BỘ giáo dục và ĐÀo tạO ĐẠi học huế trưỜng đẠi học khoa học phạm thị hà



tải về 2.93 Mb.
trang18/24
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu06.06.2018
Kích2.93 Mb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   24

89

... At the bottom of the long hill was the river...

6

90

...“The sow done bit Prissy and got her penned up unner the house.” “Good for the sow,” thought Scarlett...

6

91

... In her apron was a pile of silver tableware...

6

92

... Beneath his brow was one hollow socket from which a scar ran down his cheek, carving a diagonal line through his beard...

6

93

... “There will be no more offensive now that the snow has come,” I said...

1

94

...“Certainly not,” said the major...




95

...“He should visit Amalfi,” said the lieutenant...




96

...“I would like you to see Abruzzi and visit my family at Capracotta,” said the priest...




97

... “To-night you will tell me everything,” said Rinaldi...

1

98

...“I am happy,” said the priest...

1

99

...“Priest not happy. Priest wants Austrians to win the war,” the captain said...

1

100

...“No,” he said...

1

101

...“Another American,” said the driver in Italian looking at the hernia man...

1

102

... “He does really,” said Rinaldi...

...“He has a rendezvous. I know all about it.” “I have to go.” “Another night,” said Bassi...

1

103

... “Bring him in,” said the major...

1

104

...“Slit the tunic,” the major said...

1

105

...“Certainly. Remove the dressings, please, nurse,” the house doctor said to Miss Gage...

1

106

... “Remove the dressings?” questioned the bearded doctor...

1

107

... “I can’t.” “Test the articulation?” the bearded doctor questioned...

1

108

...“How did you do?” I asked Meyers...

1

109

... Why, I had asked...

1

110

... “Where did you tell him to go?”...

1

111

... “What do you believe in?”...

1

112

... “What a child!”...

6

113

... “How long did it take?” “Two hours and a half.”...

1

114

... How short was the time for fun, for pretty clothes, for dancing, for coquetting!...

6

115

... How could she have thought during these two years that other men were nice or handsome or exciting?...

6

116

... How could she have even endured hearing them make love to her when Ashley was in the world?...

6

117

... The afternoon was a quiet time...

1

118

... Next year would be a bad year, or a good year maybe...

1

119

... Three weeks was twenty-one days...

1

120

... A hundred yards a way was a camp of the Northwest Police, with fifty dogs, huskies all, who joined the chase...

4

121

... Tonight was the last time she would ever be ministered to as a child...

6

122

... And closely akin to the visions of the hairy man was the call still sounding in the depths of the forest...

4

123

... “In spirit; blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs”...

3

124

... Alone in the big house were Grandma Fontaine, in her seventies, her daughter-in-law who would always be known as Young Miss, though she was in her fifties, and Sally, who had barely turned twenty...

6

125

... Wrapped in layers of tissue was a bonnet, a creation that made her cry: “Oh, the darling thing!” as she reached for it...

6

126

... Written on it were his love for and joy that she loved him, but battling them both were shame and despair...

6

127

... Approaching them was the middle-aged gun-bearer, limping along in his knitted cap, khaki tunic, shorts and rubber sandals, gloomy-faced and disguised looking...

3

128

...Dave was wheeler or sled dog, pulling in front of him was Buck, then came Sol-leks; the rest of the team was strung out ahead, single file, to the leader, which position was filled by Spitz...

4

129

... Accompanying him also were the smells of chewing tobacco, well-oiled leather and horses—a combination of odors that she always associated with her father and instinctively liked in other men....

6

130

... Lying between Atlanta and Dalton was the city of Rome with its cannon foundry and its other industries, and Etowah and Allatoona with the largest ironworks south of Richmond...

6

131

... But Scarlett hardly heard a word he said, so enraptured was she at being in the same room with Ashley again...

6

132

... She did not even hear his last request, so terrified was she by those ill-omened words, “if I were killed.”...

6

133

... The state militia who had gone out so short a time before, resplendent in new uniforms, could hardly be distinguished from the seasoned troops, so dirty and unkempt were they...

6

134

... But she could not answer, so stricken was she by the pictures her mind was drawing, Ashley lying dead in the snows of Virginia, so far away from her...

6

135

... So engrossed had they been in their gossip that they had not heard her light tread and now, confronted by their hostess, they looked like whispering schoolgirls caught by a teacher...

6

136

... So great was the shortage of paper in the Confederacy now that Gerald’s note was written between the lines of her last letter to him and reading it was difficult...

