stabilizations ponds at the existing Trutier dumpsite is underway, and the first of six ponds is currently in use. A de-sludging exit strategy needs to be fully defined.
Solid waste management by Department of Public Works Solid Waste Collection Division has significantly improved over the last ten months. However, the WASH Cluster estimates that 200 new skips and three new solid waste transfer areas need to be constructed in displaced population hosting areas.


In 2011, members of the WASH Cluster will improve access to improved sanitation by implementing the following projects:

  • Constructing 6,000 new toilets and repairing / upgrading of 5,000 existing toilets. Among these toilets, 500 are constructed that are accessible by handicapped individuals. In addition, toilets in 200 sites will have been equipped with lighting to ensure the protection of vulnerable groups.

  • Construction of 6,500 new showers and upgrading / repairing of 2,000.

  • Servicing 600 sites (around 15,000 toilets) by desludging trucks or manual desludging pumps. Management structures ensure toilets are kept clean and there is handwashing water available.

  • Constructing six new excreta treatment lagoons (Truitier).

  • Ensuring that 600 sites have waste bins and a waste collection service.

  • Decommissioning 1,000 toilets in the camps that close.

  • Constructing / repairing 150,000 family toilets in neighbourhoods / areas of return / hosting areas.

  • Training 20 bayacous in the safe use of manual toilet and septic tank desludging pumps.

  • Installing 200 new skips and three new solid waste transfer areas in hosting areas.

  • Creating 1 composting and recycling centre along with training 100 people in domestic recycling techniques.


Needs Analysis: Hygiene Promotion

Urgent needs still remain in the dissemination of critical hygiene messages. A survey carried out by Oxfam GB of 26,789 households found 28% had noted adult cases of diarrhoea in the household in the two-week period preceding the survey, 16% noted a child over five had suffered from diarrhoea and 34% reported diarrhoea episodes for a child under five. A Health Cluster surveillance report for week 22 notes that the number of typhoid cases has increased in the last few weeks. 36% of people surveyed did not know the causes of diarrhoea. In addition, 23% of people surveyed were scooping water using a container without a handle, and 16% of the survey respondents had water storage containers which were either not covered or not clean. Among the vulnerable populations to poor hygiene and sanitation, the people living with HIV and AIDS are more vulnerable and at higher risk of acquiring cholera infection.

To date, hygiene promotion activities have been focusing on providing key information on safe hygiene practices, such as hand washing with soap, as well as providing items to facilitate the practices. These include hygiene kits consisting of soap, menstrual management articles, toilet paper and toothpaste among other things, and washing basins and water collection and storage containers. A total of 87,300 kits have been distributed by the WASH Cluster, while the NFI Cluster distributed another 240,000 kits. Each kit is constituted for a family of five for either one or three months.
Community participation has been a key strategy of all hygiene promotion activities. Hygiene promotion staff works through existing community committees and structures to ensure that communities are properly consulted and that the population’s needs are adequately addressed. There are 2,200 hygiene promoters and community mobilizers, against a set target of 2,600 promoters. The Hygiene Sub-Cluster held two training of trainers in PaP and one in Léogâne, with support from UNICEF. Training hygiene promoters is a planned activity for all phases of the emergency response.
During 2011, the WASH Cluster will continue mobilization to ensure the proper use and maintenance of all facilities or hardware provided (toilets, hand-washing stations, water points, hygiene kits, mosquito nets) through identifying barriers to the use of facilities or changes in practice, as well as a better understanding of the factors that will motivate change. In addition to refresher courses for trained hygiene promoters, additional capacity-building is needed to address gaps identified during the review of hygiene promotion activities. Greater focus on monitoring and ensuring household-level water quality is necessary, especially as the period coincides with the rainy/hurricane season and the end of subsidized drinking water. Closer collaboration with the Water Quality Group is required, in order to link water quality at point of distribution to household level, taking into account transport from distribution source. Capacity-building of community outreach systems in household-level disinfection, chlorine residual testing, safe water storage and monitoring of water quality will also be undertaken.


In 2011, members of the WASH Cluster will improve hygiene practice by:

  • sharing basic hygiene promotion information with 250,000 people.

  • conducting refresher training for 2,000 hygiene promoters.

  • distributing 100,000 hygiene kits to vulnerable families.

Needs Analysis: Contingency Planning and Disaster Risk Reduction

Haiti is habitually affected by cyclones, flooding, disease outbreaks, and occasionally earthquakes and tsunamis. Strengthening of contingency planning at all levels is urgently to ensure that local government, communities and agencies are prepared to respond to disasters. A cyclone season action plan was developed in April as part of preparedness against diarrheal diseases and malaria that are anticipated due to limited water supply in overcrowded camps, drainage problems and presence of excreta in solid waste in the camps. The action plan was also developed to map out WASH-related NFI. Cholera diseases may become endemic to Haiti since the October outbreak.