6

137

... She hardly knew how to face Rhett, so great was her humiliation, but the affair seemed only to amuse him...

6

138

... The ambulance men hurrying here and there among the prostrate forms frequently stepped on wounded men, so thickly packed were the rows, and those trodden upon stared stolidly up, waiting their turn...

6

139

... Pork had been almost worthless since the trip, so proud was he of returning safely with his wagon-load of dress goods, seed, fowls, hams, side meat and meal...

6

140

... Now he looked like a little old man, so bent was he by the wound in his hip...

6

141

... still more surprising was the change wrought in Dave and Sol – lek...

4

142

...Upon which impeachment of what to her was her most essential sex-prerogative, she made their lives unendurable...

4

143

... The whole long day was a blaze of sunshine...

4

144

... Scarlett could hardly take any joy from that kiss, so sullen was her heart at Melly’s prompting it...

6

145

...Here along Peachtree Street and near-by streets were the headquarters of the various army departments, each office swarming with uniformed men, the commissary, the signal corps, the mail service, the railway transport, the provost marshal...

6

146

...On the outskirts of town were the remount depots where horses and mules milled about in large corrals, and along side streets were the hospitals...

6

147

... What will your mother say when she hears?...

6

148

...What will she think of me?”...

6

149

...What do you value most?”...

...“Some one I love.” ...

1

150

... Never before or after did the names Republican and Scalawag carry such odium, for now the corruption of the Carpet bag regime was at its height...

6

151

... only by the flashing needle and the delicate brows drawn down toward her nose did Melanie indicate that she was inwardly seething...

6

152

... Not only can you outsleep anybody I’ve ever known and have the best appetite I’ve ever seen linked with a build like yours but you have an absolutely heaven-given ability to not have to go to the bathroom...

3

153

... And not only did he learn by experience, but instincts long dead became alive again...

4

154

...He was too busy adjusting himself to the new life to feel at ease, and not only did he not pick fights, but he avoided them whenever possible...

4

155

... Not even at the terrible moment of parting, when he stopped by Tara on his way to the train, did she have a private talk...

6

156

... Not until hours later did she recall that he had not kissed her on the lips...

6

157

... Not once did his eyes meet hers and he spoke no word of interruption...

6

158

... “Some one I love.”...

1

159

... No more was Spitz a leader greatly to be feared...

4

160

... not until two weeks later did the news reach Tara...

6

161

... no sooner had she arrived than Aunt Pitty and Melanie began a campaign to induce her to make her home permanently with them...

6

162

... No sooner had the lump gone down than her empty outraged stomach revolted and she lay in the soft dirt and vomited tiredly...

6

163

... on no day did they succeed in making more than half the distance used by the men as a basis in their dog-food computation...

4

164

... Not only did they not know how to work dogs, but they did not know how to work themselves...

4

165

... No long was this fact borne in upon him in some subtle, mysterious way...

4

166

...But only from life could Ellen’s face have acquired its look of pride that had no haughtiness, its graciousness, its melancholy and its utter lack of humor...

6

167

... only after three years of widowhood could it be shortened to shoulder length...

6

168

... Only with Melanie was this look absent...

6

169

... Only to Melanie, the next morning, did she permit herself the luxury of exploding...

6

170

... Never again did he intend her to have a recurrence of fear of the dark...

6

171

... Only then did he tiptoe downstairs, leaving the lamp burning brightly and the door ajar so he might hear her should she awake and become frightened...

6

172

... Little did it matter though, to her or the Confederacy, now that all the field hands had run away and there was no one to pick the cotton...

6

173

... Never in all his life had he been so vilely treated, and never in all his life had he been so angry...

4

174

... Never had Buck seen such dogs...

4

175

... Not only did the romantic aura of the dashing blockader hang about him but there was also the titillating element of the wicked and the forbidden...

6

176

... Not only had she vomited before a man—in itself as horrible a contretemps as could overtake a woman—but by doing so, the humiliating fact of her pregnancy must now be evident...

6]

177

... Not only was it fun but she was learning many things...

6

178

... They had seen other sleds depart over the Pass for Dawson, or come in from Dawson, but never had they seen a sled with so many as fourteen dogs...

4

179

... He had a great faith in Buck’s strength and had often thought him capable of starting such a load; but never, as now, had he faced the possibility of it, the eyes of a dozen men fixed upon him, silent and waiting...

4

180

... Never have I seen a greater, or more beautiful, or a calmer or more noble thing than you, brother...