In 2011, members of the WASH Cluster will improve WASH contingency planning and DRR by:

  • Pre-positioning 200,000 hygiene kits, 2,000,000 aquatabs and 1,000 rolls of plastic sheeting at department level.

  • Supporting 500 WASH committees in the preparation of WASH disaster response plans (epidemics, cyclones, flooding, tsunamis, and earthquakes) along with a WASH emergency response / repair kit.

  • Supporting 25 town halls, five CAMEP offices and 25 Service National d'Eau Potable (National Water and Sanitation Service [SNEP)

  • Supporting offices in the preparation of WASH disaster response plans (epidemics, cyclones, flooding, tsunamis, and earthquakes) along with a WASH emergency response / repair kit. These 55 offices will have the necessary means (computers, office furniture, motorbikes, funds, emergency repair stock) to execute their plans.

  • Establishing a system of community wide epidemiological surveillance with close collaboration with the Health Cluster.


Needs Analysis: WASH Emergency Institutional Capacity-building and WASH Emergency Sector Coordination

Direction Nationale de l’Eau potable et de l’Assainissement (National Directorate for Potable Water and Sanitation) [DINEPA ] has been actively leading the WASH Cluster since the very first days of the initial emergency response with support from the WASH Cluster team (seven individuals). To date, the WASH Cluster has set standards, developed technical guidance and dynamic strategies to meet up-to-date information, and collectively monitored progress through the cluster information management team. A WASH Cluster activity report is being provided at meetings and collective data analysed through the weekly report provided by NGOs to the WASH Cluster information management team. The team has also developed sub-zoning and a lead agency system at the commune/sub-commune level, and is now leading at inter-cluster level to develop better coordination mechanisms at the municipality level. A number of technical working group (TWG)s have been formed to address specific technical issues with the emergency response as follows:

  • excreta Disposal Standards and design TWG

  • sludge Disposal TWG

  • solid Waste Management TWG

  • Hygiene Promotion, Monitoring and Household Water Treatment TWG

  • beyond Water Trucking Group and Water Quality TWG

  • Contingency Planning TWG

  • WASH in Schools TWG

In 2011, it is conceived that all of the basic functions of the WASH Cluster will be fully transitioned to a ‘crisis cell’ in DINEPA with the required financial, material and human resources.




In 2011, members of the WASH Cluster will improve WASH emergency institutional capacity and wash emergency sector coordination by:

  • transitioning the basic functions of the WASH Cluster to a ‘crisis cell’ in DINEPA with the required financial, material and human resources

  • establishing a system for the monitoring of basic WASH indicators and partner interventions in 10 departments with the capacity to instantly analyze and react to gaps during emergency response

  • constructing / rehabilitating 3 water quality testing laboratories equipped with the necessary equipment and personnel

  • establishing 1 national emergency water and sanitation safety plan


Table Showing the Ratio of WASH Interventions by Region, Committed and Completed







Toilets

Showers

Hygiene Promotion







Displacement

tracking matri Pop.

Number

Committed

Number.

Complete

Person/unit

committed

Person/unit

completed

Number

committed

Number

complete

Person/unit

Committed

Person/unit

Completed

Number

committed

Number

complete

Person/unit

Committed

Person/unit

completed

Port au Prince Total

1,352,658

12,864

8,994

105

150

6,904

4,095

196

330

2,876

2,387

470

567

Carrefour

227,029

1,471

1,129

154

201

705

442

322

514

453

380

501

597

Cité Soleil

89,707

605

387

148

232

341

82

263

1,094

93

80

965

1,121

Croix des Bouquets

162,760

1,237

814

132

200

630

251

258

648

86

36

1,893

4,521

Delmas

341,207

3,687

2,397

93

142

2,251

1,512

152

226

708

546

482

625

Petion-Ville

111,270

1,301

800

86

139

989

619

113

180

669

627

166

177

Port-au-Prince

323,832

3,441

2,674

94

121

1,486

763

218

424

698

570

464

568

Tabarre

968,53

1,122

793

86

122

502

426

193

227

169

148

573

654

Other Directly Affected

372,874

6,509

4,957

57

75

1,914

1,422

195

262

1,494

1,533

250

243

Grand-Goâve

45,578

1,671

1,138

27

40

159

145

287

314

18

22

2,532

2,072

Gressier

31,316

605

483

52

65

204

168

154

186

106

112

295

280

Jacmel

24,969

346

295

72

85

148

120

169

208

169

169

148

148

Léogâne

234,136

3,506

2,768

67

85

1247

863

188

271

908

1,172

258

200

Petit-Goâve

36,875

381

273

97

135

156

126

236

293

293

58

126

636

Indirectly Affected

1,659

83

174

20

10

112

23

15

72

2

0

830




Ganthier

1,659

83

174

20

10

112

23

15

72

2

0

830




Total

1,727.191

19,750

14,423

87

120

8,933

5,540

193

312

4,376

3,924

395

440

WASH Objectives 2011

  1. Facilitate return and reintegration of displaced populations by improving access to minimum levels of safe drinking WASH promotion in areas directly and indirectly affected by the 12 January 2010 earthquake (for example host communities or large towns inundated by displaced populations).

  2. Maintain a basic level of life-saving WASH assistance in the areas affected by the 12 January 2010 earthquake, notably camps of displaced people and neighbourhoods around camps of displaced people, with a focus on the most vulnerable groups.

  3. Reinforce the capacity of WASH actors to prepare and react to disasters.

  4. Reinforce the capacity of national WASH authorities at different levels to manage, coordinate and respond to needs in affected areas.



Objective #1 Indicators: Facilitating Return and Reintegration

Targets

Number of new wells drilled in return neighbourhoods (equipped with handpumps or possibly submersible pumps feeding small distribution networks).

250

Number of community water points (springs, wells, handpumps etc.) install rehabilitated.

450

Number of water kiosks repaired and put back into service.

50

Number of schools provided with a full package of WASH assistance (including potable water, school toilets, hand washing stations and hygiene promotion).

300

Number of family toilets constructed or repaired in the neighbourhoods / areas of return / hosting areas.

150,000

Number of new excreta treatment toilets are constructed (Truitier).

6

Number of bayacous trained in the safe use of manual toilet and septic tank desludging pumps.

20

Number.

Number

Number of composting and recycling areas established.

1

Number of CAEPA and WASH Committees created/restructured / trained / reinforced.

750

Per capita water consumption of safe water (litres/person/day).

10

Number r of people receiving basic training in hygiene promotion techniques.

250,000

Percentage of men, women and children that can demonstrate knowledge of key hygiene practices.

100%

Objective #2 Indicators: Life-saving Camp / Neighbourhood WASH Assistance

Targets

Number of sites supported with water trucking.

100

Number of water points supplied with water from tankers that have established a system of cost recovery for operational costs.

250

Number of new public toilets constructed in camps and neighbourhoods containing camps.

6,000

Number of communal toilets repaired in camps and neighbourhoods containing camps.

5,000

Number of communal toilets that are constructed for handicapped individuals.

500

Number of sites where communal toilets have been equipped with lighting to ensure the protection of vulnerable groups.

200

Number of new communal showers constructed in camps / neighbourhoods containing camps.

6,500

Number of communal showers repaired in camps and neighbourhoods containing camps.

2,000

Number of sites that are serviced by desludging trucks or manual desludging pumps.

600

Number of sites where waste bins and a waste collection service is established that ensures that waste is regularly cleaned up and collected.

600

Number of families that have received hygiene promotion training and hygiene kits.

100,000

Number of WASH Committees created, equipped, restructured, trained and reinforced.

250

Number of toilets that are safely decommissioned in the camps that close.

1,000

Percentage of sites where trucked water distribution points meet national water quality standards (chlorine residual only).

100%

Number of people per functioning latrine.

1:50

Number of people per bathing / shower cubicle.

1:50

Percentage of sites with adequate numbers of functioning hand washing stations present (soap plus water).

80%

Percentage of men, women and children that can demonstrate knowledge of key hygiene practices.

100%

Percentage of sites with ongoing hygiene promotion activities using trained hygiene promoters.

80%

Objective #3 Indicators: Contingency Planning and Disaster Risk Reduction

Targets

Number of hygiene kits pre-positioned at department level.

200,000

Number of aquatabs pre-positioned at department level.

2,000,000

Number of rolls of plastic sheeting pre-positioned at department level.

1,000

Number of WASH committees that have a WASH disaster response plan (epidemics, cyclones, flooding, tsunamis, and earthquakes) along with a WASH emergency response / repair kit.

500

Number of public institutions (5 town halls, 5 CAMEP offices and 25 SNEP offices) that have a WASH disaster response plan (epidemics, cyclones, flooding, tsunamis, and earthquakes) along with a WASH emergency response / repair kit and the necessary means (computers, office furniture, motorbikes, funds, emergency repair stock) to execute their plans.

55




Objective #4 Indicators: Institutional Capacity-building

Targets

Number of departments that have a system for the monitoring of basic WASH indicators and partner interventions and have the capacity to instantly analyze and react to gaps during emergency response.

10

Number of water quality testing laboratories constructed / rehabilitated and equipped with the necessary equipment and personnel.

3

Number of national emergency water and sanitation safety plans established.