2

181

... Afternoon naps were a custom of the country and never were they so necessary as on the all-day parties, beginning early in the morning and culminating in a ball...

6

182

... Never before had she seen so much misery in anyone’s face...

6

183

... Never once during these last days had he betrayed to Scarlett by one look, one word, anything but the affection a brother might show a sister or a friend, a lifelong friend...

6

184

... Never, never must Melanie see or suspect how she felt...

6

185

... Never had the kisses of the Tarleton and Calvert boys made her go hot and cold and shaky like this ...

6

186

...Never again could Scarlett lie down, as a child, secure beneath her father’s roof with the protection of her mother’s love wrapped about her like an eiderdown quilt...

6

187

... Never again would she start in fear at the sound of hooves...

6

188

... Never once did he call for mother, wife, sister or sweetheart and this omission worried Carreen...

6

189

... Never before had she put this remarkable idea into words...

6

190

... Never before had the cleavage of the very rich and the very poor been so marked...

6

191

... Only then did he tiptoe downstairs, leaving the lamp burning brightly and the door ajar so he might hear her should she awake and become frightened...

6

192

... Never again did he intend her to have a recurrence of fear of the dark...

6

193

... Hardly had he finished the first lines when two other voices, drunken voices, assailed him, enraged foolish voices that stumbled over words and blurred them together...

6

194

... Never again would she give aid to anyone if it meant having the Yankees come down on her like a swarm of hornets...

6

195

... I knew I did not love Catherine Barkley nor had any idea of loving her...

1

196

... But for a long time we did not see any lights, nor did we see the shore but rowed steadily in the dark riding with the waves...

1

197

...His jaws closed on the hand, nor did they relax till his senses were choked out of him once more...

4

198

... Buck remembered the man in the red sweater, and retreated slowly; nor did he attempt to charge in when Soleks was once more brought forward...

4

199

...The Canadian Government would be no loser, nor would its despatches travel the slower...

4

200

... The day had been long and arduous, and he slept soundly and comfortably, though he growled and barked and wrestled with bad dreams. Nor did he open his eyes till roused by the noises of the waking camp...

4

201

...Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, misteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and the beaten earth around it, and to plunge into the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did he wonder where or why, that call sounding imperiously, deep in the forest...

4

202

...Further, he had no thousand dollars; nor had Hans or Pete...

4

203

...As though animated by a common impulse, the onlookers drew back to a respectful distance; nor were they again indiscreet enough to interrupt...

4

204

... Fish, in open pools, were not too quick for him; nor were beaver, mending their dams, too wary...

4

205

...From then on, night and day, Buck never left his prey, never gave it a moment’s rest, never permitted it to browse the leaves of trees or the shoots of young birch and willow. Nor did he give the wounded bull opportunity to slake his burning thirst in the slender trickling streams they crossed...

4

206

...His heart was not in the work, nor was the heart of any dog...

4

207

...I do not belong in this mad present of killing and I fear I will not fit into any future, try though I may. Nor will you, my dear, for you and I are of the same blood...

6

208

...Maybelle Merriwether was to marry her little Zouave when he got his next furlough, and she cried every time she thought of it, for she had set her heart on marrying in a white satin dress and there was no white satin in the Confederacy. Nor could she borrow a dress, for the satin wedding dresses of years past had all gone into the making of battle flags...

6

209

...Well, I admire your selfcontrol but I do not find myself equal to it. Nor can I masquerade in a cloak of romance and patriotism, no matter how convenient it might be...

6

210

... She did not see that Rhett had pried open the prison of her widowhood and set her free to queen it over unmarried girls when her days as a belle should have been long past. Nor did she see that under his influence she had come a long way from Ellen’s teachings...

6

211

...On top of everything else, she was actually making money out of the mill, and no man could feel right about a wife who succeeded in so unwomanly an activity. Nor did she turn over the money or any part of it to him to use in the store...

6

212

... But men who expected to die within a week or a month could not wait a year before they begged to call a girl by her first name, with “Miss,” of course, preceding it. Nor would they go through the formal and protracted courtships which good manners had prescribed before the war. They were likely to propose in three or four months...

6

213

... And, except for her brief honeymoon interlude, she had not had fun in so long. Nor had she had any sense of security...

6

214

...“I hate to leave our fine house.” “So do I.”...

1

215

... “What do you want?”.“The seat.” “So do I.” I watched his face and could feel the whole compartment against me...




216

...Are you married, Tenente?” “No.” “Neither is Bonello.”...