1

Table: WASH Cluster Implementing Partners by Commune

REGION

SITE / AREA

ORGANIZATIONS

Port-au-Prince

Carrefour

Care, Concern, IMC, Intermon Oxfam, Oxfam GB, SC, SP, THW Léogâne

Cité Soleil

COOPI, IFRC, MOFECS/NCA, MSF-B, Oxfam GB, Oxfam Q, SC, Viva Rio/NCA, WV

Croix-des-Bouquets

ACTED, HAVEN, IFRC, Oxfam GB, WV

Delmas

ACF, BUSF, Concern, COOPI, CRF, CRS, HAVEN, IFRC, IOM, IRC, MSF-B, MSF-H, Oxfam GB, Oxfam Q, SC, SDC, SIF, Solidarités, Viva Rio/NCA, WV

Petion-Ville

Care, Goal, IRC, MSF-E, Oxfam Q, SC, SDC, Solidarités International, WV

Port-au-Prince

ACF, ACTED, BUSF, Care, Concern, CRF, CRS, Goal, Intermon Oxfam, IRC, MSF-CH, MSF-E, Oxfam GB, Oxfam Q, Prj Concern, SC, SDC, Solidarités, SP, THW, Viva Rio/NCA, WV

Tabarre

ACTED, Concern, COOPI, HAVEN, IOM, IRC, SC

Other directly affected areas

Grand-Goâve

BUSF, CESVI, DSI, Intermon Oxfam, Solidarités, SP, TdH

Gressier

ACF, ACTED, DSI, IMC, Intermon Oxfam, INTERSOS

Jacmel

Save the Children, SDC

Léogâne

ACF, ACTED, Care, CRE, DSI, Edge, IMC, INTERSOS, IRD, PSF, SC, SDC, SP, TdH, UMC

Petit- Goâve

Arche Nova, CESVI, DSI, Edge, IMC, Intermon, SDC, Solidarités, SP

Indirectly affected areas

Arcahaie

IFRC, Oxfam GB, SC

Cabaret

SC

Cayes-Jacmel

SAS Haiti, SC

Clercine

CRF

Ganthier

CRF

Kenscoff

SP

Mais Gaté

CRF

Marigot

Oxfam Q, SC

Saint-Marc

Oxfam GB

Satre

Oxfam Q

LOGFRAME 

INDICATORS

MEANS VERIFICATION

Objective 1-2 Ensure access to quality education for 500,000 children of 4 - 14 years old (pre-school and primary) in the areas of return, relocation, and host community

Percentage of children (4-14 years old) having access to school in the areas of return and relocation; percentage of IDP children having access to schools within host communities.

Camp and school survey

2) Ensure access to quality education to 250,000 children in the camps

Percentage of children (4-14 years old) having access to school.

Camp survey

Activities

a) debris clearance in 300 schools

Number of affected schools cleared of debris.

MENFP (affected schools); Cluster report, MTPTC/UNOPS database MINUSTAH data

b) semi-permanent school construction in 600 schools

Number of semi-permanent schools constructed.

Number of schools repaired/rehabilitated.



MENFP and Cluster records

c) teacher training for 40,000 teachers

Number of teachers trained on the adapted curriculum and psycho-social support.

MENFP and Cluster records

d) supply of teaching and learning materials for 400,000 students

Number of students receiving learning kits.

Number of teachers receiving teaching kits.



MENFP and Cluster records

e) advocacy for increasing the school budget allocations

Number of schools benefiting from financial support.

MENFP and Cluster records

Objective 3. Build capacities of 500 partner organizations (government, NGO, educational personnel, teachers, etc.) on DRR

Percentage of education departments with disaster preparedness and response plans.

Number of schools with disaster preparedness and response plans.



MENFP and Cluster records

Activities

training of 500 partners on DRR

Number of education officials trained on DRR.

MENFP and Cluster records

enforcement of the required standard and guidelines in newly built school construction

Number of semi-permanent schools which meet the required anti-seismic and cyclone standards.

MENFP and Cluster records

Objective 4. Build capacities of 200 education authorities at national, local and school level on planning, coordination, data collection and management

Percentage of education departments with a school database.

MENFP and Cluster records

Activities

a) Training of 200 education authorities on data collection and management.

Number of education departments with their personnel trained on data management.

MENFP and cluster members records

b) Provision of equipment for national and regional education departments.

Number of equipments provided to national and regional education departments.

MENFP and Cluster records

c) Training of 500 education officials on planning and coordination capacity-building.

Number of education officials trained on planning and coordination.

MENFP and Cluster records

d) Co-organization of cluster-related coordination meetings with the government officials.

Percentage of national and sub-national clusters holding regular meetings (more than once a month).

MENFP and Cluster records

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