1

217218

...“Do you want breakfast?” She wanted breakfast. So did I and we had it in bed, the November sunlight coming in the window, and the breakfast tray across my lap...

1

219

...Do you value life?”.“Yes.”

So do I. Because it is all I have...



1

220

...“I’m always hungry.” “So am I...

1

221

... The heights of Kennesaw were impregnable. So were Pine Mountain and Lost Mountain near by which were also fortified...

6

222

... The strange light the sun made in the water, now that the sun was higher, meant good weather and so did the shape of the clouds over the land...

2

223

... I begun to suspicion something. So did Jim...

7

224

... The man in the red sweater had proved that. As it was with Buck, so was it with his mates...

4

225

... Dr. Meade’s prediction was right—as far as it went Johnston did stand like an iron rampart in the mountains above Dalton, one hundred miles away. So firmly did he stand and so bitterly did he contest Sherman’s desire to pass down the valley toward Atlanta that finally the Yankees drew back and took counsel with themselves...

6

226

... For even as Andersonville was a name that stank in the North, so was Rock Island one to bring terror to the heart of any Southerner who had relatives imprisoned there...

6

227

... “He was there and he asked most kindly after you, as did his sisters, and said they hoped nothing would keep you from the barbecue tomorrow...

6

228

... Most of what he was saying went over her head, as did any conversation that was not personal...

6

229

... She discovered when she grew older that Gerald had stretched the truth somewhat, as was his habit when a little stretching would improve a story...

6

230

... “Oh, no, sir,” she laughed. “I don’t smoke, sir.” “Neither do I,” said Harris...

3

231

... I’d heap rather go to a war than go to Europe.” “So would I, any day. ... Look, Brent!...

6

232

... She wasn’t going to make a fool out of herself about the Cause, but neither was she going to make a fool out of herself by admitting her true feelings...

6

233

... “My husband wasn’t afraid to go and neither was yours...

6

234

... Or, as chance might have it, he would lie farther away, to the side or rear, watching the outlines of the man and the occasional movements of his body. And often, such was the communion in which they lived, the strength of Buck’s gaze would draw John Thornton’s head around, and he would return the gaze, without speech, his heart shining out of his eyes as Buck’s heart shone out...

4

235

... His eyes turned blood shot, and he was metamorphosed into a raging fiend. So changed was he that the Judge himself would not have recognized him...

4

236

... They closed in upon her, snarling and yelping, and she was buried, screaming with agony, beneath the bristling mass of bodies. So sudden was it, and so unexpected, that Buck was taken aback...

4

237

... The resulting tangle was even worse, but Buck took good care to keep the traces clear thereafter; and ere the day was done, so well had he mastered his work, his mate about ceased nagging him...

4

238

... But no matter how Spitz circled, Joe whirled around on his heels to face him, mane bristling, ears laid back, lips writhing and snarling, jaws clipping together as fast as he could snap, and eyes diabolically gleaming – the incarnation of belligerent fear. So terrible was his appearance that Spitz was forced to forego discilining him...

4

239

... To remedy this, he ate as fast as they; and, so greatly did hunger compel him, he was not above taking what did not belong to him. He watched and learned...

4

240

... Close in under the sheltering rock Buck made his nest. So snug and warm was it, that he was loath to leave it when Francois distributed the fish which he had first thawed over the fire...

4

241

... Straight away he raced, with Dolly, panting and frothing, one leap behind; nor could she gain on him, so great was his terror, nor could he leave her, so great was her madness...

4

242

... But when he was at last unearthed, and Spitz flew at him to punish him, Buck flew, with equal rage, in between. So unexpected was it, and so shrewdly managed, that Spitz was hurled backward and off his feet...

4

243

... There is an ecstasy that marks the submit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstacy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive...

4

244

... Themselves, they had covered twelve hundred miles with two days’ rest, and in the nature of reason and common justice they deversed an interval of loafing. But so many were the men who had rushed into the Klondike, and so many were the sweethearts, wives, and kin that had not not rushed in, that the congested mail was taking on Alpine proportions...

4

245

... What of the thin and rotten ice he had felt under his feet all day, it seemed that he sensed disaster close at hand, out there ahead on the ice where his master was trying to drive him. he refused to stir...

4

246

...What of the thin and rotten ice he had felt under his feet all day, it seemed that he sensed disaster close at hand, out there ahead on the ice where his master was trying to drive him. he refused to stir. So greatly had he suffered, and so far gone was he, that the blows did not hurt much...






1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   24


Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©hocday.com 2019
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương